User Review

21 Reviews


  Viewing Reviews 1-10 of 21
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Posted:
2013-05-22

monty

Super Gamer Dude

7.1

The Adventures of Tintin is an action/adventure game released and developed by Ubisoft, and is based on the film of the same name. The game is mainly a platform title.

You get to play as Tintin, Snowy, and in the final battle, Captain Haddock. The game offers a third person view, and not a side scrolling perspective as most platformers do.

Playing as Tintin, a young reporter/journalist who will stop at nothing to get a break on a tasty story, despite the huge amounts of trouble it may cause him. One day he buys a model ship Unicorn on a whim, and shortly after you discover that there is a lot more to this ship than meets the eye, and it is your job to unravel the mystery, as well as to fend off multitudes of bad guys while doing so. Most of the action takes place in mansions, underground caverns, and the deep in bowels of ships.

Tintin's wide array of skills make all these tasks seem simple. Wall climbing, jumping, running, and getting over and around obstacles, are way too smooth and easy, and it never feels like there is an ounce of skill involved in doing so. Some of your movements are automated making it kid friendly, and a breeze for anyone with skills at gaming. This also applies to combat. Pressing one button lets you sail through most enemies without much difficulty, and when tough enemies do arise, you just sneak past them. The Adventures of Tintin tries to shake things up with a few puzzles, but these are also so simplistic! Some of the puzzles include searching for levers to open different pathways, or using weights to get the correct balance on seesaw machines.

In this game you get access to vehicles, but the parts you play with them are too easy as well. You get to pilot a plane through a storm, where you avoid tornadoes and attack other aircraft, but you can do each action with the push of just one button. They also give you a bike, but when you ride on it, it is also very easy to catch other bikes and hit them with your slingshot. And after a couple of hours of playing you will soon start to realize that everything feels familiar. Repetition is huge in this game, and lots of puzzles and vehicle scenes are constantly repeated, making the game very boring.

The Adventures of Tintin is just an average family game, and if you're a serious gamer looking for a challenge you should certainly skip this one. There are plenty of more challenging platform games out there to test your mettle.

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Posted:
2014-01-15

monty

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

Toy Story 3 for the Wii makes good use of the game's license in re-creating an authentic Toy Story 3 gameplay experience. Toy Story 3 is able to create it's own gameplay story while still maintaining relevant story information. Other options integrated into the game along with various game modes make Toy Story 3 a game that sticks true to the series.

In Toy Story 3 players enter the Toy Box story mode in which people are able to choose from either Woody, Buzz Lightyear or even the cowgirl Jessie. The basic synopsis of the game's story is that the main characters of the game interact with their environment in the way the toy or the player would naturally.

This means that the person may spend time updating their town, building extension buildings, paint their town buildings different colors, add a variety of building textures and even add toy landscape features like trees, grass, boulders and more. Players may also enlarge or shrink buildings as they see fit when constructing their town so that they may create their own perfect toy town setting.

While the player is going about their own story, they'll also be challenged with game missions from time to time. When finishing the mission, the person is awarded with different prizes which might be new options for customizing game elements or even gold. There will be times when new story lines within the game branch up and it's up to the player to decide which path they would like to play next. Some moments in the game may have the player racing a toy car around a race course or other times the person might be in the middle of a mission quest that can involve different locations or characters.

Besides updating the town and surrounding areas, people can also purchase new toys from the Toy Catalog. There can be many different types of new toy characters or items that can be bought and integrated into the players "story". There are many other hidden options in the game that will leave the player entertained. Some of the hidden options tie into the main Toy Story 3 scenario such as Sid's Haunted House.

In the game, people can add what are called Deluxe Playsets into the Toy Box story mode. The Deluxe Playsets are collections of toys, buildings and items that go together to create a theme in the story. The Sid's Haunted House is a toy haunted house created by the Sid character from the movie. The Sid's Haunted House integrates new characters, toys and customization settings the player may change.

A fun feature of the game involves giving the player's a hands-on approach when being subjected to a tutorial rather than simply being told what to do or how to perform something. Lastly, Toy Story 3 for Wii gives players a reason to keep coming back to play the game. The free roaming ability with the option to create the player's own story and also encounter a unique Toy Story 3 scenario help to make a truly authentic experience.

