User Reviews

6 Reviews


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Posted:
2013-06-11

2ndtribe

Newbie

8.5

The game takes place inside the context of the movie, but doesn’t have anything directly to do with the storyline. That gives it the capability to exist on its own merit, and doesn’t require that you have seen the movie to enjoy the game. If you haven’t, Bolt is a super-dog who can shoot lasers out of his eyes that you’ll be controlling for a lot of the game. The rest of the time, you’ll be in charge of Penny, Bolt’s owner. An evil scientist by the name of Dr. Calico is trying to get Penny’s dad to create a super-weapon, so it’s up to Bolt and Penny to stop him and save her dad.

The game is mostly made up of Bolt, traveling through levels trying to track down and catch Dr. Calico. To do this, he’ll have to tear through several thousands of enemies that are trying to stop him. The attacks he has available are either light or heavy, and can be built up into chains with multiple hits. Killing enemies gives him energy, which allows access to a group of special attacks.

When Bolt successfully attacks with a chain, it increases a combo counter that powers up a meter that allows Bolt to unleash Super attacks. These super attacks can be devastating to crowds to enemies. Just using the different skills available is fun, switching between ranged and melee, saving the energy earned for stronger enemies, and then building up the Super meter for a huge attack. The whole thing really comes together in the middle of the game, when waves of enemies hurl themselves at you unceasingly, and the different special attacks and Super attacks are required just to stay alive.

In order to prevent that action from ever getting to repetitive, the Penny levels slow everything down. In the levels which feature her, Penny generally has to sneak into a secret lair and hack a couple computers in order to help Bolt progress along. Her sequences have a lot more problem-solving and puzzle-solving aspects than Bolts, as well as quite a few platforming sections. She gets a mode called Vision that helps direct her to the next portion of the level, and there is a little mini-game that she has to play every time she hacks a computer. All these slow, focused exercises give a chance to rest the fingers and hands between the marathon battles that Bolt has to fight through.

A lot of games that have direct links to a movie end up trying to capitalize on the movie’s success for a quick buck, and therefore the games suffer. Bolt, on the other hand, does the opposite, and might even help gamers who had no desire to see the movie before, want to see the movie.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-05-08

2ndtribe

Newbie

8.5

The game takes place inside the context of the movie, but doesn't have anything directly to do with the storyline. That gives it the capability to exist on its own merit, and doesn't require that you have seen the movie to enjoy the game. If you haven't, Bolt is a super-dog who can shoot lasers out of his eyes that you'll be controlling for a lot of the game. The rest of the time, you'll be in charge of Penny, Bolt's owner. An evil scientist by the name of Dr. Calico is trying to get Penny's dad to create a super-weapon, so it's up to Bolt and Penny to stop him and save her dad.

The game is mostly made up of Bolt, traveling through levels trying to track down and catch Dr. Calico. To do this, he'll have to tear through several thousands of enemies that are trying to stop him. The attacks he has available are either light or heavy, and can be built up into chains with multiple hits. Killing enemies gives him energy, which allows access to a group of special attacks.

When Bolt successfully attacks with a chain, it increases a combo counter that powers up a meter that allows Bolt to unleash Super attacks. These super attacks can be devastating to crowds to enemies. Just using the different skills available is fun, switching between ranged and melee, saving the energy earned for stronger enemies, and then building up the Super meter for a huge attack. The whole thing really comes together in the middle of the game, when waves of enemies hurl themselves at you unceasingly, and the different special attacks and Super attacks are required just to stay alive.

In order to prevent that action from ever getting to repetitive, the Penny levels slow everything down. In the levels which feature her, Penny generally has to sneak into a secret lair and hack a couple computers in order to help Bolt progress along. Her sequences have a lot more problem-solving and puzzle-solving aspects than Bolts, as well as quite a few platforming sections. She gets a mode called Vision that helps direct her to the next portion of the level, and there is a little mini-game that she has to play every time she hacks a computer. All these slow, focused exercises give a chance to rest the fingers and hands between the marathon battles that Bolt has to fight through.

