User Reviews

19 Reviews


  Viewing Reviews 1-10 of 19
avatar name

Posted:
2012-10-12

scrogg

Super Gamer Dude

6.4

You get even the best package by buying on the Nintendo DS with the two-game compilation of Ultimate Mortal Kombat 3 and Puzzle Kombat, which acts as an extra in the Mortal Kombat: Deception.

In the MK series, Ultimate Mortal Kombat 3 was the latest 2D game and in fact, the fastest of the cluster. Among the great things about Ultimate MK 3 is that there is a run button, boost up combo system, and a number of exciting characters. All packed with fun at the same time maintaining the digital and photographic look of the game. The characters’ move even got interesting along with animations, leaving usual fatalities, banality, and damage. Fatalities and action moves have even become more wild and extreme. However, Ultimate MK 3 is not as serious and fatal as the previous MK games. Instead, this series is goofier, fun, and way better among the 2D fighters in its contemporary.

On the other hand, there is a big catch to the Ultimate MK 3. The MK series has been encumbered as among the worst computer fighters in the history of the game’s genre. In however easy the previous fights were, the artificial intelligence always resorts to the win mode and will eventually react to each single thing. The very realistic way to achieve triumph in this game is to exploit the game’s reactive nature and having to trick it.

Moreover, you can always play on multiplayer against the other person with the use of a single copy of the game but the characters will be limited. Thus, this is not really feasible for the prolonged excitement. You will also need two game copies for you to play it correctly, and better yet, you can also play the game online. Particularly, the online computer mode will work really well and the matches with against other opponents are actually without distinct latency. The game also keeps track of the rating and the score, as well as your losses and wins. There is also a match-up opportunity against your friends through the basic friend-code system and jump next to random players which can also be applied to the Puzzle Kombat.

Lastly, the Puzzle Kombat forms a blocks-and-crash-gems puzzle game. It is even an effective rip-off Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo. Mortal Kombat combatants can even pull out various special moves through filling a meter. These special moves will also include the ability to mess up the pit of your opponent. Although the puzzle game can be quite boring, this will be your bonus to the Mortal Kombat: Deception which is the part of the game but just with various modes.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-26

scrogg

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

At some point in the past, when the first LEGO Star Wars game was released, we would have dropped the LEGO games into another genre of video games, probably in with 3D platformers or something like that. Today, there have been so many LEGO games released that the series has practically become a genre unto itself.

These days, everyone knows what to expect when they get a LEGO game. The games are co-op centric, require the collection of a massive amount of currency in the form of studs to unlock new characters and fun collectibles. There have of course been minor changes to the formula over the years, such as the addition of an open world and allowing LEGO figures to finally speak out loud, but the games have mostly remained the same.

Sadly, The LEGO Movie Videogame continues this trend. While this latest entry in the LEGO series of games adds a few new gameplay features such as a new pick-the-brick building mechanic and a rather dull hacking minigame. Other than those tiny additions that are used sparingly throughout the game, The LEGO Movie Videogame remains the same LEGO game you've been playing for quite a few years now.

That said, one of the things that made past LEGO videogames so interesting was the conversion of a piece of media such as Star Wars, Harry Potter, or Lord of the Rings that you are so used to seeing in film into the LEGO form. Making that leap always created a large number of comedic opportunities that the game would capitalize on.

By simply making a game out of something that was already made of LEGOs, like The LEGO Movie, you lose the comedy of the transition. That is not to say that this game isn't funny, it has a ton of great moments, but every single one of those moments was present in the movie. Moreover, this game is almost exactly the movie. You absolutely need to see the film first if you don't want every single plot point spoiled for you in a short time span.

While the plot and comedy bits may not be as original as past games, the visual style does stand out, even among other LEGO games. Just like the film, the game very much still looks like it is still made of LEGO bricks while still having its own unique look and feel.

As far as visual differences between different consoles go, the Xbox 360, Xbox One, PS3 and PS4 versions are all more or less identical. The graphics do look a little sharper on Xbox One, PS4, and PC, but not really at a level where it's all that notable.

