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  Viewing Reviews 1-10 of 12
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Posted:
2013-06-06

rocky8

Super Gamer Dude

8.0

The main character of the game is Yuri who is a real headache and oftentimes making troubles. In the story he lives in one of the sections in the Capital’s lower portion. In their town they have a blastia which provides them with everything they need about magic such as monster protectors and magical weapons. But someone steals the heart of the blastia and this greatly affects the town’s flow of drinking water.

Yuri decided to set a mission to follow the thief but in doing so he found himself being involved in different issues in their town. He travel in deserts and forests with his dog named Repede who is responsible for recruiting friends that go with them. As they go along, the cast of the heart of blastia mission is slowly forming. There is the innocent castle noble named Estelle and the full of drama, magic discoverer named Rita. All the member of the mission had different qualities and character which makes it an interesting team.

The game has focus on details even in the end part of every battle such as the celebration. The creator truly pays attention to every little detail. The translation is good and able to really express the emotions of the characters. With the aid of head captions the players can easily catch up and they can also select if they want to read it or not. The emotions were clearly manifested. To those new players they might find the 2D feature not blending with background but the scripts are full of humor and the story is continuously provided.

The setting and art of the game is its primary feature. The drawings are clean but with attention to details. But the wonderful setting and story are not the only good advantage of the game but also the gaming experiences are worth it. It is surely a long game to end but it constantly provides good fights and not so small town settings. The player can also choose the character of his choice, modify the character members or control the actions of the members.

Some of the game plays of other tale games are incorporated in the Tales of Vesperia. There are puzzles added to the games. The Tales of Vesperia can be closely the same with the other Tales but it surely advance in terms of settings, characters and game plays. The game only proves that even the classic games can still cope up with the time to time evolution of game consoles and will surely exceed any one’s expectation from a RPG game.

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Posted:
2012-10-12

rocky8

Super Gamer Dude

4.0

There are a number of real life athletes that are presented as playable characters in Smash Court but you are also given the option of creating your own character through an in game character creation tool. It may prove challenging to use the creation tool to make your ideal attractive athlete, but at least it gives an opportunity for couch potatoes such as yourself to bring out an active and athletic alter ego in the virtual world. You are able to customize your eyes and mouth into extreme proportions, and you even have access to strange apparel. After creating the most awesome looking athlete you could think of, you then play a match. That’s when the fun meter starts to decline. Whatever button commands you pushed, it’s not perfectly mirrored on screen.

Lobs and drops shots are just futile. Drop shots are incredibly slow. So slow that opponents could afford to take a quick nap, wake up and still be able to rush and receive it. Lobs are even worse as they mockingly float in the air giving your opponents the opportunity to return a smash. In the end, it comes down to button mashing and making sure to hit the ball and pray your opponent misses it. And often times they do. The game animation is just as lousy as the controls as they oftentimes don’t respond appropriately to the buttons you’ve pressed. There are times when your player won’t budge as your opponent returns the ball; all the while you are mashing the control button to oblivion out of desperation for your player to make a swing. It’s tolerable to see your player make a swing and miss. At least you can tell there’s effort but desperately positioning yourself to return a perfect shot and see your player not responding at such a crucial moment is just plain torture, at the least, frustrating.

Despite the crappy control and anomalous animation response, you still have big chances of winning a match. The AI players aren’t very sophisticated. They are in fact quite simple minded as they are mostly content in keeping themselves on the baseline and don’t really have the capability to come up with ulterior motives in getting a ball past you. There are surprising moments, however, when your AI opponents, right after serving, will rush to the net. You have close to zero chances of returning the ball past them because of the sloppy controls and sometimes delayed response. If you are hoping of tossing a lob, that hope will swiftly be shot down by a returning smash from your AI opponent. But alas, all hope is not lost as they aren’t very good in remembering their winning techniques, making them inconsistent in the strategies they employ. You definitely have a chance at winning.

All things considered, Smash Court Tennis 3 is just too flawed for players to achieve total satisfaction in the game. At the most, it just provide a mediocre gaming experience and at the worst, a hair-pulling frustrating one.

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Posted:
2012-10-12

rocky8

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

Right when the booming of Xbox Live was at its bloom, there has always been an option to play MotoGP. Lasting fans of the THQ's two-wheel racing series may recall a totally playable demo for the game. Since the release of the MotoGP series, game developers have built their reputation in terms of attractive graphics, handle challenges, and one of the best online racing series there is. THQ and Climax have developed another massive leap with MotoGP '07 that will still continue to gain long-time fans.

