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23 Reviews


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Posted:
2010-12-13

butchdown

Super Gamer Dude

7.2

They call it the beautiful game, and this package demonstrates to some degree why it has this well deserved description. This latest offering in the series presents you with delicate touches and accurately controlled passes taking the place of the more crude brute fiorce tackling, and kick and run passing found in many football games. The players handle better and are much more controllable allowing for more subtle close contact play, and allowing the whole game to flow with less interruption.

Heading action is now more powerful allowing goal scoring off the head from a longer range. Not always a good point as now goal line scrambles are less likely. The result of all these improvements is a much more open and not always predictable play action both inside and outside the penalty areas. Fouls in the form of non deliberate handbalsl are another, not always welcome, introduction which, though sometimes causing unwanted breaks in play, make it more realistic, quite often occuring when defenders get in the way of a hammered shot into a defensive wall from a free kick or a tightly packed defensive formation.

Having said all that its tactically not all that different from FIFA 10, but that's not such a bad thing. But with the world cup in South Africa not present this year to boost football interest, sales will probably be less, but this is not a reflection on the package itself.

A great game not only for football fanatics.

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Posted:
2010-12-28

butchdown

Super Gamer Dude

6.2

Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six: Vegas 2 fell short to the expectations of the fans. But first, let’s take a look at the good points of the game. The game features an all-new eternal character system that permits the accumulation of experience points, as well as the new Advanced Combat Enhancement and Specialization (ACES) points that are carried throughout Vegas 2. Simply put, if you kill an enemy in the Assault Category and earn certain points in single player mode, those points are carried on to your next multiplayer or co-op game. In each ACES category, there are 20 levels that need to be unlocked; finishing each level has its own perks like innovative weapons or a huge windfall to your XP. Sounds good, right? Here’s the snag: none of the awards seem satisfying enough in its graphical display; even the kind of reward itself is quite unimpressive. The only redeeming value is you can pick them up where you left off as you go through various modes of the game.

The next interesting feature to this Vegas game is that you have the capability to run. The left shoulder button is now equipped with a sprinting action and the function becomes extremely useful in going between cover points or to escape a grenade explosion, for example. The function is kind of odd, though, especially for fans of Rainbow Six game who are not used to the idea of “running” and might not easily be able to adapt to this function’s presence. But once you get the hang of it, you’ll eventually realize its significance as I soon grasped how it makes sense and can be fairly helpful after all.

Vegas 2 is intended to be more strategic. Sadly, the 2 AI companions don’t seem to realize that, contrary to what the game leads you to believe. While I try to skillfully maneuver through cover pieces and survive fights the best way I could, the two airhead nimrods expose themselves and get gunned down. They might sometimes be of help in a battle but quite frankly, they’re real pains in the ass. Like most people who have played the first Vegas game, I know for a fact that the story has a lot left to be desired. Ubisoft has spun a remarkably attention-grabbing tale but left the players with one of the most terrible cliff-hangers in gaming history. Fortunately, Vegas 2 takes on the task of tying up those loose ends and even succeeded in fleshing out some of the characters by handing over a few incentives. You sure can’t compare Vegas 2 with a real Tom Clancy theatrical outcome, but it sure can keep you sufficiently riveted to play the game. One other thing; quite frankly, I don’t think the single player is the star in this game; I’d go for the multiplayer and co-op modes anytime.

In general, the presentation of the game is executed adequately well, and is much better than its predecessor. The graphics and sound components of the game, however, are a bit dismal as there are a number of graphics framework slowdowns in the game – at times, to a certain point that it categorically crawls; and the music overall is equally awful. Nothing much has changed with the gameplay either, although the running feature is unquestionably a plus. The game is outfitted with interesting maps and turns and would most likely leave players and fans craving to play more for quite some time.

To sum it up, Vegas 2 botched the chance to set itself apart from the first version. It can neither be called an expansion pack (as it is actually more than that); but nor does it feel as the full-fledged sequel that it was supposed to be. For those who are expecting a sequel that outshines the original in every way possible, just as I did; Vegas 2 is tremendously disappointing.