The portable versions of the game on 3DS and Vita are completely different from the console and PC versions of the game as usual, but if you've played the portable versions before you pretty much know what to expect.

At the end of the day, if you're looking for a LEGO game to break the mould and really try something exciting and new - that's not here. If you're looking for something to add on to the experience of the movie with some more story and fun additions to the plot, that's not here either. Everything in The LEGO Movie Videogame is something that you more than likely already expect. However, if you're looking for a fun co-op game in the vein of all the other LEGO games that have come before, this is very much that. No matter how tired the formula gets over the years, these remain fun.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-26

scrogg

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

At some point in the past, when the first LEGO Star Wars game was released, we would have dropped the LEGO games into another genre of video games, probably in with 3D platformers or something like that. Today, there have been so many LEGO games released that the series has practically become a genre unto itself.

These days, everyone knows what to expect when they get a LEGO game. The games are co-op centric, require the collection of a massive amount of currency in the form of studs to unlock new characters and fun collectibles. There have of course been minor changes to the formula over the years, such as the addition of an open world and allowing LEGO figures to finally speak out loud, but the games have mostly remained the same.

Sadly, The LEGO Movie Videogame continues this trend. While this latest entry in the LEGO series of games adds a few new gameplay features such as a new pick-the-brick building mechanic and a rather dull hacking minigame. Other than those tiny additions that are used sparingly throughout the game, The LEGO Movie Videogame remains the same LEGO game you've been playing for quite a few years now.

That said, one of the things that made past LEGO videogames so interesting was the conversion of a piece of media such as Star Wars, Harry Potter, or Lord of the Rings that you are so used to seeing in film into the LEGO form. Making that leap always created a large number of comedic opportunities that the game would capitalize on.

By simply making a game out of something that was already made of LEGOs, like The LEGO Movie, you lose the comedy of the transition. That is not to say that this game isn't funny, it has a ton of great moments, but every single one of those moments was present in the movie. Moreover, this game is almost exactly the movie. You absolutely need to see the film first if you don't want every single plot point spoiled for you in a short time span.

While the plot and comedy bits may not be as original as past games, the visual style does stand out, even among other LEGO games. Just like the film, the game very much still looks like it is still made of LEGO bricks while still having its own unique look and feel.

As far as visual differences between different consoles go, the Xbox 360, Xbox One, PS3 and PS4 versions are all more or less identical. The graphics do look a little sharper on Xbox One, PS4, and PC, but not really at a level where it's all that notable.

The portable versions of the game on 3DS and Vita are completely different from the console and PC versions of the game as usual, but if you've played the portable versions before you pretty much know what to expect.

At the end of the day, if you're looking for a LEGO game to break the mould and really try something exciting and new - that's not here. If you're looking for something to add on to the experience of the movie with some more story and fun additions to the plot, that's not here either. Everything in The LEGO Movie Videogame is something that you more than likely already expect. However, if you're looking for a fun co-op game in the vein of all the other LEGO games that have come before, this is very much that. No matter how tired the formula gets over the years, these remain fun.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-26

scrogg

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

At some point in the past, when the first LEGO Star Wars game was released, we would have dropped the LEGO games into another genre of video games, probably in with 3D platformers or something like that. Today, there have been so many LEGO games released that the series has practically become a genre unto itself.

These days, everyone knows what to expect when they get a LEGO game. The games are co-op centric, require the collection of a massive amount of currency in the form of studs to unlock new characters and fun collectibles. There have of course been minor changes to the formula over the years, such as the addition of an open world and allowing LEGO figures to finally speak out loud, but the games have mostly remained the same.

Sadly, The LEGO Movie Videogame continues this trend. While this latest entry in the LEGO series of games adds a few new gameplay features such as a new pick-the-brick building mechanic and a rather dull hacking minigame. Other than those tiny additions that are used sparingly throughout the game, The LEGO Movie Videogame remains the same LEGO game you've been playing for quite a few years now.

That said, one of the things that made past LEGO videogames so interesting was the conversion of a piece of media such as Star Wars, Harry Potter, or Lord of the Rings that you are so used to seeing in film into the LEGO form. Making that leap always created a large number of comedic opportunities that the game would capitalize on.

