User Review

10 Reviews


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Posted:
2014-02-21

dipper

Super Gamer Dude

9.0

With Arkham Asylum's release in 2009, gamers everywhere were stunned. Licensed games, and particularly licensed games involving superheroes, have had a notorious reputation in the gaming industry for being little more than sub-par cash-ins or cheaply produced throwaway titles. Developer Rocksteady Studios took those preconceptions and tore through them mercilessly, giving players the chance to control the dark knight as he explored the dark depths of Gotham's infamous madhouse, the titular Arkham Asylum. The game was met with tremendous acclaim world-wide, winning numerous awards and setting a steep new standard for licensed titles.

Expectations for a sequel were suitably high following the success of the original. But would Rocksteady be able to once again deliver on all accounts? To put it simply...yes. Arkham City not only lives up to the acclaim of its predecessor; it knocks it out of the ball park and asserts itself as the new kingpin with nary a scratch. Gritty, beautiful, and expansive, Arkham City oozes with atmosphere and an unbelievable amount of polish.

Why is it so good? Plainly put, the game gets just about every detail right. It's a tightly-knight, smoothly-oiled experience that very rarely stutters in any regard. Rocksteady Studios aptly utilizes the power of the Unreal Engine 3, pushing the game's visuals into the stratosphere. Don't believe me? Play it for yourself, and prepare to be blown away. Dynamic lighting provides lush visual detail, giving already excellent textures a nuanced layer of polish. From the way light plays across Catwoman's provocative bodysuit to the beautifully realized Gothic beauty of the city itself, the visuals go a long way in immersing the player knee-deep in what is already an unforgettable experience.

The plot, without giving anything away, is a valuable addition to the Dark Knight's legacy, filled to the brim with classic villains and references sure to put a smile on any Batman fan's face. True to the animated series, the game utilizes the immense vocal talents of Mark Hamill and Kevin Conroy, reprising their roles as the Joker and Batman, respectively. Of course, the game features a plethora of talented voice actors, but to list them all seems rather unnecessary for the purposes of this review. From start to finish, Arkham City grips the player tightly around the neck and refuses to let go. And this is one game that doesn't skimp on an ending. It ends in such a way that you'll likely have a hard time picking your jaw up off the floor for a while. It's that good.

The game runs particularly well on both the Xbox 360 but and the PlayStation 3 but Nintendo's console doesn't boast any significant advantages that make the game any less enjoyable to play on other systems. It's hard to think of a single thing wrong with the game, but if anything, the 'advanced augmented reality gliding missions' are brutally difficult to an unfair degree. But factor in everything this game gets right, and you have what's easily one of the best games of 2011.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-02-21

dipper

Super Gamer Dude

7.5

Plenty can change in six years, especially in an industry as tumultuous as video games. Hitman Absolution, a linear sequel in a franchise with quite a widespread fanbase, comes out six years after its last installment in a time when almost all blockbuster gaming franchises are churning out at least one new sequel every year. One of these remarkable franchises is Assassin's Creed. This came out the same year as the last Hitman game and has since then dominated the third person stealth assassin genre. Assassin's Creed took what was clunky and frustrating about crowd navigation in Hitman and made it an exciting aspect of intense parkour chases. Both franchises employ equally ridiculous science fiction narratives, but gamers have certainly latched more onto Assassin's Creed's mix of futuristic sci-fi and renaissance gallantry than Hitman's somewhat confusing, clone based story. So now that Hitman Absolution is out, will the former reigning king retake the thrown?

The most surprising thing about Hitman Absolution is the immediate sense that developer IO interactive has not missed a beat. Game sequels coming out years after their predecessors tend to get stuck in the now outdated mechanics of their previous installment. All is well in Absolution however, players picking up this game without knowledge of its history will likely never know of the franchise's six year hiatus. In fact, Agent 47 controls better than ever, navigating massive crowds in environments teeming with life has always been a part of Hitman's genius. The influence of this is seen in Assassin's Creed and almost any other stealth game on the market right now.

The AI in the crowds and open levels in this game are superb, and that's a mammoth accomplish within itself. The worse part of bad AI is that when a gamer notices it, their experience is tainted by the reminder of the programming behind the game The illusion of the action being organic and based on the player's decisions is instantly shattered. This won't happen to players in Absolution. Every crowd and individual NPC reaction is a direct result of player action. This is a huge and surprising step up on Assassin's Creed, which is marred by aggressively poor AI. Agent 47 controls too like the perfect killing machine. Disguises are still his forte and the main tactic he uses to finish a job unnoticed. Full blown gun battles control smoothly too however, both stealth and brute force are equally effective ways to complete a mission.