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Posted:
2014-11-06

butchdown

Super Gamer Dude

7.7

The "Bayonetta" franchise, developed by Platinum Games, seemed to come out of nowhere to take the gaming world by storm. The ultra violent, hyper sexualized, fantasy hack-n-slash seemed to hit all of the right notes for gamers young and old. The first "Bayonetta" game received rave reviews but it set itself up to be even more improved upon and so it seems that it was fate for "Bayonetta 2" to rise to the occasion in order to become one of the best games in the current generation. Let's look at what fans can expect out of the second installment of this critically acclaimed series.

A Brief Synopsis

While we are sure that Bayonetta will stand up to the test of time, it really doesn't set itself apart as a story driven piece of entertainment. Despite this fact the game opens in such a way so as to completely suck in fans of the original game. The game kicks off with Bayonetta and Jeanne fighting off some angels who tried to attack a city during a parade. Things go wrong and Bayonetta's friend ends up being sent to Hell. This sends Bayonetta to a sacred mountain that hides the literal Gates of Hell. Upon going in Bayonetta commits herself to saving her lost friend.

Tight Gameplay: Bayonetta 2 Revels in Blood

Perhaps there is no better time to judge the content of an action game than when you are in the middle of swinging your blade through the skull of your enemy. Were this the case then we can rest assured that "Bayonetta 2" is one of the most solid games of all time. The gameplay is slick, fast paced, and full of over the top violence. The same tight controls return for the sexual and older "Bayonetta" players will feel right at home once they start shedding the blood of the supernatural. One of the coolest new abilities that players will have at their disposal is the array of 'Torture Attacks'. If you thought beating your opponents bloody was fun wait until you have them locked in a conjured torture chamber. Pretty grisly but this game is definitely not one to pull punches.

Bayonetta 2 Moves at Full Speed

Perhaps one of the most inspiring and frustrating parts of this installment is the fact thta you are constantly moving, always on the run. "Bayonetta 2" features an array of gorgeous set pieces but they are never fully realized. The reason? We, as Bayonetta, are constantly being tugged to the next part of the level. There is no 'beaten path' to get off of here, only rails upon which to follow. Players of the game will need to quickly avail themselves to different strategies in order to cope with the pure speed of the game. Enemies come quick and character deaths come even quicker. But what can you expect from a franchise designed around mayhem?

Lots of Words, Still No Story

A brief glance at gameplay footage for "Bayonetta 2" will reveal that there isn't much of a story to follow. Sure there's some hubbub about angels and demons and mysterious forces battling one another, but players will soon grow deaf to the shlocky plot. All the story does is propel us ever deeper into more and more astounding set pieces. One moment we are fighting on top of a jet and then the next we are watching two titans of the after life punch the hell out of each other. Does it make sense? No. Is it fun? absolutely.

Refreshing Design and Incredible Graphics

"Bayonetta 2" is particularly strong in regards to the sheer graphical prowess of the game. Character models are typically sharp and expressive while the set pieces at times are breath taking. Our lead heroine, Bayonetta, looks sexy and dangerous all at the same time. The colors are used in the game to perfection and are often color coded to perfectly fit the mood of the show playing out before us.

"Bayonetta 2" is THE Action Game Of Our Generation

The 'hack n slash' genre is typically pretty disrespected by critics. Most critics find the genre 'too easy' to develop which causes an influx of subpar games. "Bayonetta 2" is far from subpar. The game may very well have set the standard for what to expect out of our action games of the future. "Bayonetta 2" is worth picking up by anyone with the desire to get lost in a beautiful, violent, and addicting game world.

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Posted:
2010-12-05

butchdown

Super Gamer Dude

7.8

This is a most unlikely story, hopefully an impossible future scenario where, as a result of disaster after disaster, America is an impoverished nation and North Korea is a world power. The Korean forces have attacked and occupied a large part of the US, via Hawaii and San Francisco, halting at the Mississippi.

The game begins with an American ex combat pilot being dragged from his house and thrown onto a bus, with other detainees, on a journey to an interrogation centre in Korean military occupied territory, you take his part. As you can imagine there is a feast of atrocities perpetrated on American civilians witnessed from the bus on the way there. These are the sort of inhuman treatments you are used to seeing footage of in third world countries, but even worse and far more graphically bloody.

