User Review

2864 Reviews


Previous Viewing Reviews 21-30 of 2864
avatar name

Posted:
2013-04-14

moffatt

Super Gamer Dude

8.0

Starcraft II Wings of Liberty for the PC has been eagerly anticipated ever since the end of Starcraft: Brood War over a decade ago. Luckily, Blizzard does not disappoint with this new continuation of the Starcraft saga. As the story goes, Arcturus Mengsk has regained support after his disastrous defeat at the hands of Kerrign at the end of Starcraft: Brood War, but his vendetta is aimed primarily at Jim Raynor. Raynor, now an outlaw engaged in guerrilla warfare with Mengsk's empire, is shocked to discover his old friend has been released from prison: the cigar-smoking Tychus Findlay. From here the story twists and turns until coming to a satisfying conclusion, with just enough of a teaser for future expansions that could only be done so expertly by a company such as Blizzard.

The campaign itself is interesting for its since of persistence: upgrades can be purchased aboard the Hyperion that directly affect future missions. This also makes optional mission objectives much more important, as they are what directly fund these technological upgrades. The value of upgrades range in importance: from giving marines permanent increases in health to providing medics with the ability to heal multiple units at once. In addition, "xenos samples" can be gathered from Protoss and Zerg artifacts to research further advantages for Raynor's men.

Owing to how long it's been since the first Starcraft was released, and how much games have evolved since then, this new one offers a branching narrative. Raynor can choose which missions he wants to undertake and which he wants to ignore. Each of the optional missions ultimately culminates in a choice that will dictate not only where Raynor's story goes, but what units will join him in his cause. Without spoiling too much, Blizzard has interwoven decisions into the campaign that will leave many players scratching their heads as to what is the most appropriate decision.

Of course, Starcraft is known for its amazing multiplayer just as much as its known for its interesting campaign. Starcraft II: Wings of Liberty holds its own as a great real time strategy game (RTS). Blizzard has shown commitment to its support of Starcraft II with its endless release of patches to fix any exploitable mechanics in the game until the end result is a perfectly balanced RTS experience. Players can form parties with their friends to participate in matches of up to four on four.

If the normal matchmaking isn't of interest, players can also join their friends for custom games. Made by the players for the players, these custom games can range from simple tower defense games to highly complicated role playing games that save your progress from one custom match to the next. Blizzard takes its custom map-making community very seriously, working around the clock to make sure these Starcraft cartographers get the support they deserve. It is through them that Starcraft II: Wings of Liberty remains such an endlessly replayable game.

Ultimately, Starcraft II: Wings of Liberty PC version is a great choice for anyone interested in experiencing Blizzard's sci-fi masterpiece.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-04-23

trinity

Super Gamer Dude

8.0

Resident Evil 6 had one of the most controversial development cycles of the series. Capcom expressed an interest in getting more casual fans to gravitate towards the series, and this acknowledgment caused an uproar among long standing fans of the series. Capcom's attempt to reach out to a wider audience does not go unnoticed, in Resident Evil 6, nor does it help make the game better. Only the strong points of the game, the ones that more often than not come from past entries into the series, pull Resident Evil 6 from out of the dregs on mediocrity and make it a game worth playing, just not one that is must play.

Instead of simply making one game that appeals to a certain niche, Capcom decided instead to combine four separate games and smash them into one game under the same engine. The result is the largest, most epic and most varied entry into the series, but it is also the most muddled. Rather than having one campaign Resident Evil 6 has four. Each campaign follows one or two different character from the Resident Evil series. The game's storylines intersect and overlap but each one can be played individually and has its own beginning, middle and end. The Tarantino-ish take on story telling is very effective and when they intersect it can be very satisfying. It is encouraging to see Capcom take this approach with Resident Evil, and it provides hope for where the series might go in the future.

The issues with Resident Evil 6 become apparent when the player realizes that some of the campaigns are simply not fun to play. Each campaign has its own feel and pace to it, Leon Kennedy's is a fantastic journey not unlike previous entries into the series, and is full of suspense and legitimate fear. On the other hand Jake Muller and Sherry Birkin's action-packed campaign seems like a generic pop and shoot game with a broken cover mechanic.

