User Reviews

26 Reviews


Previous Viewing Reviews 11-20 of 26
avatar name

Posted:
2013-05-23

martinraven

Super Gamer Dude

7.8

Developed by Griptonite Games, Shinobi 3D is based off of the Shinobi series of video games originally published by Sega beginning in 1987. Created specifically for the Nintendo 3DS, Shinobi 3D is actually the twelfth title in this long-standing series. It is a welcome resurgence for loyal Shinobi fans that have been waiting for the next emergence in the sequence.

"Shinobi" is that Japanese word that refers to a ninja. Ninjas, in contrast to the samurai, performed a range of unorthodox warfare tasks including espionage, infiltration, sabotage, and assassination. These fighting methods contradict those of the noble samurai who strictly observed the rules of honor and combat.

In the Shinobi 3D video game, the ninja protagonist, Jiro Musashi must employ each of these methods using new attacks like melee, acrobatic, and ranged. But this ninja has a bonus advantage of magic as he fights his way through the game. The son of the original hero in the Shinobi series, Joe Musashi, Jiro survives vicious attacks to his Japanese village. The game jumps to the future via a mystical vortex where the real action begins as Jiro battles futuristic enemies.

Shinobi 3D features side scrolling game play just like in the previous game. This is a feature gaming fans loved and have been glad to experience once again. The game primarily utilizes buttons to control the Japanese action, however, a series of mini-games included use the touchscreen. Game play remains very similar to the original arcade style of the 1980s.

Shinobi Jiro Musashi is able to perform actions like sliding and double jumping as he thwarts the attacks of evildoers. In addition to his sleek ninja moves, Jiro makes use of ninja stars and a grappling chain to defeat his elusive opponents.

Shinobi 3D has received very high praise from long-time fans and newbies alike. Striking graphics and beautiful backgrounds as well as attractive animated scenes in between segments of the game were among some of the points highlighted and appreciated by gamers. As always the classic ninja action proves satisfactory for Shinobi fans.

Professional reviews awarded it a score of 69 on Metacritic while Destructoid and the official Nintendo Magazine of the UK lauded the game for its content and the challenge it presents to be appreciated by seasoned gamers. Gamespot also noted the level of difficulty in the game but also credited Shinobi 3D for its accessibility to the gamer at the same time. Gamespot stated that the ninja warrior video game was one to add to a gamer’s 3DS library, saying it is worthy of a spot on your shelf.

Shinobi 3D is not a video game for those seeking an easy victory. The difficult game play is best suited to those in search of the satisfaction of a challenge overcome. Classically stealth ninja moves and plenty of hack-and-slash thrills satisfy the craving for action as gamers make their way through an army of villains. Based on the experience of Shinobi fans thus far, you won’t be disappointed in this latest sequel to the series.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-05-23

martinraven

Super Gamer Dude

7.5

Tank! Tank! Tank! for Wii U lets players drive around in tanks shooting at things. That's the basis of things; however, the player may also play with friends to also shoot and destroy things. In Tank! Tank! Tank!, players will battle it out in multiple different Japanese monster and Mech scenarios including famous gameplay experiences.

Typically, when the player begins the level they are given a certain amount of time to defeat all the enemies. While this time limit can vary, it it usually about three minutes. When the player defeats enemies, they are awarded with medals. Medals can be used for unlocking tanks, tank upgrades and levels within the game. While some medals can be earned on a mission, the player may have to upgrade their tank and play the level again to earn another hidden medal. Unlocking all of the medals are crucial in being given the option to upgrade and unlock everything else in the game. It's also important for the player to try to earn the best score that they can get within the level in hopes of a chance at earning medals.

The player will usually just move their tank, shoot at enemies and defend themselves against attacks by defensive maneuvering and strategic offensive shooting. The player's tank has a standard weapon but is upgraded with yellow and blue powerups. Yellow is a light powerup whereas the blue powerup is a strong upgrade. This gameplay repeats in fashion until the player earns all of the medals, unlocks all the tanks and upgrades all of the tanks. This game is a fun game that allows family and friends to have a good time battling their tanks against large Godzilla-like creatures.

The vertical aiming in the game is automatic so the player just needs to point their tank cannon in the direction of the target they would like to strike. Besides the powerups that the player can find, there is also a hidden powerful weapon. The weapon is called the colossus missile and it is a nuclear bomb that will destroy any opponents within the surrounding area.