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Posted:
2014-03-26

monty

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Many 3D platformers have been produced for the handheld consoles but there has been a definite lack of these, especially for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, or at least good ones. In the past, the PlayStation systems have had banner franchises like Jak and Daxter or Ratchet and Clank, but those franchises have fallen by the wayside, meaning that anyone who does not own a Nintendo system is often hard pressed to find a 3D platformer to play.

Microsoft in particular has tried to fill this gap in their lineup multiple times, failing more spectacularly every single time. Back in the PS2/Xbox era there was one platformer that came out both places and was actually pretty decent, Pac-Man World. These games were okay, but never really stood out that much.

Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures carries this torch under a different name. Everything about Ghostly Adventures has the makings of a perfectly serviceable 3D platformer, but when you start trying to piece all of the parts together they never quite click together in the way that you would expect them to.

For starters, the developers of Ghostly Adventures decided that they needed to create a story to try and explain why Pac-Man is in a 3D platformer. As might be expected, the story it absolutely terrible, it takes place on a planet named Pac-World and the main villain is named Betrayus. Pac-Man is voiced to sound like a 10 year old child and everyone else surrounding him sounds like they are at about the same age. The voice acting is awful, the story is awful, the character design is awful, everything about the game's aesthetics is just about as bad as it can get.

Even the environments that the levels take place in are about as generic as you could possibly get. Every different type of level feels like it was pulled directly from a 3D platformer checklist. There is a city world, an ice world and a jungle world among others, each with almost the exact same platforming gameplay design in a different set of window dressing.

Sure, aesthetics might make up the vast majority of what makes a 3D platformer stand out from the other ones on the market, but sometimes gameplay can help one of these titles distinguish itself as well. Sadly, Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures is not one of those titles. The game is extremely generic in the way it plays, but it does not bear much resemblance to modern 3D platformers.

Instead, Ghostly Adventures seems to deliberately choose to imitate 3D platformers of yore - perhaps the ones that originated the genre. The camera is clunky and unwieldy in a way that I have not seen since the original Spyro games, and the platforming itself does not fare much better.

Sure, Pac-Man Ghostly Adventures is a completely passable game in just about every single way, but that does not excuse it from criticism. Pac-Man was once a franchise that was always making excellent titles, and it seemed like games such as Pac-Man CE DX were going to be a return to those times.

Ghostly Adventures shows that Namco still expects to be able to wring money from a franchise that is losing more and more cache over the years by simply making a bad version of a modern Sonic platformer and slapping Pac-Man in it. This game does nothing to improve the 3D platformer on non-Nintendo platforms, and I honestly can't see a future in which any Pac-Man game does that. If you have kids that are really into Pac-Man, this isn't terrible, but everyone else should stay away.

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Posted:
2014-03-26

monty

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Many 3D platformers have been produced for the handheld consoles but there has been a definite lack of these, especially for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, or at least good ones. In the past, the PlayStation systems have had banner franchises like Jak and Daxter or Ratchet and Clank, but those franchises have fallen by the wayside, meaning that anyone who does not own a Nintendo system is often hard pressed to find a 3D platformer to play.

Microsoft in particular has tried to fill this gap in their lineup multiple times, failing more spectacularly every single time. Back in the PS2/Xbox era there was one platformer that came out both places and was actually pretty decent, Pac-Man World. These games were okay, but never really stood out that much.

Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures carries this torch under a different name. Everything about Ghostly Adventures has the makings of a perfectly serviceable 3D platformer, but when you start trying to piece all of the parts together they never quite click together in the way that you would expect them to.

For starters, the developers of Ghostly Adventures decided that they needed to create a story to try and explain why Pac-Man is in a 3D platformer. As might be expected, the story it absolutely terrible, it takes place on a planet named Pac-World and the main villain is named Betrayus. Pac-Man is voiced to sound like a 10 year old child and everyone else surrounding him sounds like they are at about the same age. The voice acting is awful, the story is awful, the character design is awful, everything about the game's aesthetics is just about as bad as it can get.

Even the environments that the levels take place in are about as generic as you could possibly get. Every different type of level feels like it was pulled directly from a 3D platformer checklist. There is a city world, an ice world and a jungle world among others, each with almost the exact same platforming gameplay design in a different set of window dressing.