The beauty of this game cannot be understated either. The open levels feature expansive views and environments that are as gorgeous up close as they are far away. The 20 hours plus campaign is brilliantly paced and additional replay value is added in the all new Contract Mode. The basic concept is that gamers create unique contracts for other players to attempt over Xbox live. It's essentially the world's biggest game of murder HORSE.

Hitman Absolution is a fantastic entry in a series that slipped away just as it caught solid footing. Every gamer, especially fans of Assassin's Creed, should at least consider renting it.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-05-25

dipper

Super Gamer Dude

7.5

Plenty can change in six years, especially in an industry as tumultuous as video games. Hitman Absolution, a linear sequel in a franchise with quite a widespread fanbase, comes out six years after its last installment in a time when almost all blockbuster gaming franchises are churning out at least one new sequel every year. One of these remarkable franchises is Assassin's Creed. This came out the same year as the last Hitman game and has since then dominated the third person stealth assassin genre. Assassin's Creed took what was clunky and frustrating about crowd navigation in Hitman and made it an exciting aspect of intense parkour chases. Both franchises employ equally ridiculous science fiction narratives, but gamers have certainly latched more onto Assassin's Creed's mix of futuristic sci-fi and renaissance gallantry than Hitman's somewhat confusing, clone based story. So now that Hitman Absolution is out, will the former reigning king retake the thrown?

The most surprising thing about Hitman Absolution is the immediate sense that developer IO interactive has not missed a beat. Game sequels coming out years after their predecessors tend to get stuck in the now outdated mechanics of their previous installment. All is well in Absolution however, players picking up this game without knowledge of its history will likely never know of the franchise's six year hiatus. In fact, Agent 47 controls better than ever, navigating massive crowds in environments teeming with life has always been a part of Hitman's genius. The influence of this is seen in Assassin's Creed and almost any other stealth game on the market right now.

The AI in the crowds and open levels in this game are superb, and that's a mammoth accomplish within itself. The worse part of bad AI is that when a gamer notices it, their experience is tainted by the reminder of the programming behind the game The illusion of the action being organic and based on the player's decisions is instantly shattered. This won’t happen to players in Absolution. Every crowd and individual NPC reaction is a direct result of player action. This is a huge and surprising step up on Assassin's Creed, which is marred by aggressively poor AI. Agent 47 controls too like the perfect killing machine. Disguises are still his forte and the main tactic he uses to finish a job unnoticed. Full blown gun battles control smoothly too however, both stealth and brute force are equally effective ways to complete a mission.

The beauty of this game cannot be understated either. The open levels feature expansive views and environments that are as gorgeous up close as they are far away. The 20 hours plus campaign is brilliantly paced and additional replay value is added in the all new Contract Mode. The basic concept is that gamers create unique contracts for other players to attempt over Xbox live. It's essentially the world's biggest game of murder HORSE.

Hitman Absolution is a fantastic entry in a series that slipped away just as it caught solid footing. Every gamer, especially fans of Assassin's Creed, should at least consider renting it.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-05-25

dipper

Super Gamer Dude

8.0

Metal Gear Solid HD Collection is a high definition remaster of Metal Gear Solid 2, 3 and Peace Walker and the two MSX Metal Gear games, Metal Gear 1 and 2. This collection is released for the PS3, Playstation Vita and Xbox 360. For a special promotion, the PS3 digital download version also came with a promotional download code for Metal Gear Solid 1. Every game in the collection, with the exception of the MSX games, runs at 720p and 60 frames per second. In addition to the graphical enhancements, these ports have been enhanced with trophies on the PS3 and achievements on the Xbox 360.

This collection, in a word, is immense, containing every game in the official Metal Gear storyline with the exception of the PS3 exclusive Metal Gear Solid 4. The series follows the intertwining stories of Big Boss and Solid Snake, alternating between the past, where Big Boss is the naive special agent protagonist and the future, where his clone, Solid Snake, attempts to foil the organization Big Boss created. The series is renown for it's clever meta narrative and fourth wall breaking, using side conversations with support characters to comment on the story as it's happening over the codec communicator. Across all three games there are dozens of hours of optional content based on these codec conversations that flesh out the world of the Metal Gear Solid series.

The original two MSX Metal Gear games are a bonus as part of MGS3, which is a treat for US players, as the two simplified Metal Gear games released for the NES bear little resemblance to these games, which were never released in the US due to the fact that the MSX was a Japan-only console. Metal Gear 2 in particular seems distinctly like a prequel to Metal Gear Solid 1 and plays in a very similar fashion, as it introduces the active radar that shows enemy soldiers and cameras that are so familiar in the later games in the series.