Extended fire fights and car chases are not the things fans remember when they think about the Resident Evil series, and Capcom's attempt to grab some gamers from Gears of War and Call of Duty by adding these elements did not work in Resident Evil 6's favor. Ada Wong's campaign is similar to Leon's, only with more stealth elements and it too is a great testament to the Resident Evil series. Chris Redfield's campaign meanwhile, falls somewhere in the middle of the two extremes.

Fortunately, regardless of the campaign, the graphics are top notch. With a greater emphasis on dark environments than in Resident Evil 5, the atmosphere is incredibly creepy, when it isn't being interrupted with gun fights and car chases. The controls are mostly solid, except for the cover mechanic, which is border-line broken, but most of the game can be played without it.

The good parts of Resident Evil 6 are some of the best in the series, and are a real testament to how good Capcom can do the survival horror genre.

Unfortunately the campaigns that put an over emphasis on action bring down the experience quite a bit. If those shortcomings can be overcome there is a great storyline and some terrific game play to be had here.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-05-28

double07

Newbie

6.5

Call of Duty: Black Ops II on the Xbox 360 is a first-person shooter video game, developed by Treyarch and published by Activision.

Well it's that time of year again. There's another Call of Duty out and of course it's immediately the best game in the series yet, the best selling in the series, the list goes on. So here's what I think of it. Whether you agree or not well that's up to you. So, here, we...go.

Black Ops 2 probably has one of the most interesting stories in the Call of Duty series to date. Using a similar system as the original Black Ops where the story alternates between flashback sequences, set in the 1980's towards the end of the Cold War where the player controls Alex Mason, and present day sequences set in the year 2025 where the player controls Mason's son David. The story is centered around the game's antagonist Raul Menendez with the flashback missions telling the story of what caused Menendez hates America and his decision to take revenge of both the USA and the Western world. The present day sequences then go on to detail what Menendez's revenge involves and how it is carried out whilst David Masons struggles to prevent Menendez's devious plan from coming to fruition.

What is, perhaps, the most interesting feature of the game's story is the use of an RPG-esque mechanic where the player's actions throughout the game effect the outcome of the story. This is effected by factors such as the choices the player makes at certain points, whether the player finds hidden information in certain missions and whether or not the player successfully completes RTS style strike force missions.

Personally I would have liked them to keep the game's setting entirely in the future which is far more entertaining and interesting than the 1980's sequences. On another personal note it felt like the characters were for some reason unknown to all but the writers are all overly gruff about everything for no reason at all. In fact it got to the point that I found myself quoting lines from Batman at points which was entertaining up to the point where I lost my voice.

Overall the angle the story is approached from makes up for the fact that in terms of writing it is merely average at best.

Black Ops 2's multiplayer is largely the same as previous Call of Duty titles. It offers a smorgasbord of game types in which any player will surely find something to keep them entertained for hours on end. What is perhaps the most interesting feature of the multiplayer is the class customization.

Firstly Black Ops 2, unlike its predecessor has returned to the treadmill style unlock system of leveling up to unlock new weapons and then using these weapons to unlock attachments for them which is frankly a terrible system, however the unlock points system has been kept for score streaks, both types of grenades, perks and wildcards. But that's not the point.

The main point of interest is the 10 slot system that is used. Put simply the player is given 10 slots which the player can use for weapon's attachments, perks, grenades and wild cards. This gives the player a certain level of freedom as they can choose any combination of weapons, attachments, perks, grenades and wildcards. This means that the player can go with the standard loadout of primary weapon, secondary weapon, 3 perks and both lethal and non-lethal grenades. It is the addition of wildcards is what gives players the increased freedom. Wildcards give players bonuses ranging from carrying multiple primary weapons to extra perks meaning that a player could choose to go weapons heavy with 2 assault rifles with lots of extras but no perks or they could choose to take just a pistol but have lots of perks that give them little advantages over other players.

The kill streak system has also received a makeover. Although the rewards are the same as the previous titles but with a futuristic twist such as the K-9 robot dogs. However, this time around instead of getting a certain number of kills to get a reward. Players must now earn a certain score instead of kills. This feels like an attempt at encouraging teamwork as the required scores are often awkward numbers such as 450 points which is the equivalent of four kills and an assist, however this doesn't really do much in the end as it can easily be over come by just getting an extra kill and going over the required score.

To be perfectly honest with you the multiplayer is just the same as the previous games in the series and anyone reading this will probably know whether they like it or not already.