Sure, aesthetics might make up the vast majority of what makes a 3D platformer stand out from the other ones on the market, but sometimes gameplay can help one of these titles distinguish itself as well. Sadly, Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures is not one of those titles. The game is extremely generic in the way it plays, but it does not bear much resemblance to modern 3D platformers.

Instead, Ghostly Adventures seems to deliberately choose to imitate 3D platformers of yore - perhaps the ones that originated the genre. The camera is clunky and unwieldy in a way that I have not seen since the original Spyro games, and the platforming itself does not fare much better.

Sure, Pac-Man Ghostly Adventures is a completely passable game in just about every single way, but that does not excuse it from criticism. Pac-Man was once a franchise that was always making excellent titles, and it seemed like games such as Pac-Man CE DX were going to be a return to those times.

Ghostly Adventures shows that Namco still expects to be able to wring money from a franchise that is losing more and more cache over the years by simply making a bad version of a modern Sonic platformer and slapping Pac-Man in it. This game does nothing to improve the 3D platformer on non-Nintendo platforms, and I honestly can't see a future in which any Pac-Man game does that. If you have kids that are really into Pac-Man, this isn't terrible, but everyone else should stay away.

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Posted:
2013-05-22

monty

Super Gamer Dude

7.7

BioShock Infinite is the third installment in the BioShock series and although it is not an extension of the story told by the two earlier titles it does have much content that is thematically and conceptually similar.

The story is set in North America in 1912 and most of the action takes place in the 'floating' city of Columbia, whose very name is the personification of American maternal aspect, and whose location is in stark contrast to that of the city of Rapture which, as devotees of the series will know, is underwater. The city was founded as a Nativist ideal and is governed by The Founders a Nativist and Elitist political grouping. The Vox Populi. or the voice of the people, as the name suggests, are a populist grouping who support the poor but are regarded as something of a revolutionary movement. As expected the two sides do not see eye to eye and are in open conflict.

The other problem that the city faces, and perhaps more interesting from a gaming point of view, is the tearing of the spacetime continuum leading to momentary but meaningful glimpses, relative to, and suggestive of other eras.

So much for the overview. What about the specifics? Well, for one thing, the story, though not overly complex, does contain a great deal of character interaction and knowing references, but in outline deals with the rescue by Booker DeWitt of Elizabeth. However, there is much greater depth and meaning woven around this simple story and the characters themselves and their backgrounds are detailed and complicated.

The dramatic hero is Booker DeWitt, and it is he who the player controls. He is a disgraced former Pinkerton National Detective Agency investigator thrown out for his fondness of drink and gambling, but now working as an independent agent. Elizabeth is a highly educated young lady who has been held against her will for most of her life in Columbia. She is controlled by the game's AI, and crucially, can manipulate to some degree the spacetime continuum. Her rescue results in her and Dewitt being pursued by both political factions.

The other main characters are:-

The baddie, Father Zachary Hale Comstock, a religious fanatic and founder of Columbia and hence the Founders. To make things a little more complicated he claims to be Elizabeth's father as the result of the seven day pregnancy of his wife.

The leader of the Vox Populi and servant to Comstock is Daisy Fitzroy, an African American who came to Columbia to start a new life. Given the political orientation of the city, and the political views of her employer, this would seem to be a pretty stupid move.

Robert and Rosalind Lutece, mistakenly thought to be twins but who turn out be two sides of the same persona, pop up constantly throughout the story and are behind some of the city's technology, but are mostly in a sort of unrealized quantum state. They sort of are and then they sort of aren't.

Then there is Cornelius Slate a former soldier and fighting comrade of DeWitt, once a follower of Comstock, who became aware of his underhand dealings and converted to Vox Populi.

There are also many and various enemies in the shape of hard hitting heavies with names like the Handymen, so called because of their immense hands made for throwing things, including their enemies, over long distances. Others are the Boys of Silence, the Motorized Patriots and the Siren, each imaginatively designed and with powerful abilities.

But of course all this is of little worth if the game does not play well or the graphic and audio presentation is poor. So how does it fare?

