User Review

21 Reviews


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Posted:
2014-03-25

monty

Super Gamer Dude

Xbox 360

6.5

Many 3D platformers have been produced for the handheld consoles but there has been a definite lack of these, especially for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, or at least good ones. In the past, the PlayStation systems have had banner franchises like Jak and Daxter or Ratchet and Clank, but those franchises have fallen by the wayside, meaning that anyone who does not own a Nintendo system is often hard pressed to find a 3D platformer to play.

Microsoft in particular has tried to fill this gap in their lineup multiple times, failing more spectacularly every single time. Back in the PS2/Xbox era there was one platformer that came out both places and was actually pretty decent, Pac-Man World. These games were okay, but never really stood out that much.

Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures carries this torch under a different name. Everything about Ghostly Adventures has the makings of a perfectly serviceable 3D platformer, but when you start trying to piece all of the parts together they never quite click together in the way that you would expect them to.

For starters, the developers of Ghostly Adventures decided that they needed to create a story to try and explain why Pac-Man is in a 3D platformer. As might be expected, the story it absolutely terrible, it takes place on a planet named Pac-World and the main villain is named Betrayus. Pac-Man is voiced to sound like a 10 year old child and everyone else surrounding him sounds like they are at about the same age. The voice acting is awful, the story is awful, the character design is awful, everything about the game's aesthetics is just about as bad as it can get.

Even the environments that the levels take place in are about as generic as you could possibly get. Every different type of level feels like it was pulled directly from a 3D platformer checklist. There is a city world, an ice world and a jungle world among others, each with almost the exact same platforming gameplay design in a different set of window dressing.

Sure, aesthetics might make up the vast majority of what makes a 3D platformer stand out from the other ones on the market, but sometimes gameplay can help one of these titles distinguish itself as well. Sadly, Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures is not one of those titles. The game is extremely generic in the way it plays, but it does not bear much resemblance to modern 3D platformers.

Instead, Ghostly Adventures seems to deliberately choose to imitate 3D platformers of yore - perhaps the ones that originated the genre. The camera is clunky and unwieldy in a way that I have not seen since the original Spyro games, and the platforming itself does not fare much better.

Sure, Pac-Man Ghostly Adventures is a completely passable game in just about every single way, but that does not excuse it from criticism. Pac-Man was once a franchise that was always making excellent titles, and it seemed like games such as Pac-Man CE DX were going to be a return to those times.

Ghostly Adventures shows that Namco still expects to be able to wring money from a franchise that is losing more and more cache over the years by simply making a bad version of a modern Sonic platformer and slapping Pac-Man in it. This game does nothing to improve the 3D platformer on non-Nintendo platforms, and I honestly can't see a future in which any Pac-Man game does that. If you have kids that are really into Pac-Man, this isn't terrible, but everyone else should stay away.

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Posted:
2014-02-22

monty

Super Gamer Dude

Xbox 360

8.4

Rockstar games is at it again and has developed an open world third person shooting game similar to the Grand Theft Auto Franchise. L.A. Noire for the Xbox 360 comes to you taking place in the year 1947 in Los Angeles California. You are in the middle of many incidents going on all throughout the city as a police detective for the Los Angeles Police Department. Since this game takes place in the late 1940s you are going to have to expect to be involved in a lot of gangster cases.

The team that actually developed L.A. Noire is Team Bondi and the game was published by Rockstar Games. For those gamers that appreciate unique gameplay and a mind blogging play the whole way through will find much interest here. Do not expect to run and gun your way through this game. L.A. Noire aims at taking gamers in a different direction. L.A. Noire is focused more on your detective skills and ability to assess situations that unfold in front of you rather than a full on assault.

One feature this game has that a lot of people enjoyed was the interrogations conducted throughout the game. As a detective you have to ask people questions, and based on their response you form an opinion on if you think they are telling the truth or not. This adds an interesting element to the game because you have to decipher how to read someone based on the situation that has unfolded, their tone of voice and their overall facial expressions while you ask them questions. This element L.A. Noire makes it very fun for those gamers who like to try and decipher questions and mysteries. Yet for those who simply like to run around and shoot things this is not your type of game.

Overall L.A. Noire is a moderately fun game. Because of the slow paced feel gamers can find themselves getting a little agitated and ready for action at times. Not that there is not a lack of action in the game, but for those who are looking for a Grand Theft Auto type of feel to the game look elsewhere. This game is fun for the gamers who do not mind spending a little extra time and effort to figure out clues provided throughout the game. The story is one of the most interesting aspects of the game and it feels as if you were in a movie when you are playing.

