User Reviews

5 Reviews


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Posted:
2010-10-16

Philmav

Super Gamer Dude

4.2

This game features the musical Grease which became a sensation during its age. Grease: the videogame is designed to capture the magic of the movie basically to through singing and dancing. Every bit of the visuals is funny caricatures, from the exaggerated limbs and multicolored wardrobes of the actors to the vehicles that look like something that came out of a Roger Rabbit cartoon.

Despite of the friendly and funny images that this game has, it would be better not to let kids play this game as it may contain some lyrics that are a bit for adults. You wouldn’t recognize anything wrong because you will be busy laughing and having fun because of what you see. But if you listen closely to some of the lyrics to some songs, you will notice that some of them are dirty. It wouldn’t be something you want kids to hear. Some may find it offensive but others appreciate it for a more fun filled experience.

It was quite a surprise when this game hit the market because it was its first of its kind ever to be released with the Wii Remote options. The gameplay of Grease is similar to that of guitar hero where you need to follow the arrows on a track while playing the music to pass a certain level. In addition, singing along the soundtrack of the movie has been made possible through the karaoke mode.

However, you can only sing with the soundtracks and other music on the game while being in the multiplayer mode. You cannot sing along with the game if you only play alone or on single player. The game is designed to make one player sing along and the other person take control of the dancing portion of the game. If you don’t mind being challenged to sing while playing a game, then this is game is the right game for you. To be honest I expected to learn how to dance to the music and that is what the game portrayed, but did not deliver on.

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Posted:
2010-09-15

Philmav

Super Gamer Dude

8.2

I have to say that I am a huge Lord of the Rings fan and did play the previous release of this game. However, I found that the first game was a little dry and the missions just didn't seem to strike me as a whole lot of fun. This game is a massive improvement from the previous version, though.

It actually focuses on a little known part of the Lord of the Rings that a lot of people don't know about. So as it turns out the war in the north between the elves, dwarves, goblins, and Mordor forces out of Dol Guldur is gigantic, and according to the histories held some of the biggest battles of the war. You will be able to play all new missions which decide the difference between good and evil.

Are you getting excited yet? Still the battles will be focused around the fight for the middle of the earth, but the campaign structure has been altered drastically. It does come with all new and exciting maps that don't get bland like the previous release of this game did. There are sixteen campaigns to play and they are mixed up so you don't get bored.

After the missions you will be able to view exciting cut scenes that really tie the whole story together quite nicely. The graphics are ascetically pleasing and even show the strategic value to winning over a certain area. Don't get me started on the in game graphics and sound; truly amazing!

The game does come with six factions in all. The three new ones are the dwarves, elves, and goblins. Like most RTS games that all have there very own special advantages and disadvantages. For example dwarves are insanely slow while goblins don't have very many defensive attributes. You will have heros as well which have their own special abilities.

I do like how the game kind of has an old school feel to it. Your bases are now free-form instead of just a set size with different build plots. You can build buildings anywhere now and even walls have a huge advantage when determining your strategy. What I really like is resource buildings now collect money constantly. You will be constantly fighting over resource spaces.

The multiplayer mode is top notch though. There are over forty maps to choose from to battle it out with people online. What I really like about it is a RISK style game where you have to move your armies around the board. It seems more of a build up and destroys the game though, compared to other RTS games. There are a handful of ways to achieve victory, which makes it a very fun and exciting long game playing experience.

EA has really made a great game that has given me hours and hours of fun, they have really hit the nail on the head with this game. If you like RTS games this then game is a jewel.

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Posted:
2010-10-08

Philmav

Super Gamer Dude

7.9

Have you ever wondered how our world would look like if the World War III between the United States and the now defunct Soviet Union transpired? Well, now you can. Thanks to World in Conflict, we can game and shoot out way through World War III in the comfort of your own home. World in Conflict does not follow the typical style of gathering resources, building up, then creating a swarm of armies. Instead, it is almost like an action game, hiding behind a strategy game that offers hours of excitement in action.

Set in the alternate year of 1989, the Soviet Union has launched an assault on Western Europe, and of course the United States will come to the rescue. 4 months into the fight, the USSR launches a surprise invasion on Seattle and pushes inland. With the 14 mission single player campaigns you are a commander in charge of US defense. There is no option to play in the Soviet side in the campaign; you have to enter the multiplayer arena for that.

World in Conflict centers on destruction, and it does one might fine job. You get to unleash all the firepower of modern military units on an open battlefield, but you also get to experience the challenges of combined arms warfare. Tanks can kill tanks and other vehicles well, but aren't so good against infantry. Artillery can kill infantry easily, but aren't so good against tanks. Helicopters can knock out vehicles well, but are vulnerable to infantry and antiaircraft units. It's a constant chess match about what you need to bring to battle and how you use it.

The multiplayer mode of World in Conflict is designed to get you in quickly, yes, no waiting time, if there is an open spot in the server you can jump right in the middle of the action. It is fast paced and balanced. The minute you are in the game you can order your troops to attack; and if you get wiped out, the resource system of the game enables you to be back on your feet in no time at all.

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Posted:
2013-08-17

Philmav

Super Gamer Dude

8.3

Metal Gear Rising Revengeance for the Xbox 360 is a tight action game that doesn't try to waste a second of your time. As the newest installment to the Metal Gear franchise, you'll step into the role of cyborg ninja Raiden as you wield your katana against giant mechs, helicopters and robots in pursuit of vengeance against an evil American military corporation. Rising doesn't try to hide from its silly plot and instead offers a fun, goofy and stylish campaign experience that holds up to multiple play-throughs.

