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Question. Where do you start to describe a game as complex as this one with its many subplots and follow on plots from previous titles? Answer. You don't; time is too short to do so in anything but vague outline. The rise and fall of the city of Rome is the main story followed by Brotherhood. The game begins with the politically powerful and scheming Borgias, related to the pope of the time, having designs on expanding their influence in Rome and spreading it to other cities. Your job is to defend against this, but at first you fail in doing so, setting the scene for the game proper.

Then follows a set of varied scenaios ranging from multi combats to assassinations and sword-to-sword duelling. Enemies in this game are now more aggressive than in the previous titles, requiring you to be more prepared to lauch pre-emptive strikes. The game is not very different to any of the earlier titles and retains its focus on Ezio, the hero of the series, for the most part. The puzzles play a much smaller part and consequently there are fewer of them. It also adopts one of the most interesting multiplayer concepts around. Each six-player, 10-minute session has you in dual roles as an assassin and an assassin's target. Successful assassinations earn points; how
many points depends on your method. It's a game of hide and seek, implemented to perfection.

There are a couple of bugs but these are not deal breakers, and regardless of any shortcomings, Brotherhood's success comes from taking what made Asassins Creed 2 work and making it a less disjointed story and more cinematic in its look and feel. The makers' real aim seems to have been perfecting what is already good. There is not too much new here, but there are great improvements to what was there before. This is a superior game over its predecessors and very well worth investing in.