Anyone who wants to try a completely unique game should give L.A. Noire a try. The Xbox 360 offers high quality graphics and sound while you are playing through the game. Remember that there is downloadable content expected to be periodically be released in the coming future for the game so it does have some replay value. L.A. Noire is a fun and interesting experience.

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Posted:
2014-03-26

monty

Super Gamer Dude

3DS

6.5

Many 3D platformers have been produced for the handheld consoles but there has been a definite lack of these, especially for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, or at least good ones. In the past, the PlayStation systems have had banner franchises like Jak and Daxter or Ratchet and Clank, but those franchises have fallen by the wayside, meaning that anyone who does not own a Nintendo system is often hard pressed to find a 3D platformer to play.

Microsoft in particular has tried to fill this gap in their lineup multiple times, failing more spectacularly every single time. Back in the PS2/Xbox era there was one platformer that came out both places and was actually pretty decent, Pac-Man World. These games were okay, but never really stood out that much.

Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures carries this torch under a different name. Everything about Ghostly Adventures has the makings of a perfectly serviceable 3D platformer, but when you start trying to piece all of the parts together they never quite click together in the way that you would expect them to.

For starters, the developers of Ghostly Adventures decided that they needed to create a story to try and explain why Pac-Man is in a 3D platformer. As might be expected, the story it absolutely terrible, it takes place on a planet named Pac-World and the main villain is named Betrayus. Pac-Man is voiced to sound like a 10 year old child and everyone else surrounding him sounds like they are at about the same age. The voice acting is awful, the story is awful, the character design is awful, everything about the game's aesthetics is just about as bad as it can get.

Even the environments that the levels take place in are about as generic as you could possibly get. Every different type of level feels like it was pulled directly from a 3D platformer checklist. There is a city world, an ice world and a jungle world among others, each with almost the exact same platforming gameplay design in a different set of window dressing.

Sure, aesthetics might make up the vast majority of what makes a 3D platformer stand out from the other ones on the market, but sometimes gameplay can help one of these titles distinguish itself as well. Sadly, Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures is not one of those titles. The game is extremely generic in the way it plays, but it does not bear much resemblance to modern 3D platformers.

Instead, Ghostly Adventures seems to deliberately choose to imitate 3D platformers of yore - perhaps the ones that originated the genre. The camera is clunky and unwieldy in a way that I have not seen since the original Spyro games, and the platforming itself does not fare much better.

Sure, Pac-Man Ghostly Adventures is a completely passable game in just about every single way, but that does not excuse it from criticism. Pac-Man was once a franchise that was always making excellent titles, and it seemed like games such as Pac-Man CE DX were going to be a return to those times.

Ghostly Adventures shows that Namco still expects to be able to wring money from a franchise that is losing more and more cache over the years by simply making a bad version of a modern Sonic platformer and slapping Pac-Man in it. This game does nothing to improve the 3D platformer on non-Nintendo platforms, and I honestly can't see a future in which any Pac-Man game does that. If you have kids that are really into Pac-Man, this isn't terrible, but everyone else should stay away.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-26

monty

Super Gamer Dude

Wii U

6.5

Many 3D platformers have been produced for the handheld consoles but there has been a definite lack of these, especially for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, or at least good ones. In the past, the PlayStation systems have had banner franchises like Jak and Daxter or Ratchet and Clank, but those franchises have fallen by the wayside, meaning that anyone who does not own a Nintendo system is often hard pressed to find a 3D platformer to play.

Microsoft in particular has tried to fill this gap in their lineup multiple times, failing more spectacularly every single time. Back in the PS2/Xbox era there was one platformer that came out both places and was actually pretty decent, Pac-Man World. These games were okay, but never really stood out that much.

Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures carries this torch under a different name. Everything about Ghostly Adventures has the makings of a perfectly serviceable 3D platformer, but when you start trying to piece all of the parts together they never quite click together in the way that you would expect them to.

For starters, the developers of Ghostly Adventures decided that they needed to create a story to try and explain why Pac-Man is in a 3D platformer. As might be expected, the story it absolutely terrible, it takes place on a planet named Pac-World and the main villain is named Betrayus. Pac-Man is voiced to sound like a 10 year old child and everyone else surrounding him sounds like they are at about the same age. The voice acting is awful, the story is awful, the character design is awful, everything about the game's aesthetics is just about as bad as it can get.