The convoluted story of Metal Gear Solid Revengeance starts about as lucid as any of the previous games have ever been, but it quickly spirals out of control in the first few minutes. For such a short campaign that averages roughly four to six hours, there are an awful lot of events and cameos that are thrown in to propel the story forward. This is perhaps the biggest issue with the game, as the combat and action is incredibly fun and addicting but constantly broken up with small cut scenes and conversations that give nods to hardcore fans and attempt to offer clarity as to why you're slicing up terrorists. Unless you're a diehard fan hungry for story, you don't really need any more convoluted motivation or plot to relentlessly fight off the bad guys when the melee combat alone is already a great deal of fun.

The gameplay is so fluid and easy to master that after a few minutes you will be dancing around enemies with graceful combos, kicks, knock-downs, and slashes that feel as satisfying as they look. The game is further complimented by the addition of Blade Mode, a time-slowing state you enter to deliver killing blows with pinpoint accuracy. Blade Mode has you chopping off legs, decapitating foes or turning someone into ribbons, all in fun and sadistic slow motion. Blade Mode also plays a strategic role in combat, as you often face bosses that require precision to take down or you need to rely on the time-slowing effect to defensively dodge objects and deflect projectiles. As you kill more enemies, you unlock currency and weapons to make yourself and your Blade Mode even more effective, encouraging harder replays of the game as you become more powerful. The only real issue with the combat comes with the erratic camera, which sometimes cannot keep track of the fast paced action and results in you getting lost in the heat of a battle.

Overall, Metal Gear Rising Revengeance for the Xbox 360 packs a little too much punch and ends up getting in the way of its own pace, but it's an extremely entertaining and action-oriented Metal Gear spinoff. If you aren't yet a fan of the Metal Gear series you may want to skip this one, but if you appreciate melee-intensive combat or love the Metal Gear series then this a simple and clean game that should offer a lot of fun and replay value.

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Posted:
2013-08-18

Philmav

Super Gamer Dude

9.0

If you're reading this then you've probably played 999 Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors, the prequel in this series of visual novel games by Aksys Games. If you haven't, then I highly recommend you do so before playing Zero Escape Virtue's Last Reward for the Playstation Vita. Even though all major plot points of 999 are reviewed at the beginning, the full experience can't really be achieved without playing both games. You wouldn't read the third Twilight book without reading the first 2 would you? With that in mind, I would expect most readers of this review to have played 999 and therefore I won't go into great detail on premise since it's largely unchanged from its predecessor. The basic idea is somewhat like the Saw series of movies. Nine strangers are abducted, and forced to solve puzzles to escape their environment and earn their freedom.

Graphics:

The good folks at Aksys Games really made it a point to address many of the complaints gamers had with 999, and none more so than the use of 2D graphics. In 999, the only thing differentiating the characters from one scene to the next were slight changes in their appearance. In Virtue's Last Reward, the characters are rendered in full 3D. Although there isn't really a lot of movement from the characters within their environments, they do change position when speaking and have distinct changes in body language from one mood to the next. Speaking of the environment, it's really the only thing that is moving in this great game and when it does, it's smooth as silk. Overall, I would rate the graphics at 9 out of 10. They are just so perfectly suited to the nature and tone of the game and you truly feel as someone would feel in the presented situation.

Sound:

Another complaint from 999, was the large amount of reading required. Although in a visual novel type game that's to be expected, I also couldn't help but wonder what the characters would sound like if they actually spoke. Well, wonder no more as Virtue's Last Reward features voice acting for all but the main character, Sigma. I actually prefer it this way, as it always annoyed me in other games when the main character's voice actor just didn't match the character or the dialog as performed didn't fit the situation. This isn't just some last second, tacked on feature either, as the voice acting is very good. One really neat feature with the voice acting is the ability to hear it in Japanese with English subtitles. It's definitely something different for a game released in the western world.

The soundtrack, much like the voice acting, really is spot on. Although a lot of the songs are similar, there are enough differences to appropriately fit each one to it's given situation and they all achieve the desired emotion. I would rate the sound at 8 out of 10, as I would have preferred to hear a little more variety in the soundtrack.

Gameplay:

Virtue’s Last Reward is a visual novel game. As such, gameplay is not very interactive and definitely not for everyone. You will spend almost all of your time reading through/listening to dialogue. Escape sections on the other hand, require the player to solve a puzzle in order to escape from a room they're trapped in. I much preferred the "gameplay" in these sections to the novel portions, but you can't have one without the other.

In 999 there were six different endings. To see each one, the player had to start the game over from the beginning and do everything again, but in different ways. This lead to a lot of tedious sessions of holding down a button to scroll through dialogue you had already read 2 or 3 or 5 times. This problem is remedied very well in Virtue's Last Reward with the ability to instantly jump from one part of the story to another. If you plan on going after all 24 endings in Virtue's Last Reward, then you will quickly see how important this feature is and the vast amount of time it will save you. I would rate the gameplay at 9 out of 10, mainly because I just don't think any game is perfect in this department.

Overall, I would rate this game a 9 out of 10. It's not perfect in any sense, but it's as close as you can get in almost every sense. I'm glad I didn't miss this one and you will be too. Happy gaming!