By simply making a game out of something that was already made of LEGOs, like The LEGO Movie, you lose the comedy of the transition. That is not to say that this game isn't funny, it has a ton of great moments, but every single one of those moments was present in the movie. Moreover, this game is almost exactly the movie. You absolutely need to see the film first if you don't want every single plot point spoiled for you in a short time span.

While the plot and comedy bits may not be as original as past games, the visual style does stand out, even among other LEGO games. Just like the film, the game very much still looks like it is still made of LEGO bricks while still having its own unique look and feel.

As far as visual differences between different consoles go, the Xbox 360, Xbox One, PS3 and PS4 versions are all more or less identical. The graphics do look a little sharper on Xbox One, PS4, and PC, but not really at a level where it's all that notable.

The portable versions of the game on 3DS and Vita are completely different from the console and PC versions of the game as usual, but if you've played the portable versions before you pretty much know what to expect.

At the end of the day, if you're looking for a LEGO game to break the mould and really try something exciting and new - that's not here. If you're looking for something to add on to the experience of the movie with some more story and fun additions to the plot, that's not here either. Everything in The LEGO Movie Videogame is something that you more than likely already expect. However, if you're looking for a fun co-op game in the vein of all the other LEGO games that have come before, this is very much that. No matter how tired the formula gets over the years, these remain fun.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-26

scrogg

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

At some point in the past, when the first LEGO Star Wars game was released, we would have dropped the LEGO games into another genre of video games, probably in with 3D platformers or something like that. Today, there have been so many LEGO games released that the series has practically become a genre unto itself.

These days, everyone knows what to expect when they get a LEGO game. The games are co-op centric, require the collection of a massive amount of currency in the form of studs to unlock new characters and fun collectibles. There have of course been minor changes to the formula over the years, such as the addition of an open world and allowing LEGO figures to finally speak out loud, but the games have mostly remained the same.

Sadly, The LEGO Movie Videogame continues this trend. While this latest entry in the LEGO series of games adds a few new gameplay features such as a new pick-the-brick building mechanic and a rather dull hacking minigame. Other than those tiny additions that are used sparingly throughout the game, The LEGO Movie Videogame remains the same LEGO game you've been playing for quite a few years now.

That said, one of the things that made past LEGO videogames so interesting was the conversion of a piece of media such as Star Wars, Harry Potter, or Lord of the Rings that you are so used to seeing in film into the LEGO form. Making that leap always created a large number of comedic opportunities that the game would capitalize on.

By simply making a game out of something that was already made of LEGOs, like The LEGO Movie, you lose the comedy of the transition. That is not to say that this game isn't funny, it has a ton of great moments, but every single one of those moments was present in the movie. Moreover, this game is almost exactly the movie. You absolutely need to see the film first if you don't want every single plot point spoiled for you in a short time span.

While the plot and comedy bits may not be as original as past games, the visual style does stand out, even among other LEGO games. Just like the film, the game very much still looks like it is still made of LEGO bricks while still having its own unique look and feel.

As far as visual differences between different consoles go, the Xbox 360, Xbox One, PS3 and PS4 versions are all more or less identical. The graphics do look a little sharper on Xbox One, PS4, and PC, but not really at a level where it's all that notable.

The portable versions of the game on 3DS and Vita are completely different from the console and PC versions of the game as usual, but if you've played the portable versions before you pretty much know what to expect.

At the end of the day, if you're looking for a LEGO game to break the mould and really try something exciting and new - that's not here. If you're looking for something to add on to the experience of the movie with some more story and fun additions to the plot, that's not here either. Everything in The LEGO Movie Videogame is something that you more than likely already expect. However, if you're looking for a fun co-op game in the vein of all the other LEGO games that have come before, this is very much that. No matter how tired the formula gets over the years, these remain fun.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-26

scrogg

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

At some point in the past, when the first LEGO Star Wars game was released, we would have dropped the LEGO games into another genre of video games, probably in with 3D platformers or something like that. Today, there have been so many LEGO games released that the series has practically become a genre unto itself.