Now captive, in your own country, deep behind enemy lines, the resistance forces decide you must be rescued. A pair of resistance fighters are sent in and accompany you through suburban America, leading you to a safe house. The fights you take part in are a team effort with your partners actually killing things and calling out targets for you to fire at.

There is a lot going on with assorted actions on several levels, varying in dimension from a siege in a ordinary town house to a fight against overwhelming odds out in the open, with continuous action but with firefights not too long to become boring. Each setting has an atmospheric feel about it, carefully thought out to fit the overall idea of a foreign occupation. Propaganda broadcasts and posters are ever present, the roads are almost empty of the endemic population and all around is the wreckage of hardware demolished by the advanced Korean weaponry. The Mississippi has been rendered radioactive to from a barrier between the occupied and free areas of the country.

This sets the tone of the game and it remains to see what the finished product is like, but it promises to be quite an experience.

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Posted:
2010-12-12

butchdown

Super Gamer Dude

7.9

Question. Where do you start to describe a game as complex as this one with its many subplots and follow on plots from previous titles? Answer. You don't; time is too short to do so in anything but vague outline. The rise and fall of the city of Rome is the main story followed by Brotherhood. The game begins with the politically powerful and scheming Borgias, related to the pope of the time, having designs on expanding their influence in Rome and spreading it to other cities. Your job is to defend against this, but at first you fail in doing so, setting the scene for the game proper.

Then follows a set of varied scenaios ranging from multi combats to assassinations and sword-to-sword duelling. Enemies in this game are now more aggressive than in the previous titles, requiring you to be more prepared to lauch pre-emptive strikes. The game is not very different to any of the earlier titles and retains its focus on Ezio, the hero of the series, for the most part. The puzzles play a much smaller part and consequently there are fewer of them. It also adopts one of the most interesting multiplayer concepts around. Each six-player, 10-minute session has you in dual roles as an assassin and an assassin's target. Successful assassinations earn points; how
many points depends on your method. It's a game of hide and seek, implemented to perfection.

There are a couple of bugs but these are not deal breakers, and regardless of any shortcomings, Brotherhood's success comes from taking what made Asassins Creed 2 work and making it a less disjointed story and more cinematic in its look and feel. The makers' real aim seems to have been perfecting what is already good. There is not too much new here, but there are great improvements to what was there before. This is a superior game over its predecessors and very well worth investing in.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-08-25

butchdown

Super Gamer Dude

This is a most unlikely story, hopefully an impossible future scenario where, as a result of disaster after disaster, America is an impoverished nation and North Korea is a world power. The Korean forces have attacked and occupied a large part of the US, via Hawaii and San Francisco, halting at the Mississippi.

The game begins with an American ex combat pilot being dragged from his house and thrown onto a bus, with other detainees, on a journey to an interrogation centre in Korean military occupied territory, you take his part. As you can imagine there is a feast of atrocities perpetrated on American civilians witnessed from the bus on the way there. These are the sort of inhuman treatments you are used to seeing footage of in third world countries, but even worse and far more graphically bloody.

Now captive, in your own country, deep behind enemy lines, the resistance forces decide you must be rescued. A pair of resistance fighters are sent in and accompany you through suburban America, leading you to a safe house. The fights you take part in are a team effort with your partners actually killing things and calling out targets for you to fire at.

There is a lot going on with assorted actions on several levels, varying in dimension from a siege in a ordinary town house to a fight against overwhelming odds out in the open, with continuous action but with firefights not too long to become boring. Each setting has an atmospheric feel about it, carefully thought out to fit the overall idea of a foreign occupation. Propaganda broadcasts and posters are ever present, the roads are almost empty of the endemic population and all around is the wreckage of hardware demolished by the advanced Korean weaponry. The Mississippi has been rendered radioactive to from a barrier between the occupied and free areas of the country.