The graphics are mostly unaltered from the original versions, aside from the resolution upgrade and the advantage of running on superior hardware, and the soundtracks have been remastered for 5.1 sound. However, the gameplay in MGS3 and Peace Walker have been altered slightly. In MGS3, the version included in the collection is the Subsistence Edition, which changes the camera angle from a top-down view to slightly behind the player for a less clumsy playing experience. Because Peace Walker was a PSP game, the port to the MGS HD Collection accommodates the second analog controller nub, which gives the player full control over the camera.

For modern players who've never given the series a try before, there's no more attractive package, especially since this is the first time most of these games are available on a non-Playstation game system. Metal Gear Solid 1, 2 and 3 are two of the highest rated games on the PS1 + PS2 and hold up extraordinarily well, promising dozens of hours of gameplay.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-05-25

dipper

Super Gamer Dude

8.0

One important thing that you need to do before you start playing this game is to read the instructions to know the different functions of the editing tools provided. Although there are no scoring chains or even weapon upgrades in this game, you can still actually enjoying playing Blast Works by turning the enemy you destroyed against its previous allies. Your ship will confiscate your defeated enemy making them your shield in fighting the rest of its followers. Your goal in this game is to be fast and skillful enough to avoid the bullets. It does not require much strategy so it would not be so surprising if you get bored eventually.

This game can be played in an hour with 15 campaign levels and because each level looks more like a template, you may get tired of seeing similar shooting environment on your screen. The good thing about it is that you can change and edit everything including your enemy’s tanks and ships. If you would master the editing tool, you can create the most imaginative tanks and armors. In fact, it is the strength of this game, the opportunity for its players to be inventive using the elaborate editing tool. However, you are only limited to three basic shapes; square, triangle and circle but you can adjust these shapes and color them according to your penchant. It may be a challenge in the beginning to perfect the figure you have in mind, but with intensive practice, you will be able to create the exact form you have always wanted to create.

Another exciting twist about Blast Works is that you do not just create your own weapons and war crafts; you also get to create and customize your enemy’s weapons or even their fight plans and pattern. After getting the right shapes and figures for your fleet and your enemy’s, you can start having adventure using the camera. You can zoom, slow down or position the camera in whatever angle you want to get that dramatic feel you want your battle ground to have.

The graphics of Blast Works can be considered unsophisticated, more so because everything is created thru the editing tool and it is already up to you and your creativity to make the dull interface as exciting and vibrant as possible. The controller is also accurate and works perfectly well in the battle field but its functions are limited to shooting and turning your enemies invisible. In the long run, this game is worth playing if you want to keep those creative juices flowing and satisfy the imaginative side of you.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-05-31

dipper

Super Gamer Dude

7.8

There are those times where new games are released with the same concept but with a different flavor. We love to take on the challenge but don't want to get frustrated with the new controls and innovative gameplay. Skate It is one of those games which you can easily get a hang of and at the same time get the feeling that the game is something really worth the effort, though it's not hard to learn. And you'll get nostalgic as it felt the same way as you came across learning those games that really changed the way gameplay is made now.

Skate It may get you familiar with some of its similar games like Tony Hawk. Although it might not get the same things as you get at Tony Hawk, but definitely it's trying to discover new ways for you to enjoy. With these types of games, there is no doubt you'll get the rock music on the background sound. Also, Skate It was also based on last year's Skate.

The game can be played with different controllers, you can use just the Wii remote itself but as you try to get those moves, you'll get a staggering experience trying to tilt your way through some stunts. With the nunchuk however would be a different story, you'll get better balance and steer and you'll get the experience much likely better. The game wasn't really built as same as what you have with Tony Hawk. Tony Hawk emphasizes on the rush of the game, unlike Skate it, where you it opens up new ideas of tricks and stunts as you go along. Another controller would be the Wii Balance Board, which was only available through Wii Fit bundle. But definitely this controller would be your best bet, just like Top Skater from Sega, you'll get the feeling you're actually doing the tricks and this also improve on your actual posture.

As mentioned, Skate it is different from its counterparts. And it really separates from the rest of the bunch. It also introduces a different control, the Flickit as they call it. With this addition in-game and with a bit of experimenting you'll get the hang of the stunts you want to pull. As it implies you need to flick your wii remote either downwards or upwards. There is the tilting and swinging of your remote, to get different stunts. But as you try different things, it's fairly easy to comprehend.