These days, everyone knows what to expect when they get a LEGO game. The games are co-op centric, require the collection of a massive amount of currency in the form of studs to unlock new characters and fun collectibles. There have of course been minor changes to the formula over the years, such as the addition of an open world and allowing LEGO figures to finally speak out loud, but the games have mostly remained the same.

Sadly, The LEGO Movie Videogame continues this trend. While this latest entry in the LEGO series of games adds a few new gameplay features such as a new pick-the-brick building mechanic and a rather dull hacking minigame. Other than those tiny additions that are used sparingly throughout the game, The LEGO Movie Videogame remains the same LEGO game you've been playing for quite a few years now.

That said, one of the things that made past LEGO videogames so interesting was the conversion of a piece of media such as Star Wars, Harry Potter, or Lord of the Rings that you are so used to seeing in film into the LEGO form. Making that leap always created a large number of comedic opportunities that the game would capitalize on.

By simply making a game out of something that was already made of LEGOs, like The LEGO Movie, you lose the comedy of the transition. That is not to say that this game isn't funny, it has a ton of great moments, but every single one of those moments was present in the movie. Moreover, this game is almost exactly the movie. You absolutely need to see the film first if you don't want every single plot point spoiled for you in a short time span.

While the plot and comedy bits may not be as original as past games, the visual style does stand out, even among other LEGO games. Just like the film, the game very much still looks like it is still made of LEGO bricks while still having its own unique look and feel.

As far as visual differences between different consoles go, the Xbox 360, Xbox One, PS3 and PS4 versions are all more or less identical. The graphics do look a little sharper on Xbox One, PS4, and PC, but not really at a level where it's all that notable.

The portable versions of the game on 3DS and Vita are completely different from the console and PC versions of the game as usual, but if you've played the portable versions before you pretty much know what to expect.

At the end of the day, if you're looking for a LEGO game to break the mould and really try something exciting and new - that's not here. If you're looking for something to add on to the experience of the movie with some more story and fun additions to the plot, that's not here either. Everything in The LEGO Movie Videogame is something that you more than likely already expect. However, if you're looking for a fun co-op game in the vein of all the other LEGO games that have come before, this is very much that. No matter how tired the formula gets over the years, these remain fun.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-06-11

New Order is a game worthy of its namesake.

scrogg

Super Gamer Dude

8.0

Hailed as one of the pioneers of the FPS genre, the original Wolfenstein is an antiquated but charming piece of gaming history. With its narrow corridors, bevy of secrets, and big gun gameplay, it still manages to entertain some 20+ years later. However, while the game certainly elicits fond memories from older gamers, its brother title Doom holds higher court from a historical perspective. Nonetheless, both series have remained relevant, and both have managed to evolve uniquely from their simpler beginnings.

Wolfenstein The New Order marks the first entry in the series since the very underrated 2009 Raven title. Developer MachineGames (made up of ex-Starbreeze developers) are new to the party, but their foray blends an expertise in FPS storytelling alongside the strong gunplay associated with the namesake. While the omission of the series' formidable multiplayer is questionable, the single-player campaign here manages to meet the challenge of being worth the $60 investment.

Series regulars will be familiar with the name BJ Blazcowicz, who once again stars as the protagonist. He's much more fleshed out in this entry, and is given a compelling portrait across the post-WWII world that invests us in his trajectory and triumph. Notably, MachineGames has rewritten history, and the game's universe thrusts us into a world where the Nazis have not only emerged victorious from World War II, but they've completely decimated the world over. It's a frightening dystopia, but effectively and oppressively realized by the developers and it becomes a character itself as the story unfolds. As well, there's a large, and game-shaping decision made very early on that incentivizes players to replay the story, and it strongly alters the experience depending on the decision made.

Focusing on the gameplay, the title focuses itself on a mix of old-school gunplay and simple, but effective stealth mechanics. These are both managed by a meaningful and well-implemented skill system that demands players explore different methods of taking out enemies, while successfully making players feel more immersed. There's four separate ladders/trees to max out, and each one gives the players a sense of increasing power that makes them essential to furthering the experience.