As with previous BioShock titles it is a first person shooter with some degree of role playing, a wise choice given the popularity of the earlier games. DeWitt moves around Columbia mostly on foot or using a grappling hook and rope to traverse the main arterial routes which connect the city's main buildings which are composed of a system called the Skyline which is a futuristic type rail line in the sky. He is limited to carrying only two weapons at any one time, but these can consist of many different wisely chosen combinations.

Greater powers such as those of telekinesis and controlled use of electricity can be obtained by collecting 'vigors' found in various locations around Columbia. These are attacking abilities and strengths but defensive and damage limiting capabilities are also on offer. Both rely on collection, purchase or other upgrade methods for their accumulation and again require a conscious choice of combination to optimize their effectiveness for a particular task. Once Elizabeth has been rescued her time warping abilities can be used to open up access to ammunition, health packs and the like, not forgetting the all important Salt on which 'Vigors' rely.

Following the general trend of serious gaming, the year by year improvement of graphical presentation, the visual presentation of BioShock Infinite is outstanding in all aspects. The background and incidental music are equal in quality to the graphics, the voice acting being particularly fitting.

BioShock fans will certainly buy the game on the strength of previous titles alone, and newcomers, after playing Infinite will want to take a look at BioShock's other offerings.

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Posted:
2013-05-22

monty

Super Gamer Dude

5.0

Aliens was an iconic movie that remains an industry classic, and Aliens Colonial Marines was designed and intended as a direct sequel to the film. For how long the game was in development, fans expected a pretty good game to come from the classic James Cameron film. In retrospect, maybe they should have worked on it a bit longer. Instead of giving a feeling of terror, of being hunted, the game feels like every other shooter you've ever played, except that you're way overpowered, turning combat into a shooting gallery. The only possible saving grace are the multiplayer modes; unfortunately, these won't be fleshed out until a DLC package is released with more maps. The graphics are pretty bad as well, and the game is marred by a number of technical issues.

The story mode in a game that is supposed to come as a sequel to the horror/action film Aliens should impart some kind of sense of fear or anxiety while playing. At the very least, you should feel rushed and harried. Aliens Colonial Marines completely fails on this point. Instead, you get a game that simply feels like most other shooters, with some notable, and negative, exceptions to the rule. First of all, the AI is absolutely terrible. Both your teammates and the enemies are unintelligent and predictable. Also, you can carry as many guns as you want, and the weapons you have are overpowered, making the game feel much too easy. The campaign playthrough lasts around six hours, and you probably won't ever play it again. You'll feel a sense of elation and nostalgia at first (if you're a fan of the movies), but that's about it, and that feeling quickly wears off when faced with the frustrating gameplay.

Multiplayer isn't so bad. The best mode that the game has is called escape, which is eerily reminiscent of a Left 4 Dead mission. You run along with a team of marines, rushing to weld doors shut behind you as you fight off Aliens and try to escape. If that's all the game has to offer, you're better off spending your money elsewhere.

Some of the biggest complaints about the game come from its graphical quality. Problems run rampant, with everything from aliasing and low resolution to world objects (like your gun) simply disappearing from view for a while. Critical reviews of the game were mostly negative. IGN rated the game a rarely-seen 4.5/10, and aggregate scorer Metacritic scored it at 49/100. User reviews on Metacritic rated it even lower, with an average score of 4/10. Players mostly complain about the poor graphical quality and stunningly horrid AI, with hordes of Aliens simply charging you from the front with no intelligence whatsoever.

It's very difficult to put a positive spin on this game at all. If you're a diehard fan and want the game for that reason, wait a month and get it on sale. Until then, don't waste your money.

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Posted:
2013-12-27

monty

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Rocksmith for the PlayStation 3 promises to make a guitar bassist or lead soloist out of anyone prepared to take the instrument seriously.

Plug yourself in and and you are ready to go, the PC will process and amplify the sounds you make. The method it uses is pretty well standard in that it plays a series of notes, listens to your attempts and marks your efforts. Some of the basic riffs and chord shapes are easy enough but software can take you much farther.

There are exercises presented in the form of mini games to get you used to the fretboard, eventually the guitar should be an extension of you body, and moving up and down the keyboard should become instinctive. The lower reaches of the fretboard, that is the higher notes, are unfamiliar ground to many would be classical guitarists but ought to be a well known area to a would be electric lead.