This sets the tone of the game and it remains to see what the finished product is like, but it promises to be quite an experience.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-02

butchdown

Super Gamer Dude

7.1

First things first, if you're such a fan of J.R.R. Tolkien's defining masterpieces of fantasy fiction that you call them the "legendarium," Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor, with its bro dude plot of a ranger who fights for revenge after a botched sacrifice attempt lets Celebrimbor possess his body as a wraith, is likely to make you give an evil eye to the game that can rival Sauron's. However, if all you know of Middle-Earth is general approval of the movies, and you're the type of gamer who can remember the days of the 90s when you could rent nondescript action games like Chakan or Journey to Silius to win them in a weekend, never looking back, then Shadow of Mordor might be a brief ride of fun before you feast yourself on the other main attractions coming out.

It certainly plays the role of an action game with slight RPG elements well enough, liberally poaching from popular games of recent years. You've got your Assassin's Creed-like movement and stealth (courtesy of aforementioned Celebrimbor). You've got some combat ideas literally stolen from Rocksteady's Batman games. You've got your fast travel here, your level up skills there, and combo-based fighting everywhere. At least there's not much "bring me my helmet, I forgot it at the brothel" type of side quests common to this type of game.

Instead, a great bulk of the game's play revolves around playing political mind games with Orcs and Uruk (who are like super orcs). Imagine that Mordor, the deadly, vile land of Sauron is like the United States, with Orc Democrats and Uruk Republicans fighting for control and honor whether you fight them or not. They upend districts or take the reins of the Orc Senate or House one by one. This means that there is a constant shifting of power behind the scenes. The Big Bad who remains at a fixed portion of the game to become a boss battle is little seen here.

Against this backdrop, you can affect the balance of power by using stealth to gather information, and set up ambushes, which will then have the effect of putting somebody else into power, and so on. It's the one shining original element of the game that is genuinely compelling to follow and play with. One time, just to play around, I intentionally lost and redid a section of the game, only to find a different set of Orc chiefs to feast upon, even with different dialogue!

Unfortunately, the combat tends to undo much of the satisfaction for this clever system, at least if you're the kind of dedicated gamer who mastered games like Bayonetta or Dark Souls. At times, it is enough to simply pound away on one button. All the automated combos and evasion techniques come into play so easily that your enemies can't touch you. This gets worse as the game continues, and Talion becomes stronger than any force in Middle-Earth. If there was more of a challenge to influencing the power dynamics, the game would be a great deal stronger. Still, for players who tend to die a lot in a Mario game, this one might provide a strong enough play experience.

While they draw heavily from the movies and it is littered with references to the source material (oddly enough, for how it walks all over them), there is also little to distinguish it from dozens of other grim hack and slash fantasy games. The aesthetics of the game are lovely and intricate, but The Lord of the Rings ended up influencing the creators of Dungeons & Dragons, whose own creation served as inspiration for countless video games. It takes a lot more than just sprinkling bits of Tolkien here and there to make the experience stand out. Very few of the many iconic parts of Tolkien's fantasy are at play here. Indeed, some of the downloadable for-pay extra missions are likely to enrage fans who take the appendices seriously.

In the end, if renting were as popular as it once was, it would be worth a good weekend and not much else. Shadow of Mordor just can't escape the shadow of its betters, which include the source material.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-02

butchdown

Super Gamer Dude

7.1

First things first, if you're such a fan of J.R.R. Tolkien's defining masterpieces of fantasy fiction that you call them the "legendarium," Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor, with its bro dude plot of a ranger who fights for revenge after a botched sacrifice attempt lets Celebrimbor possess his body as a wraith, is likely to make you give an evil eye to the game that can rival Sauron's. However, if all you know of Middle-Earth is general approval of the movies, and you're the type of gamer who can remember the days of the 90s when you could rent nondescript action games like Chakan or Journey to Silius to win them in a weekend, never looking back, then Shadow of Mordor might be a brief ride of fun before you feast yourself on the other main attractions coming out.

It certainly plays the role of an action game with slight RPG elements well enough, liberally poaching from popular games of recent years. You've got your Assassin's Creed-like movement and stealth (courtesy of aforementioned Celebrimbor). You've got some combat ideas literally stolen from Rocksteady's Batman games. You've got your fast travel here, your level up skills there, and combo-based fighting everywhere. At least there's not much "bring me my helmet, I forgot it at the brothel" type of side quests common to this type of game.