So, here we are at the final verdict. Now I could give this a score out of 10 but frankly that's pointless because my definition of let's say 8 out of ten will be different to everyone else's so I'll just summarize the game and let you make the decision for yourselves. Black Ops 2 is, for all intents and purposes, a Call of Duty game. If you don't like Call of Duty already then you won't like this one. If you're new to the series it's a decent entry point for learning how the game works and getting used to the game but don't expect most of the new features such as score streaks to be in the next edition as it will most likely revert to the Modern Warfare set up.

Call of Duty: Black Ops II on the Xbox 360 is really aimed at players who are already invested in the series but want to see a bit of an innovation to the game but not so much that it's an entire overhaul.

User Reviews

del - 2864 reviews

avatar name

Posted:
2013-12-17

halfwit

Super Gamer Dude

7.5

On June 9th, 2013 Animal Crossing: New Leaf was released for the Nintendo 3DS. New Leaf offers players something all Animal Crossing games do, hours upon hours of entertainment. This simulation-style game will keep the player enthralled for years to come. The mechanics of this franchise that fans have come to love will not disappoint in this new addition to the series. The changes and new features that have been made are sound improvements that make play smoother and more exciting.

The Return of Successful Mechanics

In most simulation games, relatively mundane activities are played out by characters over and over. The trick to making the game entertaining and eventually successful is to make each activity fun as opposed to tedious, and to offer incentives to the player for completing the tasks. Animal Crossing games have been well known for entertainment value in the past, and they do deliver again with New Leaf. As always, the player moves into a town and builds a life there by decorating their home, catching bugs, managing relationships with the NPC residents of the village, and many other similar tasks.

What’s New, New Leaf?

In New Leaf, for the first time in the franchise the player is the acting Mayor of the town. This allows the player to decorate the inside and outside of their home as well as the rest of the town. This new feature is a large and welcome change to the previous games in which the player only had control of their own home. Starting at the beginning of the game the player makes important decisions about the layout of their village. The organization of the town and its buildings, and the decorations will be up to the player and their creativity throughout the game. The possibilities can seem endless from more traditional ideas up to a miniature Stonehenge. The more the game is played, the more options open up to the player. With the addition of the resell shop players can even personalize individual pieces of furniture, making their town completely unique from any other player’s.

Ah, the Possibilities!

Somehow, New Leaf seems to have maintained the adorable simplicity of its predecessors. This is exceptional news considering the plethora of new options to choose from. What does this mean for the player? There are new activities like swimming, new clothes and furniture, and even new holidays. With all the activities and ways to make each town unique it is truly impressive that the game has not become too busy or confusing.

Show it Off in Multiplayer.

The multiplayer from previous games is expanded upon greatly in New Leaf. When picking up this game, one expects to be able to visit the home of friends. As usual a visitor can be friendly and leave gifts, or be a butthead and mess up the landscaping. This can be done online or locally.

The new feature, called the Dream Suite, allows players to visit a dream world version of other player’s villages. In this way, a player’s town can be shown off to anyone without the fear of having their flowers stomped on. It is only a dream, so the town can be toured but not affected by the visitor. This is also a fun feature for the visitor because they can still run around interacting with the town, just without permanent consequences.

While that is all incredibly impressive, there is still more! New Leaf makes use of Street Pass by allowing the player to view the homes of every other player they pass in the real world. As long as someone has a copy of the game, their home is available to view in Street Pass.

Resort Island Multiplayer Minigames

For a more personal multiplayer, players can visit Resort Island. The resort is run by former Mayor, Tortimer, and hosts a multitude of games players can enjoy together online. It should be noted that it is not necessary to play with others online, as the island can be visited offline as a single player. This can be convenient in some ways.

The Final Word

Animal Crossing: New Leaf is so much more than just a game. It will offer up more entertainment value for the price than most games on the market, today. The new additions of content, activities, and multiplayer features will keep the game new and exciting for literally hundreds of hours. The online world of other players across the globe helps this game stay current and refreshing. From the huge changes to the tiny improvements in gameplay, the whole game has been revamped without losing its original simplicity and charm. Anyone who owns a 3DS can consider this game a sound investment.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-06

Garfedout

Super Gamer Dude

7.8

Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare on the PlayStation 4 was published by Activision and Developed by Slegehammer Games, the video game is geared towards a first-person shooter.