The gunplay itself is impactful, and like Raven's 2009 venture, wholly satisfying. There's a distinctly old-school wallop packed into each one, and as ammo is made about pickups and can feel scarce on higher difficulties, the experience tinges towards the survival-horror genre. MachineGames has also nailed the stage design too; mixing corridors and open-areas effectively, and giving players set-pieces that integrate organically into the experience. Across the 12-hour campaign, I never felt like I was backtracking or experiencing the same fight, and as my skill set broadened I felt like my BJ Blazcowicz was becoming the consummate Nazi-killing badass. If there was any real complaint to make about the base gunplay, it would be unnecessary inclusion of dual-wielding. It feels more cumbersome than threat-improving, and it seems pointless given that it's less effective than using one weapon or perhaps employing stealth.

Speaking of stealth, players are given knives, a silenced pistol, and some melee attacks to artfully move through the environments. It's kept rudimentary but nonetheless rewards players that choose the more careful approach (with character improvements and fewer enemies to combat). It mixes exceptionally well within the level design too, and feels like a defining trait of the experience that will allow it to linger in gamers' memories longer.

On the whole, the strengths of Wolfenstein's gameplay, paired with high production values and a surprisingly effective story make it stand out. Even with the painful omission of multiplayer, The New Order is a $60 investment worth making and it offers gamers a highly-polished and satisfying FPS experience. While it might not have the longevity promise of some multiplayer-focused titles, its open skill system and decision-altering narrative make it worthy of multiple playthroughs. As it is, Wolfenstein The New Order is a game worthy of its namesake, and it stands out as a perfectly and uniquely old-school experience in a market full of iterative shooters.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-06-11

New Order is a game worthy of its namesake.

scrogg

Super Gamer Dude

8.0

Hailed as one of the pioneers of the FPS genre, the original Wolfenstein is an antiquated but charming piece of gaming history. With its narrow corridors, bevy of secrets, and big gun gameplay, it still manages to entertain some 20+ years later. However, while the game certainly elicits fond memories from older gamers, its brother title Doom holds higher court from a historical perspective. Nonetheless, both series have remained relevant, and both have managed to evolve uniquely from their simpler beginnings.

Wolfenstein The New Order marks the first entry in the series since the very underrated 2009 Raven title. Developer MachineGames (made up of ex-Starbreeze developers) are new to the party, but their foray blends an expertise in FPS storytelling alongside the strong gunplay associated with the namesake. While the omission of the series' formidable multiplayer is questionable, the single-player campaign here manages to meet the challenge of being worth the $60 investment.

Series regulars will be familiar with the name BJ Blazcowicz, who once again stars as the protagonist. He's much more fleshed out in this entry, and is given a compelling portrait across the post-WWII world that invests us in his trajectory and triumph. Notably, MachineGames has rewritten history, and the game's universe thrusts us into a world where the Nazis have not only emerged victorious from World War II, but they've completely decimated the world over. It's a frightening dystopia, but effectively and oppressively realized by the developers and it becomes a character itself as the story unfolds. As well, there's a large, and game-shaping decision made very early on that incentivizes players to replay the story, and it strongly alters the experience depending on the decision made.

Focusing on the gameplay, the title focuses itself on a mix of old-school gunplay and simple, but effective stealth mechanics. These are both managed by a meaningful and well-implemented skill system that demands players explore different methods of taking out enemies, while successfully making players feel more immersed. There's four separate ladders/trees to max out, and each one gives the players a sense of increasing power that makes them essential to furthering the experience.

The gunplay itself is impactful, and like Raven's 2009 venture, wholly satisfying. There's a distinctly old-school wallop packed into each one, and as ammo is made about pickups and can feel scarce on higher difficulties, the experience tinges towards the survival-horror genre. MachineGames has also nailed the stage design too; mixing corridors and open-areas effectively, and giving players set-pieces that integrate organically into the experience. Across the 12-hour campaign, I never felt like I was backtracking or experiencing the same fight, and as my skill set broadened I felt like my BJ Blazcowicz was becoming the consummate Nazi-killing badass. If there was any real complaint to make about the base gunplay, it would be unnecessary inclusion of dual-wielding. It feels more cumbersome than threat-improving, and it seems pointless given that it's less effective than using one weapon or perhaps employing stealth.