Instead, a great bulk of the game's play revolves around playing political mind games with Orcs and Uruk (who are like super orcs). Imagine that Mordor, the deadly, vile land of Sauron is like the United States, with Orc Democrats and Uruk Republicans fighting for control and honor whether you fight them or not. They upend districts or take the reins of the Orc Senate or House one by one. This means that there is a constant shifting of power behind the scenes. The Big Bad who remains at a fixed portion of the game to become a boss battle is little seen here.

Against this backdrop, you can affect the balance of power by using stealth to gather information, and set up ambushes, which will then have the effect of putting somebody else into power, and so on. It's the one shining original element of the game that is genuinely compelling to follow and play with. One time, just to play around, I intentionally lost and redid a section of the game, only to find a different set of Orc chiefs to feast upon, even with different dialogue!

Unfortunately, the combat tends to undo much of the satisfaction for this clever system, at least if you're the kind of dedicated gamer who mastered games like Bayonetta or Dark Souls. At times, it is enough to simply pound away on one button. All the automated combos and evasion techniques come into play so easily that your enemies can't touch you. This gets worse as the game continues, and Talion becomes stronger than any force in Middle-Earth. If there was more of a challenge to influencing the power dynamics, the game would be a great deal stronger. Still, for players who tend to die a lot in a Mario game, this one might provide a strong enough play experience.

While they draw heavily from the movies and it is littered with references to the source material (oddly enough, for how it walks all over them), there is also little to distinguish it from dozens of other grim hack and slash fantasy games. The aesthetics of the game are lovely and intricate, but The Lord of the Rings ended up influencing the creators of Dungeons & Dragons, whose own creation served as inspiration for countless video games. It takes a lot more than just sprinkling bits of Tolkien here and there to make the experience stand out. Very few of the many iconic parts of Tolkien's fantasy are at play here. Indeed, some of the downloadable for-pay extra missions are likely to enrage fans who take the appendices seriously.

In the end, if renting were as popular as it once was, it would be worth a good weekend and not much else. Shadow of Mordor just can't escape the shadow of its betters, which include the source material.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-02

butchdown

Super Gamer Dude

7.1

First things first, if you're such a fan of J.R.R. Tolkien's defining masterpieces of fantasy fiction that you call them the "legendarium," Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor, with its bro dude plot of a ranger who fights for revenge after a botched sacrifice attempt lets Celebrimbor possess his body as a wraith, is likely to make you give an evil eye to the game that can rival Sauron's. However, if all you know of Middle-Earth is general approval of the movies, and you're the type of gamer who can remember the days of the 90s when you could rent nondescript action games like Chakan or Journey to Silius to win them in a weekend, never looking back, then Shadow of Mordor might be a brief ride of fun before you feast yourself on the other main attractions coming out.

It certainly plays the role of an action game with slight RPG elements well enough, liberally poaching from popular games of recent years. You've got your Assassin's Creed-like movement and stealth (courtesy of aforementioned Celebrimbor). You've got some combat ideas literally stolen from Rocksteady's Batman games. You've got your fast travel here, your level up skills there, and combo-based fighting everywhere. At least there's not much "bring me my helmet, I forgot it at the brothel" type of side quests common to this type of game.

Instead, a great bulk of the game's play revolves around playing political mind games with Orcs and Uruk (who are like super orcs). Imagine that Mordor, the deadly, vile land of Sauron is like the United States, with Orc Democrats and Uruk Republicans fighting for control and honor whether you fight them or not. They upend districts or take the reins of the Orc Senate or House one by one. This means that there is a constant shifting of power behind the scenes. The Big Bad who remains at a fixed portion of the game to become a boss battle is little seen here.

Against this backdrop, you can affect the balance of power by using stealth to gather information, and set up ambushes, which will then have the effect of putting somebody else into power, and so on. It's the one shining original element of the game that is genuinely compelling to follow and play with. One time, just to play around, I intentionally lost and redid a section of the game, only to find a different set of Orc chiefs to feast upon, even with different dialogue!

Unfortunately, the combat tends to undo much of the satisfaction for this clever system, at least if you're the kind of dedicated gamer who mastered games like Bayonetta or Dark Souls. At times, it is enough to simply pound away on one button. All the automated combos and evasion techniques come into play so easily that your enemies can't touch you. This gets worse as the game continues, and Talion becomes stronger than any force in Middle-Earth. If there was more of a challenge to influencing the power dynamics, the game would be a great deal stronger. Still, for players who tend to die a lot in a Mario game, this one might provide a strong enough play experience.