No matter what the software claims to do it cannot make you a musician in the true sense of the word. That is a gift which is not its to give, but it can point you in the right direction by giving you the basic mechanics and making you feel at home with your instrument.

This package is really aimed at the complete novice for who even learning the basics is a massive step forward and also has a certain novelty value even if your musical ambitions are not serious. Really advanced playing comes with loads of dedication, discipline, practice and development of individual style, something that comes from within and not from a teacher, electronic or otherwise. Behind the stage showmanship of the great rock guitarists lies some solid instrumental know how. The only real judge of quality is the sound heard by the human ear and those guys get marked by you and not by a machine.

Musicianship needs a long apprenticeship but if you never take the first step along the road you will never get there and if you have never played before then this is well worth trying out as learning the first steps to making any sort of music is rewarding for its own sake, and once you become addicted there is no stopping.

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Posted:
2014-02-22

monty

Super Gamer Dude

8.4

Rockstar games is at it again and has developed an open world third person shooting game similar to the Grand Theft Auto Franchise. L.A. Noire for the Xbox 360 comes to you taking place in the year 1947 in Los Angeles California. You are in the middle of many incidents going on all throughout the city as a police detective for the Los Angeles Police Department. Since this game takes place in the late 1940s you are going to have to expect to be involved in a lot of gangster cases.

The team that actually developed L.A. Noire is Team Bondi and the game was published by Rockstar Games. For those gamers that appreciate unique gameplay and a mind blogging play the whole way through will find much interest here. Do not expect to run and gun your way through this game. L.A. Noire aims at taking gamers in a different direction. L.A. Noire is focused more on your detective skills and ability to assess situations that unfold in front of you rather than a full on assault.

One feature this game has that a lot of people enjoyed was the interrogations conducted throughout the game. As a detective you have to ask people questions, and based on their response you form an opinion on if you think they are telling the truth or not. This adds an interesting element to the game because you have to decipher how to read someone based on the situation that has unfolded, their tone of voice and their overall facial expressions while you ask them questions. This element L.A. Noire makes it very fun for those gamers who like to try and decipher questions and mysteries. Yet for those who simply like to run around and shoot things this is not your type of game.

Overall L.A. Noire is a moderately fun game. Because of the slow paced feel gamers can find themselves getting a little agitated and ready for action at times. Not that there is not a lack of action in the game, but for those who are looking for a Grand Theft Auto type of feel to the game look elsewhere. This game is fun for the gamers who do not mind spending a little extra time and effort to figure out clues provided throughout the game. The story is one of the most interesting aspects of the game and it feels as if you were in a movie when you are playing.

Anyone who wants to try a completely unique game should give L.A. Noire a try. The Xbox 360 offers high quality graphics and sound while you are playing through the game. Remember that there is downloadable content expected to be periodically be released in the coming future for the game so it does have some replay value. L.A. Noire is a fun and interesting experience.

User Reviews

Thief PS4 - 21 reviews

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Posted:
2014-03-22

monty

Super Gamer Dude

6.0

As a genre, it has always seemed like stealth came and went as it pleased, much as the characters within these games often do to elude detection. Right now, we seem to be in a rather good phase for the stealth game in general. Between the introduction of new mechanics in independent games like Mark of the Ninja, the creation of exciting new franchises like Dishonored, or the return of storied franchises of yore like Metal Gear Solid or Splinter Cell, there is a lot for Stealth gamers to love. Sadly, the latest version of one of the older stealth franchises there is, Thief, is not one of these games.

The Thief games have been going for almost a full decade, and in the early days of preview coverage, it looked like Thief was going to be able to implement new mechanics from games such as Dishonored while still maintaining the feeling of a Thief game. Sadly, it seems like the constant rumors of serious development problems were well-founded, and there are countless issues that plague what is a game that maintains an interesting concept at its core.

Drawing a comparison between this game and the still somewhat recent Dishonored is almost a bit eerie. Both games involve rather similar plots involving a plague and some sort of dark voodoo magic behind everything, and Thief borrows quite a few ideas from Dishonored, including the existence of several small hub worlds within which are story missions as well as a selection of different side missions that the main character Garrett can choose to undertake or not.