Speaking of stealth, players are given knives, a silenced pistol, and some melee attacks to artfully move through the environments. It's kept rudimentary but nonetheless rewards players that choose the more careful approach (with character improvements and fewer enemies to combat). It mixes exceptionally well within the level design too, and feels like a defining trait of the experience that will allow it to linger in gamers' memories longer.

On the whole, the strengths of Wolfenstein's gameplay, paired with high production values and a surprisingly effective story make it stand out. Even with the painful omission of multiplayer, The New Order is a $60 investment worth making and it offers gamers a highly-polished and satisfying FPS experience. While it might not have the longevity promise of some multiplayer-focused titles, its open skill system and decision-altering narrative make it worthy of multiple playthroughs. As it is, Wolfenstein The New Order is a game worthy of its namesake, and it stands out as a perfectly and uniquely old-school experience in a market full of iterative shooters.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-06-11

New Order is a game worthy of its namesake.

scrogg

Super Gamer Dude

8.0

Hailed as one of the pioneers of the FPS genre, the original Wolfenstein is an antiquated but charming piece of gaming history. With its narrow corridors, bevy of secrets, and big gun gameplay, it still manages to entertain some 20+ years later. However, while the game certainly elicits fond memories from older gamers, its brother title Doom holds higher court from a historical perspective. Nonetheless, both series have remained relevant, and both have managed to evolve uniquely from their simpler beginnings.

Wolfenstein The New Order marks the first entry in the series since the very underrated 2009 Raven title. Developer MachineGames (made up of ex-Starbreeze developers) are new to the party, but their foray blends an expertise in FPS storytelling alongside the strong gunplay associated with the namesake. While the omission of the series' formidable multiplayer is questionable, the single-player campaign here manages to meet the challenge of being worth the $60 investment.

Series regulars will be familiar with the name BJ Blazcowicz, who once again stars as the protagonist. He's much more fleshed out in this entry, and is given a compelling portrait across the post-WWII world that invests us in his trajectory and triumph. Notably, MachineGames has rewritten history, and the game's universe thrusts us into a world where the Nazis have not only emerged victorious from World War II, but they've completely decimated the world over. It's a frightening dystopia, but effectively and oppressively realized by the developers and it becomes a character itself as the story unfolds. As well, there's a large, and game-shaping decision made very early on that incentivizes players to replay the story, and it strongly alters the experience depending on the decision made.

Focusing on the gameplay, the title focuses itself on a mix of old-school gunplay and simple, but effective stealth mechanics. These are both managed by a meaningful and well-implemented skill system that demands players explore different methods of taking out enemies, while successfully making players feel more immersed. There's four separate ladders/trees to max out, and each one gives the players a sense of increasing power that makes them essential to furthering the experience.

The gunplay itself is impactful, and like Raven's 2009 venture, wholly satisfying. There's a distinctly old-school wallop packed into each one, and as ammo is made about pickups and can feel scarce on higher difficulties, the experience tinges towards the survival-horror genre. MachineGames has also nailed the stage design too; mixing corridors and open-areas effectively, and giving players set-pieces that integrate organically into the experience. Across the 12-hour campaign, I never felt like I was backtracking or experiencing the same fight, and as my skill set broadened I felt like my BJ Blazcowicz was becoming the consummate Nazi-killing badass. If there was any real complaint to make about the base gunplay, it would be unnecessary inclusion of dual-wielding. It feels more cumbersome than threat-improving, and it seems pointless given that it's less effective than using one weapon or perhaps employing stealth.

Speaking of stealth, players are given knives, a silenced pistol, and some melee attacks to artfully move through the environments. It's kept rudimentary but nonetheless rewards players that choose the more careful approach (with character improvements and fewer enemies to combat). It mixes exceptionally well within the level design too, and feels like a defining trait of the experience that will allow it to linger in gamers' memories longer.