A lot of games that have direct links to a movie end up trying to capitalize on the movie's success for a quick buck, and therefore the games suffer. Bolt, on the other hand, does the opposite, and might even help gamers who had no desire to see the movie before, want to see the movie.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-05-08

2ndtribe

Newbie

8.5

The game takes place inside the context of the movie, but doesn't have anything directly to do with the storyline. That gives it the capability to exist on its own merit, and doesn't require that you have seen the movie to enjoy the game. If you haven't, Bolt is a super-dog who can shoot lasers out of his eyes that you'll be controlling for a lot of the game. The rest of the time, you'll be in charge of Penny, Bolt's owner. An evil scientist by the name of Dr. Calico is trying to get Penny's dad to create a super-weapon, so it's up to Bolt and Penny to stop him and save her dad.

The game is mostly made up of Bolt, traveling through levels trying to track down and catch Dr. Calico. To do this, he'll have to tear through several thousands of enemies that are trying to stop him. The attacks he has available are either light or heavy, and can be built up into chains with multiple hits. Killing enemies gives him energy, which allows access to a group of special attacks.

When Bolt successfully attacks with a chain, it increases a combo counter that powers up a meter that allows Bolt to unleash Super attacks. These super attacks can be devastating to crowds to enemies. Just using the different skills available is fun, switching between ranged and melee, saving the energy earned for stronger enemies, and then building up the Super meter for a huge attack. The whole thing really comes together in the middle of the game, when waves of enemies hurl themselves at you unceasingly, and the different special attacks and Super attacks are required just to stay alive.

In order to prevent that action from ever getting to repetitive, the Penny levels slow everything down. In the levels which feature her, Penny generally has to sneak into a secret lair and hack a couple computers in order to help Bolt progress along. Her sequences have a lot more problem-solving and puzzle-solving aspects than Bolts, as well as quite a few platforming sections. She gets a mode called Vision that helps direct her to the next portion of the level, and there is a little mini-game that she has to play every time she hacks a computer. All these slow, focused exercises give a chance to rest the fingers and hands between the marathon battles that Bolt has to fight through.

A lot of games that have direct links to a movie end up trying to capitalize on the movie's success for a quick buck, and therefore the games suffer. Bolt, on the other hand, does the opposite, and might even help gamers who had no desire to see the movie before, want to see the movie.

avatar name

Posted:
2012-10-12

2ndtribe

Newbie

8.5

The game takes place inside the context of the movie, but doesn't have anything directly to do with the storyline. That gives it the capability to exist on its own merit, and doesn't require that you have seen the movie to enjoy the game. If you haven't, Bolt is a super-dog who can shoot lasers out of his eyes that you'll be controlling for a lot of the game. The rest of the time, you'll be in charge of Penny, Bolt's owner. An evil scientist by the name of Dr. Calico is trying to get Penny's dad to create a super-weapon, so it's up to Bolt and Penny to stop him and save her dad.

The game is mostly made up of Bolt, traveling through levels trying to track down and catch Dr. Calico. To do this, he'll have to tear through several thousands of enemies that are trying to stop him. The attacks he has available are either light or heavy, and can be built up into chains with multiple hits. Killing enemies gives him energy, which allows access to a group of special attacks.

When Bolt successfully attacks with a chain, it increases a combo counter that powers up a meter that allows Bolt to unleash Super attacks. These super attacks can be devastating to crowds to enemies. Just using the different skills available is fun, switching between ranged and melee, saving the energy earned for stronger enemies, and then building up the Super meter for a huge attack. The whole thing really comes together in the middle of the game, when waves of enemies hurl themselves at you unceasingly, and the different special attacks and Super attacks are required just to stay alive.

In order to prevent that action from ever getting to repetitive, the Penny levels slow everything down. In the levels which feature her, Penny generally has to sneak into a secret lair and hack a couple computers in order to help Bolt progress along. Her sequences have a lot more problem-solving and puzzle-solving aspects than Bolts, as well as quite a few platforming sections. She gets a mode called Vision that helps direct her to the next portion of the level, and there is a little mini-game that she has to play every time she hacks a computer. All these slow, focused exercises give a chance to rest the fingers and hands between the marathon battles that Bolt has to fight through.