Tank! Tank! Tank! has rich cartoon-like graphics that capture monsters in captivating details and colors. Besides the visuals, if the player would like to do so they may also take a picture of the gameplay. The Wii U game pad can be used to capture a picture of the on screen action so it can be looked at anytime.

The multiplayer portion of the game also features four modes people can choose from. There is free-for-all where players try to stay alive and earn the most points within the time limit; Team Versus Mode and the Monster Battle Mode. The Monster Battle Mode allows players to team up against the monsters played by the CPU. Lastly, there is the My Kong Mode. This option might be overlooked by some people and is a worthy gameplay mode for trying. When selecting this mode, the player becomes a gigantic robot gorilla with the goal of defeating all of the other players.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-05-23

martinraven

Super Gamer Dude

7.7

Super Street Fighter IV 3D Edition is, by and large, an excellent handheld port of the popular fighting game. It successfully transitions the core mechanics of the console version to the 3DS, and doesn't skimp on the details. While it should come as no surprise that certain aspects of the fighter had to be toned down to fit onto the tiny 3DS cartridge, the port provides hours of entertainment for fans of fighting games with nary a blemish in sight. Additionally, the 3DS version is host to an array of exclusive features, from collecting figurines via the handheld's built-in StreetPass feature, to touch-screen controls ideal for getting newcomers to the series acquainted with the basics.

Visually, the game retains as much of the console iteration's graphical quality as realistically possible. While certain visual elements have been sacrificed in the switch to the handheld, the port remains remarkably true to the console's unique visual stylization. Previously animated backgrounds have been made static, and overall visual finesse doesn't match up to the original. This should hardly come as a shock, but what's truly impressive is the amount of graphical quality that remains intact.

This is one title that does a great job in showcasing the technical prowess of the 3DS. Visual quality aside, the 3D effect itself is quite impressive indeed, if a little unnecessary. The added depth does little to improve upon the already satisfying experience, though scrolling through menus and viewing your figurines in 3D does add an additional layer of immersion. There's also an option view the battlefield 'dynamically', which simply changes the camera angle during fights to a perspective that further shows off the title's 3D capabilities. The perspective does add further emphasis to the effect, especially with the 3D slider ramped all the way up, but it's not ideal for gameplay.

The controls themselves prove to be more of a mixed bag. This is a game best suited for traditional gamepads, and while the available options squeeze the most they can out of the comparatively limited handheld configuration, it's just not as tightly knit. Of particular note are the cramped shoulder buttons of the 3DS - they just aren't built for the exacting precision fighting fans crave when pulling off combos and the like. That being said, for all intents and purposes, the controls suffice in delivering as close of an experience to the console version as possible. The option to utilize the touch screen to pull off combos is a welcome addition for newcomers to the series and those not as adept at fighting games, but avid fans of the genre may scoff at the simplicity of this method.

All in all, Super Street Fighter IV 3D Edition delivers the goods in what manages to be a faithful recreation of the popular console fighter. It's a full-fledged Street Fighter experience optimized for Nintendo's 3D handheld. Given the relative scarcity of well-executed handheld fighting titles, it's a treat to play. It's well worth the price of admission.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-05-23

martinraven

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

If there is only one constant in the video game industry, it is certainly Call of Duty. The series, which originated on the PC in 2003, took off in 2007 with the release of the original Modern Warfare. Since then, Activision has taken great advantage of its new cash-cow, releasing a new title every year, and making sure that no newly released console goes without a version of the franchise.

And so of course Activision had a version of Black Ops II ready for the release of the Wii U. The game's single player campaign is a direct sequel to the original Black Ops, and alternatively takes place in the near-future world of 2025 and the late 1980s. The 1980s directly feature the characters from the first Black Ops,, while the near-future setting features Mason's son David. To be completely honest, the story is relatively bland and full of military tropes, but there is one incredibly impressive thing about it.

Instead of just presenting a linear "Run from A to B" experience, the developers over at Treyarch have implemented player choices, and even more impressively, they have actually made these choices matter. It's hard to give examples without spoiling the game, but there will often be choices that are not presented as such to the player which is particularly impressive even when compared to games with much better stories.

Since this is a Treyarch Call of Duty, the Zombies mode also makes a return, with a new "TranZit" mode that places you and co-op buddies on a bus that makes its way down the road as you fight off more and more zombies along the way. It certainly ads an interesting twist to Zombies, but it sort of remains the same thing it always was.