On the whole, the strengths of Wolfenstein's gameplay, paired with high production values and a surprisingly effective story make it stand out. Even with the painful omission of multiplayer, The New Order is a $60 investment worth making and it offers gamers a highly-polished and satisfying FPS experience. While it might not have the longevity promise of some multiplayer-focused titles, its open skill system and decision-altering narrative make it worthy of multiple playthroughs. As it is, Wolfenstein The New Order is a game worthy of its namesake, and it stands out as a perfectly and uniquely old-school experience in a market full of iterative shooters.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-06-11

New Order is a game worthy of its namesake.

scrogg

Super Gamer Dude

8.0

Hailed as one of the pioneers of the FPS genre, the original Wolfenstein is an antiquated but charming piece of gaming history. With its narrow corridors, bevy of secrets, and big gun gameplay, it still manages to entertain some 20+ years later. However, while the game certainly elicits fond memories from older gamers, its brother title Doom holds higher court from a historical perspective. Nonetheless, both series have remained relevant, and both have managed to evolve uniquely from their simpler beginnings.

Wolfenstein The New Order marks the first entry in the series since the very underrated 2009 Raven title. Developer MachineGames (made up of ex-Starbreeze developers) are new to the party, but their foray blends an expertise in FPS storytelling alongside the strong gunplay associated with the namesake. While the omission of the series' formidable multiplayer is questionable, the single-player campaign here manages to meet the challenge of being worth the $60 investment.

Series regulars will be familiar with the name BJ Blazcowicz, who once again stars as the protagonist. He's much more fleshed out in this entry, and is given a compelling portrait across the post-WWII world that invests us in his trajectory and triumph. Notably, MachineGames has rewritten history, and the game's universe thrusts us into a world where the Nazis have not only emerged victorious from World War II, but they've completely decimated the world over. It's a frightening dystopia, but effectively and oppressively realized by the developers and it becomes a character itself as the story unfolds. As well, there's a large, and game-shaping decision made very early on that incentivizes players to replay the story, and it strongly alters the experience depending on the decision made.

Focusing on the gameplay, the title focuses itself on a mix of old-school gunplay and simple, but effective stealth mechanics. These are both managed by a meaningful and well-implemented skill system that demands players explore different methods of taking out enemies, while successfully making players feel more immersed. There's four separate ladders/trees to max out, and each one gives the players a sense of increasing power that makes them essential to furthering the experience.

The gunplay itself is impactful, and like Raven's 2009 venture, wholly satisfying. There's a distinctly old-school wallop packed into each one, and as ammo is made about pickups and can feel scarce on higher difficulties, the experience tinges towards the survival-horror genre. MachineGames has also nailed the stage design too; mixing corridors and open-areas effectively, and giving players set-pieces that integrate organically into the experience. Across the 12-hour campaign, I never felt like I was backtracking or experiencing the same fight, and as my skill set broadened I felt like my BJ Blazcowicz was becoming the consummate Nazi-killing badass. If there was any real complaint to make about the base gunplay, it would be unnecessary inclusion of dual-wielding. It feels more cumbersome than threat-improving, and it seems pointless given that it's less effective than using one weapon or perhaps employing stealth.

Speaking of stealth, players are given knives, a silenced pistol, and some melee attacks to artfully move through the environments. It's kept rudimentary but nonetheless rewards players that choose the more careful approach (with character improvements and fewer enemies to combat). It mixes exceptionally well within the level design too, and feels like a defining trait of the experience that will allow it to linger in gamers' memories longer.

On the whole, the strengths of Wolfenstein's gameplay, paired with high production values and a surprisingly effective story make it stand out. Even with the painful omission of multiplayer, The New Order is a $60 investment worth making and it offers gamers a highly-polished and satisfying FPS experience. While it might not have the longevity promise of some multiplayer-focused titles, its open skill system and decision-altering narrative make it worthy of multiple playthroughs. As it is, Wolfenstein The New Order is a game worthy of its namesake, and it stands out as a perfectly and uniquely old-school experience in a market full of iterative shooters.


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