A lot of games that have direct links to a movie end up trying to capitalize on the movie's success for a quick buck, and therefore the games suffer. Bolt, on the other hand, does the opposite, and might even help gamers who had no desire to see the movie before, want to see the movie.

avatar name

Posted:
2012-10-13

2ndtribe

Newbie

8.5

The game has a ton of different modes for players to get into. The three main modes for players are the Franchise, Road to the Show, and the online multiplayer, but there is also a Home Run Derby mode, and Rivalry and Manager modes, too.

Franchise mode allows control of all thirty teams, if you happen to have about thirty people that want to play. This game mode gives players the opportunity to play as an owner or GM for a team, which means that things like ticket prices and fan promotions are able to be set to whatever spot you think will be best for your team.

In Road to the Show, you select a player and start them off on a Double-A team. Your objective is to work all the way up to playing in the majors. There is something of an RPG aspect to this mode, since between games you can modify your stats with drills, and the way you play in games modifies those statistics, too. That means if you miss a shot to first, your stats will drop to reflect that.

The online gaming in this version is similar to last year’s outing, except that now you can play on a Season League. That allows for a full online season that saves statistics between games. The online experience is solid and lag free, and will give you the opportunity to try out all those skills you’ve mastered playing single-player seasons.

The graphics in MLB 10 are, of course, gorgeous. The enormous number of little things that players do on the field lends a lot to the realism of the game. Just watching your characters adjust their batting helmets as they go back to a base, or seeing your catcher throw his mask down in disgust is enough to have a player feel fully immersed in the game. The sound is done well, too, and players can even record their own crowd chants and taunts to spice up the game.

If there is one dark spot on the game itself that needs to be improved for next year, it would be the AI in the different single-player modes. Sometimes, it makes decisions that a baseball fan will realize would not ever really happen in a season. Sadly, things like that can throw a monkey wrench into the believability of a game, but at least the mistakes are few and far between.

For fans of baseball, MLB 10: The Show has everything you could ever want. Even though the occasional gaff is made by the AI, generally this game has enough to keep gamers coming back again and again.

avatar name

Posted:
2012-10-13

2ndtribe

Newbie

6.5

This game is a sequel to a game on the PS2, Genji: Dawn of the Samurai, and it continues where the story of that first game left off. The hero of the tale is Yoshitsune, a young swordsman who must defend the Genji clan against all enemies. The primary enemy that must be fought is the Heishi, the enemy clan from the previous game, who have transformed into demonic fighters with pink crystals jutting out of their bodies. Your character will team up with three others who will adventure with you through the game.

The game is played much like other hack-and-slash style of games, with the face buttons performing attacks and allowing you to jump. The right-side shoulder buttons can be held down in combat to allow your character to lock on and dodge. The right analog is the one difference from other styles of games, in that it allows you to perform rolls, dodges, and flips to evade attacks and attackers. Pushing the D-pad in any direction will switch in and out players. You are only allowed to have one of your four characters fighting at any given time, but you can freely switch between them for the character that is right for any given situation.

It’s actually the case that you will find yourself switching between characters a bunch, too. That’s because each individual character has their own life bar, and if the character that you are using runs out of life, your adventure is over. So, you will switch your characters up to keep them alive and utilize the best one in any given situation.

The characters in this game receive upgrades as they go on, too, to both their weapons and their skills. Acquiring a new weapon for any character as you go through the game opens up entirely new combat skills, and will show your character performing new attacks when they’re equipped. This is not something you’ll find yourself doing a bunch, however, as new weapons don’t increase your damage or need to be used to fight against certain types of enemies. It’s an intriguing new system that is not used to its best advantage in this game.

One thing that is shown to best advantage is the graphics. The character models, enemy models, and world are all breathtaking, and some of the graphical features in the levels will have you slack-jawed. Regardless, there are only a few different enemy character models to fight, and the levels have a traditional level layout and feel, even if they do look nice.

If you’re looking for the very prettiest hack-and-slash adventure game out there, then you’ve found it with Genji: Days of the Blade. Just don’t expect a whole lot of game mechanics to back that up.