While they draw heavily from the movies and it is littered with references to the source material (oddly enough, for how it walks all over them), there is also little to distinguish it from dozens of other grim hack and slash fantasy games. The aesthetics of the game are lovely and intricate, but The Lord of the Rings ended up influencing the creators of Dungeons & Dragons, whose own creation served as inspiration for countless video games. It takes a lot more than just sprinkling bits of Tolkien here and there to make the experience stand out. Very few of the many iconic parts of Tolkien's fantasy are at play here. Indeed, some of the downloadable for-pay extra missions are likely to enrage fans who take the appendices seriously.

In the end, if renting were as popular as it once was, it would be worth a good weekend and not much else. Shadow of Mordor just can't escape the shadow of its betters, which include the source material.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-02

butchdown

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

Video games are often tasked with the job to perfectly replicate some portion of reality in a fun and exciting way. Sports games, in particular, have to be on the nose with their technical voracity and that is why it is so common to see 'realistic' racing games fail. They just don't cut it the way that they need to. This is not a problem that 'F1 2014' will have to deal with. 'F1 2014' is a racing simulator developed by Codemasters and based off of the latest season of Formula One racing. The game does a ton of things well and will more than find a home in consoles of racing fans everywhere, it will become a staple.

F1 2014 - Graphics To Drool Over

'F1 2014' was released on last generation technology, the Xbox 360 and PS3, yet it still has the sort of graphic quality that pushes the envelope. The cars we get to use are lifelike recreations that are loyal down to the smallest of details. We can see how gamers with large televisions could easily get lost in the way the game presents itself. The colors of the different cars and stadiums pop and add to the overall impressive feel of the video game

Getting Start as a Formula One Racer

When players boot up 'F1 2014' for the first time they will be greeted by a little program called the 'Driver Evaluation Test'. Here new users will take to the roads of Monza in order to find out exactly what their gameplay settings should be set too. Of course you can skip this test and instead choose your own difficulty settings, thus disregarding the need to take the test to begin with. This mini game to start the game really helps new users get going before they really start driving in important races. Another way that F1 tries to help its new users is through the invention of their new 'Very Easy' AI setting. This setting had not been in last seasons release. Unlimited Flashbacks, which help you undo mess ups on the track, have also been added. This is a great way to retry a troublesome prat of your race without getting sent all the way back to the beginning.

Tight Controls for a Tight Race

F1's newest line up of cars are much different than their last iteration. Gone are the super stylish, sleek and easy to control cars. Instead users will be using cars that just aren't as agile as they are used to. Instead there is more power under the hood and a little more 'oomph' behind every twist and turn on the race. The rest of the controls are unchanged so fans should be able to leap right into the race and make some good things happen.

Inconsistent AI Makes For Frustration

When we spend our time watching F1 racing on television we get used to the idea of talented competitors doing everything they can to pull out a win on the asphalt. So why can't we experience that same thrill in a racing game like F1? The truth is pretty simple: the AI cars are nowhere near well made enough to replicate quality racing. The AI cars, regardless of difficulty, do not try to defend themselves during the race. They constantly defer and will try to move out of the way if they can feel your car pressing from the back. This lack of defensive driving serves to take us out of the game, even if it is just for a little bit.

Same Old Quality Gameplay Modes

The heart and soul of any racing game has to be it's Career Mode and the same goes for 'F1 2014'. In 'F1' you can set yourself up in 7 or 12 race seasons. These seasons follow a fixed schedule and cannot be changed. The one change that is notable is that you can find yourself on any team when you first start off. You aren't pushed onto a lower team just so you have to work your way up, not anymore. Scenario Mode places you in the shoes of other famous drivers before you while Classic Racing Mode has been completely removed.

'F1 2014' is an enjoyable racing game for last gen gamers. While it won't hold up long term in the graphical department, especially when compared to the Xbox One, it still looks and feels like a well polished AAA game.


  Viewing Reviews 1-10 of 23