War sucks, at least it does in real life. In Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare it is hard not to see it as one giant and entertaining playground. From the guys that basically reinvented what the shooter genre really is, Advanced Warfare is a continuation of their boundary pushing concepts. You've probably seen the commercials and watched the gameplay videos but those experiences will pale in comparison to getting your hands in a sweaty death grip with your controller. Released for the Xbox One and PS4 as well as the 360 and PS3, Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare is another blockbuster entry into one of our generations most storied franchises. Let's dive in and see what exactly makes this game so much fun.

Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare has a pretty clear mission from the outset: it seeks to continually blend cinematic and gaming experiences until the line is indistinguishable. We can see how this happens with the addition of Kevin Spacey and Troy Baker to the line up of voice and motion capture talents for the game. Kevin Spacey plays the role of Jonathan irons, the President of Atlas Corporation. He is deliciously evil, dangerously charismatic, and always interesting. In short he's the kind of villain that you enjoy hating because you never know what he'll do next. These characters are brought to life with the type of reality that has only become possible in recent years. You can count the pores on the faces of the characters you run across and you'll be amazed by how realistic every little detail of these characters is portrayed. That's a lot of detail, right? Now imagine that level of detail while the world is blowing up around you.

The Call of Duty series has always been about trotting your character around the globe to kick butts, take names, and try and save the world. Advanced Warfare is no different. The chapter-by-chapter gameplay style works especially well as you traverse the planet as Mitchell, the protagonist for this story. You kick things off with an action packed tutorial-turn-full blown introduction mission in Seoul, South Korea. The gameplay tips come flying in almost as fast as the bullets and you are charged with quickly learning how to carry yourself on the field of battle. It's hectic, eye opening, educational and quite fun. The rest of the campaign will have you marching through a series of sort of familiar missions. You'll traverse battleships and fight your way through closed in cities all over the planet. You'll find yourself forced to take over bridges, defend them, and ultimately leave them behind. The gameplay has the traditional up and down flow of any Call of Duty game.

Advanced Warfare is set in the eponymous future but it never feels unbelievable. While much of the environment, in particular the cityscapes, feels kind of new and different it never takes away from the games tone: things are bad and about to get much worse. In fact there are elements in the campaign that starkly remind players of World War II. You'll see dark segments that include human experimentation, torture, and death. These are uncomfortable to watch but they give you the sort of juice you need to move forward and kick some baddie butt.

For fans that aren't enamored with the campaign and merely here to serve up some butt kicking online, never fear. Advanced Warfare brings the same sort of hectic, manic, and infuriatingly fun online multiplayer as the previous franchise installments. You'll find yourself weaving through all the different levels as you try to one up your opponent in the fast and furious game of modern warfare. You'll see new tactics employed by your opponents that make you furious and then curious. You'll have to spend hours online getting to a point where you can play competitively and defend your precious Kill/Death ratio.

Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare is an excellent game for fans of the franchise and those looking to take their first mission for Sledgehammer Games. Advanced Warfare is sleek, sexy, and filled to the brim with popcorn guzzling action. The performances by the sound team and motion capture artists make this one of the defining chapters in first person shooter history.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-07

brownie

Newbie

6.5

'Diablo III: Reaper of Souls Ultimate Evil Edition' for the PlayStation 4 is an action role-playing video game and is rated M for Mature, the game contains blood and gore and was published and developed by Blizzard Entertainment.

You ask a dozen different fans what Diablo means to them and you will no doubt get a dozen different responses. Some will shout out in joy about the way the series sculpted their gaming life to follow while others will mention sleepless nights spent at LAN parties. No matter what answer you get you will no doubt find yourself staring at the same core answer: Diablo is important and it means something. So when 'Diablo III' finally landed it came with an appropriate amount of fanfare. The initial offering was met with exuberance and then that exuberance turned to acceptance before everyone acknowledged that, well, the game was juts OK. Blizzard isn't okay with just O.K. So now we have the Reaper of Souls Ultimate Evil Edition hitting the marketplace and fans everywhere are once again going nuts.

For those people that played the 'Diablo III' release they noted that there were a lot of good things mixed in with a lot of not so good things. The action was all there but the reward system seemed out of whack. Let's not even discuss some of the difficulties fans had with getting online and playing with other people. So on that note we can definitely see where Reaper of Souls set its sights as it came to consoles and PC's everywhere. With two years of patching built into the release as well as a whole lot of fan feedback, this expanded edition of 'Diablo III' makes for a special treat.