The multiplayer ends up working just about the same as it always has as well, with a few major changes. Most importantly, class creation is now handled with what Treyarch has coined the "Pick 10 System", which allows you to pick exactly 10 items. Everything is included, from the core weapon and its attachments to every single perk you take. As a result of this system you can also eliminate entire categories of weapons, even eliminate your main weapon entirely, opting for a knife instead, in order to make room for more perks and grenades. While it might not sound like much, this system allows for far more experimentation than the old system did, and therefore more variation in the other players you encounter.

To be completely honest, I was shocked by how good Black Ops II ended up being. I expected a fully competent game, but Treyarch surprised me by putting far more effort into both the single player and multiplayer than they needed to, and its fantastic to see someone actually trying to make this franchise better instead of just endlessly iterating on the same basic ideas over and over again like Infinity Ward seems to love doing with the games they release.

avatar name

Posted:
2010-09-15

martinraven

Super Gamer Dude

8.7

Working as a courier, Cole McGrath was instructed one day to take a package to the center of the Empire City and open it. Upon doing so, the package explodes and somehow destroys the city, killing thousands of innocent people. Cole wakes up to discover he had survived the explosion and gained super powers as well. He can, among others, shoot lighting from his hands and slide in power cables - basically powers related to electricity.

Cole has to decide fast whether to be good, or be one of the bad guys. Upon choosing, you’re either one or the other, there is no gray area. The powers you further develop as the game progresses are based on your initial decision to be good or bad. The game gets itself from the vilest rank – Infamous, while there is also a Hero rank if you have chosen the good side.

The story is interesting enough to keep you entertained, though you might find it tiring to be only playing one side. The dialogue will keep you captivated as it has been well – thought of, and the characters are rounded enough to be likeable.

The trend with games now is to immerse the player in the virtual world of the game; and with InFamous, the system makes sure that every decision Cole makes will directly have an effect on the game’s storyline, and the way people interact with you.

The moral choices you make decides how much fun you are gonna get from your gaming experience will be: if you are the good guy, a classic handcuff maneuver does the trick, but be the bad guy and everything just takes on a new turn. This said, I can say that being bad is really good – in games, that is.

Infamous’ graphics are so – so. They are stunning by their own right, but given the technology right now, the developers could have done something more to improve the visual glitches that pop every now and then in the game. The colors used and the Empire City’s texture and details are really visually captivating, and Cole was beautifully done as well. At least our hero doesn’t have glitches, and he moves very realistically.

avatar name

Posted:
2010-10-08

martinraven

Super Gamer Dude

7.1

If you ever had owned and loved a tamagotchi before, with its pixelized characters and cutey beeping sounds, chances are you are gonna enjoy the virtual pet game from Sony: the EyePet. The pet you will take care of in here is a quirky combination of a puppy, monkey, and kitten, but the result is a certified ball of cuteness and wide eyed curiosity. True enough, the game uses the innovative motion sensing capabilities of the PS3 Eye camera and the Playstation Move control to create an immersive experience. Though the game lacks individuality and a real sense of growth, I had enjoyed my time with it a lot.

First things first, one of the 1st things you will be taught is how to position correctly the Playstation Eye camera for your optimal gaming experience. When you have done so, you name your pet (mine is Brutos) and wait for its egg to hatch. Actually, you will be in charge of the hatching process by holding the Move controller upright and using it to heat up the egg. Once hatched, move the controller back and forth to rock it. There is no tutorial mode, so you will encounter a lot of trial and errors.

Playing with your pet is really enjoyable: you tickle it, push it around, chase him around your room like a simpleton running after nothing. – and all of these can be achieved with the use of the controller, or with your own hands! Reach out your hands and watch your pet jump. It is very exciting to interact with a virtual pet. You get all the fun minus the dirty things normal pets do.

There is no real reward for playing with your pet – neither does neglecting it. If you leave it for a very long time, the only change will be a fire buzzing in its head and it occasionally drags it food bowl, looking at it longingly. Do what you should do as a responsible virtual pet owner or not, your pet will still play with you when you want to. Some may find this a bore, but this is exactly the feature that I liked.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-06-05

martinraven

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Rock Band and Guitar Hero doesn't actually teach you anything. Many people, particularly musicians, take the stance that the time you spent getting good at a rhythm game could have been better spent learning how to play a real instrument.