As with the last few series installments, MotoGP ’07 is fragmented into extreme mode and grand prix events. The grand prix races are held on realistic tracks which include the Misano which is new to the series. You can also choose from real-life MotoGP stars like Nicky Hayden, Valentino Rossi, Kenny Roberts, Jr., among others. In extreme mode, on the other hand, everything changes and fuels up. There are the different bikes styled in various themes, interesting fictional riders, and tracks inspired by hardcore racing environment. Races in extreme mode also tend to be quicker and more lax than the staid grand prix races.

The handling of the bike, moreover, tends to be more permissive in extreme races and of course, easy to power slide around the corners just by double-tapping the gas. However, there is one confusing aspect in bike handling that is almost noticeable especially when doing an exit from corners. You will usually see the end of the bike wagging. This is perhaps either the visual emulation of the developer or a sort of warning system to inform you when the bike's rear is about to flop. But regardless, you can still infer that the animation is just exaggerated.

You can also do offline competition with MotoGP '07, as with other game play. You will still be in for many surprises on offline competition but in certain events, you will take the checkered flag or struggle to finish on the podium against other riders.

The single-player game of MotoGP '07 surely offers interesting and worthwhile game play, right from the flexible customization options to the rewards system that allows for race-won credits like braking, acceleration, cornering, and top speed. Ultimately, MotoGP '07 offers promising quality to gamers, whether in its audio or gaming aspect.

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Posted:
2012-10-13

rocky8

Super Gamer Dude

7.6

With a World War II setting in France, the developers of the game took advantage of having an action and strategic game in one, but wasn’t able to cut it in terms of this attempt of a gameplay. Thanks to the multiplayer mode, this game can be played with fun.

3 of Europe’s braves take part on a War with the Nazis. J.D. Tyler on rifles and likes to bombard enemy vehicles, Deuce Williams on bazooka and expert on close hand combat, and there’s Tommy Mac who’s on flamethrower and gas grenades. Story goes as they are tracking down some German generals and Spiritual Leaders, ally with the Le Resistance and so forth. With a great storyline and cut scenes, a great impact in-game fillers.

Like most games you start off with the stock and not-so-reliable weapons. And as the game progresses, you’re going to get better weapons. But frustration is not far from this as well, with the lack of splash damage and bad aiming even in your talent of accuracy. You can never tell whether it’s the equipment or the game but definitely the aim is an issue, good thing there is that old school crosshair that moves on its own. And with the frustrating splash damage that was not properly calculated making a sniper out of a canon type glitch.

On single player mode, players are given easy to understand level progression where you would never be lost despite the turn of events in-game. Your characters can easily die from those accurate Nazis, but you are respawned on an earlier save point.

With the ground cover you have in game, with the armory, motor pool and radio tower, 3 soldiers isn’t enough to defeat the enemies. With FUs or field units, you can summoned through air-drop and sent down for support. And managing your support is as easy as saying destruction on demand.

Multiplayer mode with the Outfit is fun, there is death match, and capture the flag. Playable up to three-on-three. With controls as similar as single player it would be fun and a lot of maps to choose from. And there is also a single player through online and then co-op mode, which really gives a different spice in-game. Despite the graphics which is a bit boxy without the high definition and repetitive actions, the Outfit has given time and effort on giving players a chance to destroy everything in its path, well almost everything. But definitely, it’s fun blowing up things in-game.

The game has great sounds and effects to it. And the actors have been provided with the right voice to convince you they are strong fearless soldiers. But some support actors though has that fake or weak accent. Totally the Game has been saved with its multiplayer option and capability to go online, despite the single player mode which is repetitive. The game has redeemed itself. And can definitely be enjoyed with another player.

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Posted:
2012-10-17

rocky8

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

You start the game choosing from one of the five characters available, though a sixth can be unlocked later in the game. The story for each is a little bit different, but generally the same, and mostly incomprehensible. Between battles in dungeons, you’ll find idols that will allow you to rest and will provide you with equipment. While you rest, you enter a dream world, where you receive quests and the story is supposed to be explained, but it is disjointed from the rest of the occurrences in the game, and there are never any cutscenes to explain what’s going on.

Despite not having a very good idea why it is you’re running around slaughtering the denizens of this world, it’s nice that there are so many different enemies available to kill. The game has a ton of different varieties spread out through all the different dungeons. While massacring your way through their masses offers a certain visceral enjoyment, it gets pretty repetitive pretty fast.