Even the environments that the levels take place in are about as generic as you could possibly get. Every different type of level feels like it was pulled directly from a 3D platformer checklist. There is a city world, an ice world and a jungle world among others, each with almost the exact same platforming gameplay design in a different set of window dressing.

Sure, aesthetics might make up the vast majority of what makes a 3D platformer stand out from the other ones on the market, but sometimes gameplay can help one of these titles distinguish itself as well. Sadly, Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures is not one of those titles. The game is extremely generic in the way it plays, but it does not bear much resemblance to modern 3D platformers.

Instead, Ghostly Adventures seems to deliberately choose to imitate 3D platformers of yore - perhaps the ones that originated the genre. The camera is clunky and unwieldy in a way that I have not seen since the original Spyro games, and the platforming itself does not fare much better.

Sure, Pac-Man Ghostly Adventures is a completely passable game in just about every single way, but that does not excuse it from criticism. Pac-Man was once a franchise that was always making excellent titles, and it seemed like games such as Pac-Man CE DX were going to be a return to those times.

Ghostly Adventures shows that Namco still expects to be able to wring money from a franchise that is losing more and more cache over the years by simply making a bad version of a modern Sonic platformer and slapping Pac-Man in it. This game does nothing to improve the 3D platformer on non-Nintendo platforms, and I honestly can't see a future in which any Pac-Man game does that. If you have kids that are really into Pac-Man, this isn't terrible, but everyone else should stay away.

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Posted:
2014-01-15

monty

Super Gamer Dude

Nintendo Wii

7.0

Toy Story 3 for the Wii makes good use of the game's license in re-creating an authentic Toy Story 3 gameplay experience. Toy Story 3 is able to create it's own gameplay story while still maintaining relevant story information. Other options integrated into the game along with various game modes make Toy Story 3 a game that sticks true to the series.

In Toy Story 3 players enter the Toy Box story mode in which people are able to choose from either Woody, Buzz Lightyear or even the cowgirl Jessie. The basic synopsis of the game's story is that the main characters of the game interact with their environment in the way the toy or the player would naturally.

This means that the person may spend time updating their town, building extension buildings, paint their town buildings different colors, add a variety of building textures and even add toy landscape features like trees, grass, boulders and more. Players may also enlarge or shrink buildings as they see fit when constructing their town so that they may create their own perfect toy town setting.

While the player is going about their own story, they'll also be challenged with game missions from time to time. When finishing the mission, the person is awarded with different prizes which might be new options for customizing game elements or even gold. There will be times when new story lines within the game branch up and it's up to the player to decide which path they would like to play next. Some moments in the game may have the player racing a toy car around a race course or other times the person might be in the middle of a mission quest that can involve different locations or characters.

Besides updating the town and surrounding areas, people can also purchase new toys from the Toy Catalog. There can be many different types of new toy characters or items that can be bought and integrated into the players "story". There are many other hidden options in the game that will leave the player entertained. Some of the hidden options tie into the main Toy Story 3 scenario such as Sid's Haunted House.

In the game, people can add what are called Deluxe Playsets into the Toy Box story mode. The Deluxe Playsets are collections of toys, buildings and items that go together to create a theme in the story. The Sid's Haunted House is a toy haunted house created by the Sid character from the movie. The Sid's Haunted House integrates new characters, toys and customization settings the player may change.

A fun feature of the game involves giving the player's a hands-on approach when being subjected to a tutorial rather than simply being told what to do or how to perform something. Lastly, Toy Story 3 for Wii gives players a reason to keep coming back to play the game. The free roaming ability with the option to create the player's own story and also encounter a unique Toy Story 3 scenario help to make a truly authentic experience.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-25

monty

Super Gamer Dude

PlayStation 3

6.5

Many 3D platformers have been produced for the handheld consoles but there has been a definite lack of these, especially for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, or at least good ones. In the past, the PlayStation systems have had banner franchises like Jak and Daxter or Ratchet and Clank, but those franchises have fallen by the wayside, meaning that anyone who does not own a Nintendo system is often hard pressed to find a 3D platformer to play.

Microsoft in particular has tried to fill this gap in their lineup multiple times, failing more spectacularly every single time. Back in the PS2/Xbox era there was one platformer that came out both places and was actually pretty decent, Pac-Man World. These games were okay, but never really stood out that much.

Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures carries this torch under a different name. Everything about Ghostly Adventures has the makings of a perfectly serviceable 3D platformer, but when you start trying to piece all of the parts together they never quite click together in the way that you would expect them to.

For starters, the developers of Ghostly Adventures decided that they needed to create a story to try and explain why Pac-Man is in a 3D platformer. As might be expected, the story it absolutely terrible, it takes place on a planet named Pac-World and the main villain is named Betrayus. Pac-Man is voiced to sound like a 10 year old child and everyone else surrounding him sounds like they are at about the same age. The voice acting is awful, the story is awful, the character design is awful, everything about the game's aesthetics is just about as bad as it can get.

Even the environments that the levels take place in are about as generic as you could possibly get. Every different type of level feels like it was pulled directly from a 3D platformer checklist. There is a city world, an ice world and a jungle world among others, each with almost the exact same platforming gameplay design in a different set of window dressing.

Sure, aesthetics might make up the vast majority of what makes a 3D platformer stand out from the other ones on the market, but sometimes gameplay can help one of these titles distinguish itself as well. Sadly, Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures is not one of those titles. The game is extremely generic in the way it plays, but it does not bear much resemblance to modern 3D platformers.

Instead, Ghostly Adventures seems to deliberately choose to imitate 3D platformers of yore - perhaps the ones that originated the genre. The camera is clunky and unwieldy in a way that I have not seen since the original Spyro games, and the platforming itself does not fare much better.

Sure, Pac-Man Ghostly Adventures is a completely passable game in just about every single way, but that does not excuse it from criticism. Pac-Man was once a franchise that was always making excellent titles, and it seemed like games such as Pac-Man CE DX were going to be a return to those times.

Ghostly Adventures shows that Namco still expects to be able to wring money from a franchise that is losing more and more cache over the years by simply making a bad version of a modern Sonic platformer and slapping Pac-Man in it. This game does nothing to improve the 3D platformer on non-Nintendo platforms, and I honestly can't see a future in which any Pac-Man game does that. If you have kids that are really into Pac-Man, this isn't terrible, but everyone else should stay away.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-22

monty

Super Gamer Dude

Xbox One

6.0

As a genre, it has always seemed like stealth came and went as it pleased, much as the characters within these games often do to elude detection. Right now, we seem to be in a rather good phase for the stealth game in general. Between the introduction of new mechanics in independent games like Mark of the Ninja, the creation of exciting new franchises like Dishonored, or the return of storied franchises of yore like Metal Gear Solid or Splinter Cell, there is a lot for Stealth gamers to love. Sadly, the latest version of one of the older stealth franchises there is, Thief, is not one of these games.

The Thief games have been going for almost a full decade, and in the early days of preview coverage, it looked like Thief was going to be able to implement new mechanics from games such as Dishonored while still maintaining the feeling of a Thief game. Sadly, it seems like the constant rumors of serious development problems were well-founded, and there are countless issues that plague what is a game that maintains an interesting concept at its core.

Drawing a comparison between this game and the still somewhat recent Dishonored is almost a bit eerie. Both games involve rather similar plots involving a plague and some sort of dark voodoo magic behind everything, and Thief borrows quite a few ideas from Dishonored, including the existence of several small hub worlds within which are story missions as well as a selection of different side missions that the main character Garrett can choose to undertake or not.

The problem with Thief trying to use these mechanics is that it uses the same high roofs and narrow walkways without considering the fact that it is lacking the one thing that made traversing DishonoredÂ’s world fun, the magical powers. Sure, at the core of ThiefÂ’s story lies some magical conspiracy that even after finishing the game remains a bit murky to me, but none of that really manifests itself within the gameplay, leaving you to clumsily search for ways to get up on roofs using context sensitive button presses.

Those button prompts are just the beginning of how Thief seems to constrain you, though. Whereas the older Thief games, particularly the first one, created a sort of open world even within the enclosed spaces of homes and sewer tunnels, every time the player enters a mission in this new Thief, they make a transition from a semi-open hub world to a painfully linear set of hallways and rooms. There is some freedom to how you deal with enemies, but the easy way out is always just to sneak up behind them and knock them out, which isnÂ’t hard thanks to the awful enemy AI.

Even stealing things in this new Thief feels wrong. Every time you would steal something in the older Thief games, it felt like a big score, like you were really achieving something. Here, Garrett is stealing literally everything that he can get his hands on from single gold coins to handheld mirrors. Instead of feeling like a master thief, Garrett instead feels like an insane kleptomaniac roaming through the city looking to steal garbage.