An expansion without new content doesn't make any sense so let's take a look at what Reaper of Souls brings returning players to try out. Ultimate Edition first takes aim at the avatar of your control itself. You will see an increase in the maximum level cap along with an additional passive slot to play with. The skill system has been re-worked and streamlined and returning players can import their old avatar with ease. There is a new class as well to focus on: the Crusader. The Crusader is a special sort of Holy Fighter that capitalizes on medium to close range melee. All of these glossy new additions, tweaks, and re-works make the gaming experience so much more enjoyable and smooth. If this is your first foray into 'Diablo III' then make it your only one, do not look back.

Looking past the avatar itself we can see that there are a few new game modes to be played with. Kicking things off is the Adventure Mode. Adventure Mode offers players a completely unlocked game to play through. The storyline quests from your traditional Campaign Mode will be unlocked an in their place all of the waypoints will be accessible. In this mode it is time to kill things, a lot of things perhaps, on your way toward maxing out your avatar with the sweetest gear available. Followers of the 'Diablo III' storyline, no matter how cheesy it may be, will be excited to see that there is a fifth chapter of the storyline being added to take place in Westmarch.

As you fight your way through dead, undead, and dying enemies you will no doubt come across loot and goodies. Reaper of Souls changes the way that we interact with these things as the loot system has been re-worked. Loot 2.0 has lowered the amount of overall drops in favor of giving more frequent useful drops that fit your class. If you are playing for a friend there is now an in game mail system for you to send loot to wherever you need it to go. The endless hack and slash gameplay is as smooth and polished as ever and it will play just like any other Diablo game released before it.

'Diablo III: Reaper of Souls Ultimate Evil Edition' for the PlayStation 4 is a must own addition to any Diablo fan's library. This is probably the best, most complete, Diablo entry that we have ever been lucky enough to have in our hands. Who knows when Blizzard will drop something as good as Reaper of Souls in the future? It just might not happen. There is an almost endless replay value to keep you coming back for more.

avatar name

Posted:
2010-12-28

smithy

Super Gamer Dude

8.5

Sonic Colors Wii edition might well be SEGA's redemption yet as it proves once again the embodiment of SEGA excellence in this final offering for 2010. Although not quite flawless, Sonic Colors offers more than enough excitement rather than disappointments in this new adventure, with great looks, flashy abilities and breezy action, making this entry much more creditable compared to other offerings in an occasionally wobbly franchise. Saving the best for last, SEGA ultimately came up with a Sonic that's as vivaciously modern and fun as it can get.

Sonic Colors starts at a peculiar place created by Dr. Eggman Robotnik where the Wisp's planet is trapped and its power-granting alien creatures are held captive by the evil doctor. The astonishing beauty of Sonic Colors appears to be a fantastically wacky combination of Super Mario Galaxy, Captain Eo, and Tron, which incorporates all the Sonic indispensable essentials, from the casino to the grassy meadows of the Wisps' home planet. Among my personal preferences that many of my mates likewise find fabulous are the Starlight Carnival where you can witness the endearing blue hedgehog zip through space on an energy road and the Sweet Mountain scene from which you get a glimpse of Sonic racing trenches of popcorn flanking huge mounds of cake. Sonic Colors is undoubtedly the most excellent graphics on Wii in 2010, with its outstanding lighting and marvelous animation.

The gameplay itself is a pleasant surprise; already, the remarkably crafted smart and precise controls are astounding, but the presence of the wisps adds another dimension to the game where each wisp color corresponds to a certain power that Sonic can use. There are 8 colored wisps which give Sonic the extra quirks to some of its fascinating basic moves and abilities.

The addition of the new features in the gameplay is anything but lackluster and can absolutely test the capability of a diehard Sonic fan with unexpected twists and turns as you continue to explore the game that comes with amazing design and intricacies of the most intriguing puzzle concept ever. Sonic Colors definitely challenges your prowess through numerous paths, which you can only explore every time you secure a new Wisp that grants you a specific power.

The creators of the game made a near perfect work of blending the new and the old aspects of platforming that Sonic games are famous for. It provides a fresh and distinct flavor into the game as the players experience the evolution of the game in the last twenty years of its inception.