One of the reasons that it becomes so annoyingly repetitious is that you spend so much time revisiting dungeons. The special skills that are able to be learned throughout the game are delivered in a rather unique way. In the dream world, you are given particular tasks to accomplish while you adventure. These are generally such things as killing a certain number of a certain type of creature.

When you complete it, you return to the dream world, and are rewarded with a new skill. The only problem is that you don’t know what creatures you need to focus on when you’re in a dungeon, the mission to kill that particular type usually comes a couple of dungeons down the road. So, a large part of progressing is backtracking, which is a tough thing to do when you have as much power as you do in any hack-and-slash game.

While there is something to be said for playing through the game by yourself, it’s likely to be a lot more fun playing with up to three other people. This can only be done over the Xbox Live service, however, and there is no capacity to play with multiple people on one machine. It is one issue that takes away from what the game could have offered, but at least the online experience has solid gameplay.

Overall, what Kingdom Under Fire: Circle of Doom brings to gamers is a traditional hack-and-slash system that is better at providing players with the standards of the genre than it is at pushing the boundaries that are out there.

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Posted:
2014-03-23

rocky8

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

As the latest installment in the long running Need for Speed series, Need for Speed Rivals simultaneously has a lot to live up to and a lot to prove. While the new studio developing the game, Ghost Games, might technically be a new studio they are made up of the people who worked for Criterion on Need for Speed games in the past, but that matters not, they still have to prove themselves as a worthy developer for the Need for Speed franchise.

To be sure, Ghost Games has really tried to make the series their own with Need for Speed rivals, implementing a number of new features that seem to change how the game is played completely, although the truth is a little far away from that. With Rivals, online play has become a core part of the entire game. Whenever you start up the game you are immediately forced to join a server with up to 5 other players, and put into an open world. The problem is that this world is absolutely massive, and six people cannot hope to even begin to make it feel populated.

Every once in a while you’ll zoom past another player going 200 miles per hour, but even those occurrences are rare and out of the ordinary. The fact that you’re on a server with other people never really matters until you are inevitably disconnected from it, meaning you lose all of your progress since the last time you visited a base. Honestly, after this happened a few times in quick succession, I chose to play offline instead of deal with the constant progress loss.

The game feels a whole lot like the Hot Pursuit reboot from a few years back when it comes to the actual racing. The events are split right down the middle by a distinction between racers and cops, a choice that you make right off the bat but can switch at any time.

Instead of Hot Pursuit’s strategy of using no narrative at all, Rivals weaves a strange and disturbing story about a racer who is basically an anarchist and a cop who sounds like he just wants to murder every single racer on the road. Both of these characters, which are only given silly racing names, are made to look like they are absolutely crazy, and sometimes I would often feel horrible about even playing as one of them. Neither of these characters is sympathetic in any way, and the story just feels utterly unnecessary for what still remains a very similar racing games to those in the past.

The actual driving mechanics, while virtually unchanged from past entries in the series are beginning to feel a bit stale. Every single car choice feels extremely similar if not absolutely identical in the way they handle, with each car's top speed and acceleration being the only variations.

It is rather sad that the internet issues and the other niggling issues with the game keep it from greatness. Need for Speed Rivals is an extremely fun racing game, and if you’re looking for an arcade style racer it’s still a whole lot of fun. Racing for the top of leaderboards is as fun as it ever has been, especially with the ability to race against people near you instead of just people that are on your friends list. Nonetheless, it’s hard to ignore the immense amount of wasted potential within the online features that Need for Speed Rivals promises, especially as this kind of always-on multiplayer becomes more common and more advanced.

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Posted:
2014-03-23

rocky8

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

As the latest installment in the long running Need for Speed series, Need for Speed Rivals simultaneously has a lot to live up to and a lot to prove. While the new studio developing the game, Ghost Games, might technically be a new studio they are made up of the people who worked for Criterion on Need for Speed games in the past, but that matters not, they still have to prove themselves as a worthy developer for the Need for Speed franchise.

To be sure, Ghost Games has really tried to make the series their own with Need for Speed rivals, implementing a number of new features that seem to change how the game is played completely, although the truth is a little far away from that. With Rivals, online play has become a core part of the entire game. Whenever you start up the game you are immediately forced to join a server with up to 5 other players, and put into an open world. The problem is that this world is absolutely massive, and six people cannot hope to even begin to make it feel populated.

Every once in a while you’ll zoom past another player going 200 miles per hour, but even those occurrences are rare and out of the ordinary. The fact that you’re on a server with other people never really matters until you are inevitably disconnected from it, meaning you lose all of your progress since the last time you visited a base. Honestly, after this happened a few times in quick succession, I chose to play offline instead of deal with the constant progress loss.