Well now we have the best of both worlds with a game that teaches you how to play the guitar. Rocksmith comes with a USB adapter that will work with any regular guitar, and provides an environment full of amps and effects that function to let you enjoy yourself while you slowly learn how to play your guitar over time.

For people that have never touched a guitar before, the game starts about as basic as you can get. The first thing that Rocksmith will teach you the first time you boot it up is the proper way to hold your guitar, and then moves into how to pluck and tune the strings. For people who have decided to upgrade from a more traditional rhythm game, the developers of Rocksmith have included the highway of notes that scroll by the screen at a rapid pace, although this time they are actual notes.

Most people usually give up on learning Guitar because they are just playing boring songs they don't really recognize. Rocksmith has intelligently managed to completely dodge this problem by very quickly moving from basic lessons on how to make noises come out of the guitar into very basic riffs from popular songs. This keeps new students engaged while at the same time trying to give more seasoned guitar veterans a reason to buy the game.

Sadly, it is with this audience that Rocksmith completely falls flat. The game takes forever to ramp up to the higher level lessons and more difficult songs, and there are no options for people who already know the basics of guitar playing to skip any of the basics, which will often lead to them becoming frustrated. Because of this, the only people who should really be considering Rocksmith are those people who want to learn guitar but have never started doing so.

Beyond the basic learning modes, Rocksmith also features a number of videos that show the concepts that are being taught in-game in a very simple manner that make it far more personal and easy to understand. It also features something that it calls the "Guitarcade", which has mini games that often end up feeling like someone took the basic idea behind Typing of the Dead and shoved it into a guitar game.

Rocksmith certainly is not for everyone. It requires a desire to learn that not all people have, and its certainly not enough of a "game" to play for fun, but for the price it makes a fantastic training tool for people that are new to playing guitar, and it's a lot cheaper than a real person.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-06-06

martinraven

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

One of the biggest complaints that has always been levied against games like Rock Band and Guitar Hero is that it is just a toy that doesn't actually teach you anything. Many people, particularly musicians, take the stance that the time you spent getting good at a rhythm game could have been spent learning how to play a real instrument.

Well now we have the best of both worlds with a game that teaches you how to play the guitar. Rocksmith for the PC comes with a USB adapter that will work with any regular guitar, and provides an environment full of amps and effects that function to let you enjoy yourself while you slowly learn how to play your guitar over time.

For people that have never touched a guitar before, the game starts about as basic as you can get. The first thing that Rocksmith will teach you the first time you boot it up is the proper way to hold your guitar, and then moves into how to pluck and tune the strings. For people who have decided to upgrade from a more traditional rhythm game, the developers of Rocksmith have included the highway of notes that scroll by the screen at a rapid pace, although this time they are actual notes.

Most people usually give up on learning Guitar because they are just playing boring songs they don't really recognize. Rocksmith has intelligently managed to completely dodge this problem by very quickly moving from basic lessons on how to make noises come out of the guitar into very basic riffs from popular songs. This keeps new students engaged while at the same time trying to give more seasoned guitar veterans a reason to buy the game.

Sadly, it is with this audience that Rocksmith completely falls flat. The game takes forever to ramp up to the higher level lessons and more difficult songs, and there are no options for people who already know the basics of guitar playing to skip any of the basics, which will often lead to them becoming frustrated. Because of this, the only people who should really be considering Rocksmith are those people who want to learn guitar but have never started doing so.

Beyond the basic learning modes, Rocksmith also features a number of videos that show the concepts that are being taught in-game in a very simple manner that make it far more personal and easy to understand. It also features something that it calls the "Guitarcade", which has mini games that often end up feeling like someone took the basic idea behind Typing of the Dead and shoved it into a guitar game.

Rocksmith certainly is not for everyone. It requires a desire to learn that not all people have, and its certainly not enough of a "game" to play for fun, but for the price it makes a fantastic training tool for people that are new to playing guitar, and it's a lot cheaper than a real person.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-08-29

martinraven

Super Gamer Dude

Damage Inc Pacific Squadron WWII is a fun an interactive flight-combat simulation game where you pilot a plane through various combat missions in the Pacific during World War Two. You can pick from over thirty historically accurate aircraft as you fly and fight your way through the epic battles of World war Two from Pearl Harbor to Iwo Jima. This is a single or multi player game that you can play online which means you can engage with dogfights or fly in coop missions with other members of your battalion.