The problem with Thief trying to use these mechanics is that it uses the same high roofs and narrow walkways without considering the fact that it is lacking the one thing that made traversing Dishonored’s world fun, the magical powers. Sure, at the core of Thief’s story lies some magical conspiracy that even after finishing the game remains a bit murky to me, but none of that really manifests itself within the gameplay, leaving you to clumsily search for ways to get up on roofs using context sensitive button presses.

Those button prompts are just the beginning of how Thief seems to constrain you, though. Whereas the older Thief games, particularly the first one, created a sort of open world even within the enclosed spaces of homes and sewer tunnels, every time the player enters a mission in this new Thief, they make a transition from a semi-open hub world to a painfully linear set of hallways and rooms. There is some freedom to how you deal with enemies, but the easy way out is always just to sneak up behind them and knock them out, which isn’t hard thanks to the awful enemy AI.

Even stealing things in this new Thief feels wrong. Every time you would steal something in the older Thief games, it felt like a big score, like you were really achieving something. Here, Garrett is stealing literally everything that he can get his hands on from single gold coins to handheld mirrors. Instead of feeling like a master thief, Garrett instead feels like an insane kleptomaniac roaming through the city looking to steal garbage.

Even though the franchise is older than that of Dishonored, everything about this new Thief game feels like it was cribbed from Dishonored and then immediately made worse. Thief feels like what a cheaply produced knock-off version of Dishonored might feel like, and that is its biggest problem. If you like any number of the ideas that Thief puts forward, try out Dishonored.

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Posted:
2014-03-25

monty

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Many 3D platformers have been produced for the handheld consoles but there has been a definite lack of these, especially for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, or at least good ones. In the past, the PlayStation systems have had banner franchises like Jak and Daxter or Ratchet and Clank, but those franchises have fallen by the wayside, meaning that anyone who does not own a Nintendo system is often hard pressed to find a 3D platformer to play.

Microsoft in particular has tried to fill this gap in their lineup multiple times, failing more spectacularly every single time. Back in the PS2/Xbox era there was one platformer that came out both places and was actually pretty decent, Pac-Man World. These games were okay, but never really stood out that much.

Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures carries this torch under a different name. Everything about Ghostly Adventures has the makings of a perfectly serviceable 3D platformer, but when you start trying to piece all of the parts together they never quite click together in the way that you would expect them to.

For starters, the developers of Ghostly Adventures decided that they needed to create a story to try and explain why Pac-Man is in a 3D platformer. As might be expected, the story it absolutely terrible, it takes place on a planet named Pac-World and the main villain is named Betrayus. Pac-Man is voiced to sound like a 10 year old child and everyone else surrounding him sounds like they are at about the same age. The voice acting is awful, the story is awful, the character design is awful, everything about the game's aesthetics is just about as bad as it can get.

Even the environments that the levels take place in are about as generic as you could possibly get. Every different type of level feels like it was pulled directly from a 3D platformer checklist. There is a city world, an ice world and a jungle world among others, each with almost the exact same platforming gameplay design in a different set of window dressing.

Sure, aesthetics might make up the vast majority of what makes a 3D platformer stand out from the other ones on the market, but sometimes gameplay can help one of these titles distinguish itself as well. Sadly, Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures is not one of those titles. The game is extremely generic in the way it plays, but it does not bear much resemblance to modern 3D platformers.

Instead, Ghostly Adventures seems to deliberately choose to imitate 3D platformers of yore - perhaps the ones that originated the genre. The camera is clunky and unwieldy in a way that I have not seen since the original Spyro games, and the platforming itself does not fare much better.

Sure, Pac-Man Ghostly Adventures is a completely passable game in just about every single way, but that does not excuse it from criticism. Pac-Man was once a franchise that was always making excellent titles, and it seemed like games such as Pac-Man CE DX were going to be a return to those times.

Ghostly Adventures shows that Namco still expects to be able to wring money from a franchise that is losing more and more cache over the years by simply making a bad version of a modern Sonic platformer and slapping Pac-Man in it. This game does nothing to improve the 3D platformer on non-Nintendo platforms, and I honestly can't see a future in which any Pac-Man game does that. If you have kids that are really into Pac-Man, this isn't terrible, but everyone else should stay away.


  Viewing Reviews 1-10 of 21