Skate It totally shake things up with this innovative and brave release of a game. With the concept of skateboarding and the technology of the Wii, there is no doubt, it was nicely thought. So, don't expect you'll get everything on one try and it would only take you a few minutes to get used to with the controls, give it time and it is there, it is most rewarding. It is where that what you've learn from the previous platforms are just games where Skate It really gave it a different taste.

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Posted:
2013-05-25

dipper

Super Gamer Dude

8.0

The story is based on the time period of Japan where a bunch of states fought each other to rule the country. You select from a large number of historical characters and then begin playing through the game modes which tell different parts of the story. The first portion lets you work towards unifying all of Japan. The second puts you in a haunted castle and has you fighting demons. The third doesn't tell any of the story, but it allows players to play freely on any level.

Once you actually get into a level, you’ll realize exactly how similar this game is to previous titles. Your character is, obviously, way more powerful than any enemy they’ll come across. These enemies are merely walking fodder for your sword, and you’ll freely slaughter through them again and again. While this was once acceptable in an adventure game, game designers have gotten lazy at trying to make it fun for players, which results in your character getting really good at the couple of moves they have available as the AI runs right into your blade like wheat to the scythe. Smarter AI would have really made the game a lot more fun to play.

While bad gameplay is one thing, bad graphics is a whole other story. Samurai Warriors 3 doesn’t try extremely hard to make the characters that are on screen look very good, which is a shame, considering there isn't really a whole lot else going on in the gameplay or the story. In addition, the game only allows some enemies on screen at once, which means despite your capability for enormous destructive power, you’ll be forced to kill only a few enemies at a time. One positive thing is that the game doesn't seem to suffer from much slowdown, even with two-player split screen, but that’s probably because of the few enemies allowed on screen at once.

There is a lot of gameplay to be had, if you can find it in yourself to keep smashing through the game. There are bunches of characters that can be unlocked, as well as playing online, or the above-mentioned split-screen with a friend. The only problem, however, is suffering through the gameplay to get all that stuff.

And that’s what it really comes down to. Some hack-and-slash adventure games have enough unique, new content and gameplay that they are somewhat fun to play through, even though the repetition usually is boring by the end. Samurai Warriors 3 is not one of those games.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-05-26

dipper

Super Gamer Dude

7.6

Metal Gear Solid HD Collection is a high definition remaster of Metal Gear Solid 2, 3 and Peace Walker and the two MSX Metal Gear games, Metal Gear 1 and 2. This collection is released for the PS3, Playstation Vita and Xbox 360. For a special promotion, the PS3 digital download version also came with a promotional download code for Metal Gear Solid 1. Every game in the collection, with the exception of the MSX games, runs at 720p and 60 frames per second. In addition to the graphical enhancements, these ports have been enhanced with trophies on the PS3 and achievements on the Xbox 360.

This collection, in a word, is immense, containing every game in the official Metal Gear storyline with the exception of the PS3 exclusive Metal Gear Solid 4. The series follows the intertwining stories of Big Boss and Solid Snake, alternating between the past, where Big Boss is the naive special agent protagonist and the future, where his clone, Solid Snake, attempts to foil the organization Big Boss created. The series is renown for it's clever meta narrative and fourth wall breaking, using side conversations with support characters to comment on the story as it's happening over the codec communicator. Across all three games there are dozens of hours of optional content based on these codec conversations that flesh out the world of the Metal Gear Solid series.

The original two MSX Metal Gear games are a bonus as part of MGS3, which is a treat for US players, as the two simplified Metal Gear games released for the NES bear little resemblance to these games, which were never released in the US due to the fact that the MSX was a Japan-only console. Metal Gear 2 in particular seems distinctly like a prequel to Metal Gear Solid 1 and plays in a very similar fashion, as it introduces the active radar that shows enemy soldiers and cameras that are so familiar in the later games in the series.

The graphics are mostly unaltered from the original versions, aside from the resolution upgrade and the advantage of running on superior hardware, and the soundtracks have been remastered for 5.1 sound. However, the gameplay in MGS3 and Peace Walker have been altered slightly. In MGS3, the version included in the collection is the Subsistence Edition, which changes the camera angle from a top-down view to slightly behind the player for a less clumsy playing experience. Because Peace Walker was a PSP game, the port to the MGS HD Collection accommodates the second analog controller nub, which gives the player full control over the camera.

For modern players who've never given the series a try before, there's no more attractive package, especially since this is the first time most of these games are available on a non-Playstation game system. Metal Gear Solid 1, 2 and 3 are two of the highest rated games on the PS1 + PS2 and hold up extraordinarily well, promising dozens of hours of gameplay.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-01-30

dipper

Super Gamer Dude

5.0

The Adventures of Tintin is an action/adventure game released and developed by Ubisoft, and is based on the film of the same name. The game is mainly a platform title.