Even though the franchise is older than that of Dishonored, everything about this new Thief game feels like it was cribbed from Dishonored and then immediately made worse. Thief feels like what a cheaply produced knock-off version of Dishonored might feel like, and that is its biggest problem. If you like any number of the ideas that Thief puts forward, try out Dishonored.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-22

monty

Super Gamer Dude

Xbox 360

6.0

As a genre, it has always seemed like stealth came and went as it pleased, much as the characters within these games often do to elude detection. Right now, we seem to be in a rather good phase for the stealth game in general. Between the introduction of new mechanics in independent games like Mark of the Ninja, the creation of exciting new franchises like Dishonored, or the return of storied franchises of yore like Metal Gear Solid or Splinter Cell, there is a lot for Stealth gamers to love. Sadly, the latest version of one of the older stealth franchises there is, Thief, is not one of these games.

The Thief games have been going for almost a full decade, and in the early days of preview coverage, it looked like Thief was going to be able to implement new mechanics from games such as Dishonored while still maintaining the feeling of a Thief game. Sadly, it seems like the constant rumors of serious development problems were well-founded, and there are countless issues that plague what is a game that maintains an interesting concept at its core.

Drawing a comparison between this game and the still somewhat recent Dishonored is almost a bit eerie. Both games involve rather similar plots involving a plague and some sort of dark voodoo magic behind everything, and Thief borrows quite a few ideas from Dishonored, including the existence of several small hub worlds within which are story missions as well as a selection of different side missions that the main character Garrett can choose to undertake or not.

The problem with Thief trying to use these mechanics is that it uses the same high roofs and narrow walkways without considering the fact that it is lacking the one thing that made traversing DishonoredÂ’s world fun, the magical powers. Sure, at the core of ThiefÂ’s story lies some magical conspiracy that even after finishing the game remains a bit murky to me, but none of that really manifests itself within the gameplay, leaving you to clumsily search for ways to get up on roofs using context sensitive button presses.

Those button prompts are just the beginning of how Thief seems to constrain you, though. Whereas the older Thief games, particularly the first one, created a sort of open world even within the enclosed spaces of homes and sewer tunnels, every time the player enters a mission in this new Thief, they make a transition from a semi-open hub world to a painfully linear set of hallways and rooms. There is some freedom to how you deal with enemies, but the easy way out is always just to sneak up behind them and knock them out, which isnÂ’t hard thanks to the awful enemy AI.

Even stealing things in this new Thief feels wrong. Every time you would steal something in the older Thief games, it felt like a big score, like you were really achieving something. Here, Garrett is stealing literally everything that he can get his hands on from single gold coins to handheld mirrors. Instead of feeling like a master thief, Garrett instead feels like an insane kleptomaniac roaming through the city looking to steal garbage.

Even though the franchise is older than that of Dishonored, everything about this new Thief game feels like it was cribbed from Dishonored and then immediately made worse. Thief feels like what a cheaply produced knock-off version of Dishonored might feel like, and that is its biggest problem. If you like any number of the ideas that Thief puts forward, try out Dishonored.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-22

monty

Super Gamer Dude

PlayStation 3

6.0

As a genre, it has always seemed like stealth came and went as it pleased, much as the characters within these games often do to elude detection. Right now, we seem to be in a rather good phase for the stealth game in general. Between the introduction of new mechanics in independent games like Mark of the Ninja, the creation of exciting new franchises like Dishonored, or the return of storied franchises of yore like Metal Gear Solid or Splinter Cell, there is a lot for Stealth gamers to love. Sadly, the latest version of one of the older stealth franchises there is, Thief, is not one of these games.

The Thief games have been going for almost a full decade, and in the early days of preview coverage, it looked like Thief was going to be able to implement new mechanics from games such as Dishonored while still maintaining the feeling of a Thief game. Sadly, it seems like the constant rumors of serious development problems were well-founded, and there are countless issues that plague what is a game that maintains an interesting concept at its core.

Drawing a comparison between this game and the still somewhat recent Dishonored is almost a bit eerie. Both games involve rather similar plots involving a plague and some sort of dark voodoo magic behind everything, and Thief borrows quite a few ideas from Dishonored, including the existence of several small hub worlds within which are story missions as well as a selection of different side missions that the main character Garrett can choose to undertake or not.