The game feels a whole lot like the Hot Pursuit reboot from a few years back when it comes to the actual racing. The events are split right down the middle by a distinction between racers and cops, a choice that you make right off the bat but can switch at any time.

Instead of Hot Pursuit’s strategy of using no narrative at all, Rivals weaves a strange and disturbing story about a racer who is basically an anarchist and a cop who sounds like he just wants to murder every single racer on the road. Both of these characters, which are only given silly racing names, are made to look like they are absolutely crazy, and sometimes I would often feel horrible about even playing as one of them. Neither of these characters is sympathetic in any way, and the story just feels utterly unnecessary for what still remains a very similar racing games to those in the past.

The actual driving mechanics, while virtually unchanged from past entries in the series are beginning to feel a bit stale. Every single car choice feels extremely similar if not absolutely identical in the way they handle, with each car's top speed and acceleration being the only variations.

It is rather sad that the internet issues and the other niggling issues with the game keep it from greatness. Need for Speed Rivals is an extremely fun racing game, and if you’re looking for an arcade style racer it’s still a whole lot of fun. Racing for the top of leaderboards is as fun as it ever has been, especially with the ability to race against people near you instead of just people that are on your friends list. Nonetheless, it’s hard to ignore the immense amount of wasted potential within the online features that Need for Speed Rivals promises, especially as this kind of always-on multiplayer becomes more common and more advanced.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-23

rocky8

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

As the latest installment in the long running Need for Speed series, Need for Speed Rivals simultaneously has a lot to live up to and a lot to prove. While the new studio developing the game, Ghost Games, might technically be a new studio they are made up of the people who worked for Criterion on Need for Speed games in the past, but that matters not, they still have to prove themselves as a worthy developer for the Need for Speed franchise.

To be sure, Ghost Games has really tried to make the series their own with Need for Speed rivals, implementing a number of new features that seem to change how the game is played completely, although the truth is a little far away from that. With Rivals, online play has become a core part of the entire game. Whenever you start up the game you are immediately forced to join a server with up to 5 other players, and put into an open world. The problem is that this world is absolutely massive, and six people cannot hope to even begin to make it feel populated.

Every once in a while you’ll zoom past another player going 200 miles per hour, but even those occurrences are rare and out of the ordinary. The fact that you’re on a server with other people never really matters until you are inevitably disconnected from it, meaning you lose all of your progress since the last time you visited a base. Honestly, after this happened a few times in quick succession, I chose to play offline instead of deal with the constant progress loss.

The game feels a whole lot like the Hot Pursuit reboot from a few years back when it comes to the actual racing. The events are split right down the middle by a distinction between racers and cops, a choice that you make right off the bat but can switch at any time.

Instead of Hot Pursuit’s strategy of using no narrative at all, Rivals weaves a strange and disturbing story about a racer who is basically an anarchist and a cop who sounds like he just wants to murder every single racer on the road. Both of these characters, which are only given silly racing names, are made to look like they are absolutely crazy, and sometimes I would often feel horrible about even playing as one of them. Neither of these characters is sympathetic in any way, and the story just feels utterly unnecessary for what still remains a very similar racing games to those in the past.

The actual driving mechanics, while virtually unchanged from past entries in the series are beginning to feel a bit stale. Every single car choice feels extremely similar if not absolutely identical in the way they handle, with each car's top speed and acceleration being the only variations.

It is rather sad that the internet issues and the other niggling issues with the game keep it from greatness. Need for Speed Rivals is an extremely fun racing game, and if you’re looking for an arcade style racer it’s still a whole lot of fun. Racing for the top of leaderboards is as fun as it ever has been, especially with the ability to race against people near you instead of just people that are on your friends list. Nonetheless, it’s hard to ignore the immense amount of wasted potential within the online features that Need for Speed Rivals promises, especially as this kind of always-on multiplayer becomes more common and more advanced.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-23

rocky8

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

As the latest installment in the long running Need for Speed series, Need for Speed Rivals simultaneously has a lot to live up to and a lot to prove. While the new studio developing the game, Ghost Games, might technically be a new studio they are made up of the people who worked for Criterion on Need for Speed games in the past, but that matters not, they still have to prove themselves as a worthy developer for the Need for Speed franchise.