It comes with over 12 hours of combat missions, so you won't get bored. The more missions you complete, the more points you will get. You can use these point to get different planes and better armor. It's designed so you really feel like you are sitting in the cockpit experiencing combat.

There are many different game modes to keep you engaged. Some of the more interesting ones are:

Dogfight - Solo missions, perform numerous feats to stay in the air.

Team Dogfight - You work as a team and try and stay alive.

Survivor - You get a number of lives and once they're gone, you're gone.

Team Survivor - Same as survivor except you're part of a team.

Scratch One Flattop which is based on Admiral Robert E. Dixon's famous cry as he had bombed one Japanese carrier after another. You'll be carrying out his battle cry as you go after your own Japanese destroyers.

Pros:

Historically accurate battles, landscapes and aircraft.

Three types of combat-air to air, air to ship and air to ground.

Choose Arcade mode when just learning and switch over to sim when you're ready to pilot yourself.

Cons:

Graphics are not sophisticated and while historically accurate the landscapes up close look decidedly low budget.

The flight stick it comes with is not great at controlling action.

Sound can be repetitious.

In terms of the cons, you'll probably be more engaged with combat than perusing the landscape so the graphics are probably not as important as you think they are. And although, it sometimes comes bundled with the compatible with a Flight Stick Controller, you can play Damage Inc Pacific Squadron WWII with the ordinary handheld controller. That said, if you're serious about this game, a controller is a must have.

In terms of the sound, you'll probably too engaged with not getting hit than to comment on the sound-you can always turn it down.

Despite the cons, this is one of the few flight combat games that can be played with up to eight people on line. It also gives you a sense of how much the Pacific theater of war was fought in the air and how important the air force was to victory. It's rated T for Teen and is perfectly suitable for ages 13 and up. It's a great way to have some engaging and interactive family fun while also teaching some history.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-05-16

Review

martinraven

Super Gamer Dude

7.7

Some fans may have argued that the Resident Evil franchise started to steer away from it's roots beginning with Resident Evil 4 and the game developers also noticed this. Resident Evil Revelations takes the Resident Evil franchise back to it's roots. Players will have limited resources to draw from but will also face gaming moments that are chilling and will encounter monsters closeup. These techniques help to create a panicked, survival horror feeling that sticks with gamers and forces them to play the game strategically. Alongside the improvement to how the game is played, the developers also spent a lot of time detailing and texturing the monsters in the game, the characters and even down to the details of the environment itself.

Revelations takes players aboard the Queen Zenobia ship that is outside of the Arklay Mansion. Because of this, the ship's environment makes for very creepy game environments. Players are faced with dark hallways, rooms and will at times feel very uncomfortable. This eerie feeling will keep players ready and waiting for the moment they may need to fend off something. The game's sound also adds to the creepy nature of the environment. There are many moments when the game can be silent and then all of a sudden a breeze will howl through the corridors or a creature will let out a painful, scary moan off in the distance. Because of the sounds combined with the way the game plays, it will make for a truly scary experience that will freak people out and even leave some people on the edge's of their seats.

While the traditional zombies in the game have been replaced by another threat, the nature of the other threat is essentially the same as zombies. The Ooze as they are called were designed to become a biological super weapon; however after things went wrong the bodies are now lifeforms with the sole purpose of attacking and eating living beings. Besides these basic creatures, there are also other environmental elements in the gameplay that will leave people scared. The levels of the game are designed into chapters and some of the chapters end with a boss that the player must defeat. Once the chapter has been completed, the player may also choose a different character to continue with their own specific story.

This version of Resident Evil stays true to the standard controls from the previous games. This allows players to stop moving while they shoot or they may also strafe while shooting, dodge or aim their weapon. While the player can control their own actions, the same is not true for the CPU-controlled ally the player will eventually come into contact with. However, the A.I. of the ally does successfully help the player against enemies and won't unnecessarily use precious items or ammunition. Although the ally may help the player, they don't really cause that much damage to enemies so the player will more than likely have to finish the fight. This technique allows the player to get some help when needed but still allows them to feel scared knowing that the threat is still great to them.

There are a couple changes made to the co-operative mode of the game. For example, players can't play together in the main story but they may connect together online and use the Raid Mode feature. The Raid Mode allows two players to play together on certain stages of the game with stronger enemies and changes made to the regular level. Upon passing these stages, the players are given rewards points they can use to buy game weapons and items.


Previous Viewing Reviews 11-20 of 26