You get to play as Tintin, Snowy, and in the final battle, Captain Haddock. The game offers a third person view, and not a side scrolling perspective as most platformers do.

Playing as Tintin, a young reporter/journalist who will stop at nothing to get a break on a tasty story, despite the huge amounts of trouble it may cause him. One day he buys a model ship Unicorn on a whim, and shortly after you discover that there is a lot more to this ship than meets the eye, and it is your job to unravel the mystery, as well as to fend off multitudes of bad guys while doing so. Most of the action takes place in mansions, underground caverns, and the deep in bowels of ships.

Tintin's wide array of skills make all these tasks seem simple. Wall climbing, jumping, running, and getting over and around obstacles, are way too smooth and easy, and it never feels like there is an ounce of skill involved in doing so. Some of your movements are automated making it kid friendly, and a breeze for anyone with skills at gaming. This also applies to combat. Pressing one button lets you sail through most enemies without much difficulty, and when tough enemies do arise, you just sneak past them. The Adventures of Tintin tries to shake things up with a few puzzles, but these are also so simplistic! Some of the puzzles include searching for levers to open different pathways, or using weights to get the correct balance on seesaw machines.

In this game you get access to vehicles, but the parts you play with them are too easy as well. You get to pilot a plane through a storm, where you avoid tornadoes and attack other aircraft, but you can do each action with the push of just one button. They also give you a bike, but when you ride on it, it is also very easy to catch other bikes and hit them with your slingshot. And after a couple of hours of playing you will soon start to realize that everything feels familiar. Repetition is huge in this game, and lots of puzzles and vehicle scenes are constantly repeated, making the game very boring.

The Adventures of Tintin is just an average family game, and if you're a serious gamer looking for a challenge you should certainly skip this one. There are plenty of more challenging platform games out there to test your mettle.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-01-30

dipper

Super Gamer Dude

8.2

With Arkham Asylum's release in 2009, gamers everywhere were stunned. Licensed games, and particularly licensed games involving superheroes, have had a notorious reputation in the gaming industry for being little more than sub-par cash-ins or cheaply produced throwaway titles. Developer Rocksteady Studios took those preconceptions and tore through them mercilessly, giving players the chance to control the dark knight as he explored the dark depths of Gotham's infamous madhouse, the titular Arkham Asylum. The game was met with tremendous acclaim world-wide, winning numerous awards and setting a steep new standard for licensed titles.

Expectations for a sequel were suitably high following the success of the original. But would Rocksteady be able to once again deliver on all accounts? To put it simply...yes. Arkham City not only lives up to the acclaim of its predecessor; it knocks it out of the ball park and asserts itself as the new kingpin with nary a scratch. Gritty, beautiful, and expansive, Arkham City oozes with atmosphere and an unbelievable amount of polish.

Why is it so good? Plainly put, the game gets just about every detail right. It's a tightly-knight, smoothly-oiled experience that very rarely stutters in any regard. Rocksteady Studios aptly utilizes the power of the Unreal Engine 3, pushing the game's visuals into the stratosphere. Don't believe me? Play it for yourself, and prepare to be blown away. Dynamic lighting provides lush visual detail, giving already excellent textures a nuanced layer of polish. From the way light plays across Catwoman's provocative bodysuit to the beautifully realized Gothic beauty of the city itself, the visuals go a long way in immersing the player knee-deep in what is already an unforgettable experience.

The plot, without giving anything away, is a valuable addition to the Dark Knight's legacy, filled to the brim with classic villains and references sure to put a smile on any Batman fan's face. True to the animated series, the game utilizes the immense vocal talents of Mark Hamill and Kevin Conroy, reprising their roles as the Joker and Batman, respectively. Of course, the game features a plethora of talented voice actors, but to list them all seems rather unnecessary for the purposes of this review. From start to finish, Arkham City grips the player tightly around the neck and refuses to let go. And this is one game that doesn't skimp on an ending. It ends in such a way that you'll likely have a hard time picking your jaw up off the floor for a while. It's that good.

The game runs particularly well on the Playstation 3, but Sony's console doesn't boast any significant advantages that make the game any less enjoyable to play on other systems. It's hard to think of a single thing wrong with the game, but if anything, the 'advanced augmented reality gliding missions' are brutally difficult to an unfair degree. But factor in everything this game gets right, and you have what's easily one of the best games of 2011.