The problem with Thief trying to use these mechanics is that it uses the same high roofs and narrow walkways without considering the fact that it is lacking the one thing that made traversing DishonoredÂ’s world fun, the magical powers. Sure, at the core of ThiefÂ’s story lies some magical conspiracy that even after finishing the game remains a bit murky to me, but none of that really manifests itself within the gameplay, leaving you to clumsily search for ways to get up on roofs using context sensitive button presses.

Those button prompts are just the beginning of how Thief seems to constrain you, though. Whereas the older Thief games, particularly the first one, created a sort of open world even within the enclosed spaces of homes and sewer tunnels, every time the player enters a mission in this new Thief, they make a transition from a semi-open hub world to a painfully linear set of hallways and rooms. There is some freedom to how you deal with enemies, but the easy way out is always just to sneak up behind them and knock them out, which isnÂ’t hard thanks to the awful enemy AI.

Even stealing things in this new Thief feels wrong. Every time you would steal something in the older Thief games, it felt like a big score, like you were really achieving something. Here, Garrett is stealing literally everything that he can get his hands on from single gold coins to handheld mirrors. Instead of feeling like a master thief, Garrett instead feels like an insane kleptomaniac roaming through the city looking to steal garbage.

Even though the franchise is older than that of Dishonored, everything about this new Thief game feels like it was cribbed from Dishonored and then immediately made worse. Thief feels like what a cheaply produced knock-off version of Dishonored might feel like, and that is its biggest problem. If you like any number of the ideas that Thief puts forward, try out Dishonored.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-22

monty

Super Gamer Dude

PS4

6.0

Thief on the PlayStation 4 (also known as Thief 4) is a stealth video game developed by video game developers Eidos Montreal, and published by Square Enix.

As a genre, it has always seemed like stealth came and went as it pleased, much as the characters within these games often do to elude detection. Right now, we seem to be in a rather good phase for the stealth game in general. Between the introduction of new mechanics in independent games like Mark of the Ninja, the creation of exciting new franchises like Dishonored, or the return of storied franchises of yore like Metal Gear Solid or Splinter Cell, there is a lot for Stealth gamers to love. Sadly, the latest version of one of the older stealth franchises there is, Thief, is not one of these games.

The Thief games have been going for almost a full decade, and in the early days of preview coverage, it looked like Thief was going to be able to implement new mechanics from games such as Dishonored while still maintaining the feeling of a Thief game. Sadly, it seems like the constant rumors of serious development problems were well-founded, and there are countless issues that plague what is a game that maintains an interesting concept at its core.

Drawing a comparison between this game and the still somewhat recent Dishonored is almost a bit eerie. Both games involve rather similar plots involving a plague and some sort of dark voodoo magic behind everything, and Thief borrows quite a few ideas from Dishonored, including the existence of several small hub worlds within which are story missions as well as a selection of different side missions that the main character Garrett can choose to undertake or not.

The problem with Thief trying to use these mechanics is that it uses the same high roofs and narrow walkways without considering the fact that it is lacking the one thing that made traversing Dishonored's world fun, the magical powers. Sure, at the core of Thief's story lies some magical conspiracy that even after finishing the game remains a bit murky to me, but none of that really manifests itself within the gameplay, leaving you to clumsily search for ways to get up on roofs using context sensitive button presses.

Those button prompts are just the beginning of how Thief seems to constrain you, though. Whereas the older Thief games, particularly the first one, created a sort of open world even within the enclosed spaces of homes and sewer tunnels, every time the player enters a mission in this new Thief, they make a transition from a semi-open hub world to a painfully linear set of hallways and rooms. There is some freedom to how you deal with enemies, but the easy way out is always just to sneak up behind them and knock them out, which isn't hard thanks to the awful enemy AI.

Even stealing things in this new Thief feels wrong. Every time you would steal something in the older Thief games, it felt like a big score, like you were really achieving something. Here, Garrett is stealing literally everything that he can get his hands on from single gold coins to handheld mirrors. Instead of feeling like a master thief, Garrett instead feels like an insane kleptomaniac roaming through the city looking to steal garbage.

Even though the franchise is older than that of Dishonored, everything about this new Thief game on the PlayStation 4 feels like it was cribbed from Dishonored and then immediately made worse. Thief feels like what a cheaply produced knock-off version of Dishonored might feel like, and that is its biggest problem. If you like any number of the ideas that Thief puts forward, try out Dishonored.


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