To be sure, Ghost Games has really tried to make the series their own with Need for Speed rivals, implementing a number of new features that seem to change how the game is played completely, although the truth is a little far away from that. With Rivals, online play has become a core part of the entire game. Whenever you start up the game you are immediately forced to join a server with up to 5 other players, and put into an open world. The problem is that this world is absolutely massive, and six people cannot hope to even begin to make it feel populated.

Every once in a while you’ll zoom past another player going 200 miles per hour, but even those occurrences are rare and out of the ordinary. The fact that you’re on a server with other people never really matters until you are inevitably disconnected from it, meaning you lose all of your progress since the last time you visited a base. Honestly, after this happened a few times in quick succession, I chose to play offline instead of deal with the constant progress loss.

The game feels a whole lot like the Hot Pursuit reboot from a few years back when it comes to the actual racing. The events are split right down the middle by a distinction between racers and cops, a choice that you make right off the bat but can switch at any time.

Instead of Hot Pursuit’s strategy of using no narrative at all, Rivals weaves a strange and disturbing story about a racer who is basically an anarchist and a cop who sounds like he just wants to murder every single racer on the road. Both of these characters, which are only given silly racing names, are made to look like they are absolutely crazy, and sometimes I would often feel horrible about even playing as one of them. Neither of these characters is sympathetic in any way, and the story just feels utterly unnecessary for what still remains a very similar racing games to those in the past.

The actual driving mechanics, while virtually unchanged from past entries in the series are beginning to feel a bit stale. Every single car choice feels extremely similar if not absolutely identical in the way they handle, with each car's top speed and acceleration being the only variations.

It is rather sad that the internet issues and the other niggling issues with the game keep it from greatness. Need for Speed Rivals is an extremely fun racing game, and if you’re looking for an arcade style racer it’s still a whole lot of fun. Racing for the top of leaderboards is as fun as it ever has been, especially with the ability to race against people near you instead of just people that are on your friends list. Nonetheless, it’s hard to ignore the immense amount of wasted potential within the online features that Need for Speed Rivals promises, especially as this kind of always-on multiplayer becomes more common and more advanced.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-23

rocky8

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

As the latest installment in the long running Need for Speed series, Need for Speed Rivals simultaneously has a lot to live up to and a lot to prove. While the new studio developing the game, Ghost Games, might technically be a new studio they are made up of the people who worked for Criterion on Need for Speed games in the past, but that matters not, they still have to prove themselves as a worthy developer for the Need for Speed franchise.

To be sure, Ghost Games has really tried to make the series their own with Need for Speed rivals, implementing a number of new features that seem to change how the game is played completely, although the truth is a little far away from that. With Rivals, online play has become a core part of the entire game. Whenever you start up the game you are immediately forced to join a server with up to 5 other players, and put into an open world. The problem is that this world is absolutely massive, and six people cannot hope to even begin to make it feel populated.

Every once in a while you’ll zoom past another player going 200 miles per hour, but even those occurrences are rare and out of the ordinary. The fact that you’re on a server with other people never really matters until you are inevitably disconnected from it, meaning you lose all of your progress since the last time you visited a base. Honestly, after this happened a few times in quick succession, I chose to play offline instead of deal with the constant progress loss.

The game feels a whole lot like the Hot Pursuit reboot from a few years back when it comes to the actual racing. The events are split right down the middle by a distinction between racers and cops, a choice that you make right off the bat but can switch at any time.

Instead of Hot Pursuit’s strategy of using no narrative at all, Rivals weaves a strange and disturbing story about a racer who is basically an anarchist and a cop who sounds like he just wants to murder every single racer on the road. Both of these characters, which are only given silly racing names, are made to look like they are absolutely crazy, and sometimes I would often feel horrible about even playing as one of them. Neither of these characters is sympathetic in any way, and the story just feels utterly unnecessary for what still remains a very similar racing games to those in the past.

The actual driving mechanics, while virtually unchanged from past entries in the series are beginning to feel a bit stale. Every single car choice feels extremely similar if not absolutely identical in the way they handle, with each car's top speed and acceleration being the only variations.

It is rather sad that the internet issues and the other niggling issues with the game keep it from greatness. Need for Speed Rivals is an extremely fun racing game, and if you’re looking for an arcade style racer it’s still a whole lot of fun. Racing for the top of leaderboards is as fun as it ever has been, especially with the ability to race against people near you instead of just people that are on your friends list. Nonetheless, it’s hard to ignore the immense amount of wasted potential within the online features that Need for Speed Rivals promises, especially as this kind of always-on multiplayer becomes more common and more advanced.


  Viewing Reviews 1-10 of 12