However, as colorful and wonderful as it gets, the game has its loopholes. There are certain parts of the game that are ridiculously too-easy and illogical they take the challenge out of the game. These areas are so downright dreary it even made me toss my Wii Remote and nunchuk from sheer disappointment. Worse, there's no other way to go around it but finish each stage of every world to make headway in the game. These parts with underhanded design seem like death-generators and are the main problems in Sonic Colors. The lack of warp pipes and alternate paths to create a fast traveling game necessitates following the long routes; a monotonous approach that plainly kills the fun in the game. Towards to the end of the game, checkpoints could not be located, making me waste a good three minutes stuck on the same level, throwing life after life and doing the same maneuver over and over.

Despite the few flaws that spoil an otherwise totally splendid gaming experience, Sonic Colors still ends up quite an awesome experience overall. This is one game that Sonic fans and Wii owners shouldn't miss grabbing. As an indicator of future offerings from SEGA, Sonic Colors undoubtedly delivers a taste of forthcoming treats.

User Reviews

The Sims 3 (PC) - 2864 reviews

avatar name

Posted:
2011-07-23

3459smith

Lowly Worm

8.0

The Sims 3 is a welcome addition to the franchise that has been around for so long. This is a much improved version that is compelling, fun, and liberating compared to the others.

Presentation is fantastic and just as expected. The player does not get the feeling that the developers let them down. There is still the same humour and the same challenges. Graphically there nothing technologically revolutionary here and there is not much difference between this version and the previous one. However, they still come out believable and are reminiscent of a surreal version of The Truman Show.

Now for the language, well, let’s just say that Simlish is still the standard and the music is much better. Good news is the music is nowhere near annoying. The music has been revamped giving it more energy and sounds more exciting that fits the new game to a T. the background music, much improved again, is also a welcome relief. Whoever chose the soundtrack had good taste.

The performance of the game is smoother even on a high end PC. There are no hiccups even when the graphics get to an overwhelming level. The gameplay offers a wider scope compared to the other versions, however, as mentioned, there is not much innovative differences between the versions. But this does not affect the gameplay at all. The appeal to the fans continues to be positive and this is the surprising part. There is more content in The Sims 3 than the other versions. This only improves on the review which is positive in every aspect.

The online game is also much improved on The Sims 3 compared to the others. But it is important to take a visit to the official Web site and access The Exchange where the gamer can download the contents like The Store which is the place to buy the furniture and make some transactions. The player can also create their own Sims blog through this site, although they make no impact on the game itself.

Now it could be quite disconcerting at times when the player gets to see their Sims acting more lifelike compared to the other versions. The Sims seems more natural looking. It can be amazing to take the Sims off to the beach, watch the day go by and simply laze around. The buildings look well designed too; there are details there which still completely surprise me. There are some bookshops where the player can zoom in read the books placed on display in their windows.

The older versions did not allow the player to go to other homes and interact with the other Sims. The Sims 3 does. Now some may say that the characters are not as cool as the previous ones, I disagree. The old Sims had features which were very sharp and angled, too much of a Sim. However, this newer version is for me, much improved. The features of the Sims are much softer and the curves rounder. This is so much more appealing than the sharp angles.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-06-15

Better on multiplayer.

mig51

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

Need for Speed Most Wanted has the weird position of sharing its name with a title from earlier in this console generation, but being a spiritual successor to an entirely different title from that generation. The original Most Wanted was one of those titles that bridged the gap between the PS2 and the PS3 by being released in very slight variations on both systems. It was a fun and silly title that used live-action actors to depict its tale of street racers and the police.

The latest Need for Speed Most Wanted has absolutely nothing to do with that game, though. Developed by Criterion, the game pulls almost all of its core gameplay elements from Burnout Paradise, with a few major tweaks. Just like Burnout: Paradise, it takes place in an open world where both the traversal between races and the racing itself happens. Also just like Paradise, it has a massive amount of leaderboards to compete with friends on, this time supplemented by the autolog system that EA has become so fond of.

Most Wanted's multiplayer is also very similar to that of Paradise, in that it simply dumps people into the world and allows the host to choose events, which consist of crazy challenges instead of the usual point-to-point races. For example, one event requires to park yourself on the wing of a plane and stay there. The players compete in the event, then drive on to the next one. This mode really shines in how it encourages players to be complete dicks to one another. If you are taken down during a multiplayer event, you are automatically disqualified, encouraging constant violence between players and creating an extremely hectic and fun experience.

All this said, the game absolutely falls apart when it comes to the single player. Solo play shifts the game's focus to its wide array of cars. As you drive around in the world, you find new, extremely expensive cars just sitting on the side of the road for you to hop in. Each car has a set events that you have to win in order to unlock upgrades and get "speed points" which allow you to race AI drivers on the "Most Wanted" list.

While the system is not inherently flawed, it quickly grows repetitive. The races that initially seem to be car-specific are actually repeated ad nauseam. Not every vehicle has the exact same races, but they pop up enough times to make the task of earning points a grind. The addition of cops to the Burnout Paradise equation feels out of place at best, and the difficulty of escaping from them with very little reward make them utterly pointless at worse.

Whether you should get Need for Speed: Most Wanted depends on what you want out of it. If you are looking for a fantastic multiplayer arcade racer, by all means, pick it up. However, if you are looking for a good solo racer, you should probably look elsewhere.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-06

Garfedout

Super Gamer Dude

7.8

War sucks, at least it does in real life. In Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare it is hard not to see it as one giant and entertaining playground. From the guys that basically reinvented what the shooter genre really is, Advanced Warfare is a continuation of their boundary pushing concepts. You've probably seen the commercials and watched the gameplay videos but those experiences will pale in comparison to getting your hands in a sweaty death grip with your controller. Released for the Xbox One and PS4 as well as the 360 and PS3, Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare is another blockbuster entry into one of our generations most storied franchises. Let's dive in and see what exactly makes this game so much fun.

Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare has a pretty clear mission from the outset: it seeks to continually blend cinematic and gaming experiences until the line is indistinguishable. We can see how this happens with the addition of Kevin Spacey and Troy Baker to the line up of voice and motion capture talents for the game. Kevin Spacey plays the role of Jonathan irons, the President of Atlas Corporation. He is deliciously evil, dangerously charismatic, and always interesting. In short he's the kind of villain that you enjoy hating because you never know what he'll do next. These characters are brought to life with the type of reality that has only become possible in recent years. You can count the pores on the faces of the characters you run across and you'll be amazed by how realistic every little detail of these characters is portrayed. That's a lot of detail, right? Now imagine that level of detail while the world is blowing up around you.

The Call of Duty series has always been about trotting your character around the globe to kick butts, take names, and try and save the world. Advanced Warfare is no different. The chapter-by-chapter gameplay style works especially well as you traverse the planet as Mitchell, the protagonist for this story. You kick things off with an action packed tutorial-turn-full blown introduction mission in Seoul, South Korea. The gameplay tips come flying in almost as fast as the bullets and you are charged with quickly learning how to carry yourself on the field of battle. It's hectic, eye opening, educational and quite fun. The rest of the campaign will have you marching through a series of sort of familiar missions. You'll traverse battleships and fight your way through closed in cities all over the planet. You'll find yourself forced to take over bridges, defend them, and ultimately leave them behind. The gameplay has the traditional up and down flow of any Call of Duty game.

Advanced Warfare is set in the eponymous future but it never feels unbelievable. While much of the environment, in particular the cityscapes, feels kind of new and different it never takes away from the games tone: things are bad and about to get much worse. In fact there are elements in the campaign that starkly remind players of World War II. You'll see dark segments that include human experimentation, torture, and death. These are uncomfortable to watch but they give you the sort of juice you need to move forward and kick some baddie butt.

For fans that aren't enamored with the campaign and merely here to serve up some butt kicking online, never fear. Advanced Warfare brings the same sort of hectic, manic, and infuriatingly fun online multiplayer as the previous franchise installments. You'll find yourself weaving through all the different levels as you try to one up your opponent in the fast and furious game of modern warfare. You'll see new tactics employed by your opponents that make you furious and then curious. You'll have to spend hours online getting to a point where you can play competitively and defend your precious Kill/Death ratio.

Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare is an excellent game for fans of the franchise and those looking to take their first mission for Sledgehammer Games. Advanced Warfare is sleek, sexy, and filled to the brim with popcorn guzzling action. The performances by the sound team and motion capture artists make this one of the defining chapters in first person shooter history.


Previous Viewing Reviews 21-30 of 2864