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16 Reviews


  Viewing Reviews 1-10 of 16
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Posted:
2014-02-26

ckane

Super Gamer Dude

6.6

After years of development hell, Gearbox has finally delivered the much-anticipated return of the Aliens franchise back into the realm of video gaming. With the amount of hype surrounding Aliens Colonial Marines, we hope it meets the expectations. Simultaneously released on the PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, and PC, fans of the film series are expecting a decent representation of the Aliens universe. Unfortunately, this game has quite a few flaws in it.

Aliens Colonial Marines has had a fairly open development cycle, with the developers showing off the incredible textures, lighting and atmosphere. However, what we received as a final product was, in actuality, nowhere near what was promised. Being in development for over 5 years has really taken its toll on the environments. The small corridors that you'll have to fight through all look exactly the same, with little deviation between different areas. This is something that was acceptable in the early 2000s, but today it is a major eye sore.

The atmosphere also strays from what one would expect from a game based on the Aliens franchise. Instead of slowly sneaking around dimly lit rooms, awaiting a tough fight with a xenomorph, you are forced to run down narrow corridors where hordes of enemies come charging at you. The xenomorphs have become unintelligent, weak enemies that take only a few shots to kill. Gearbox took what was expected to be a creepy yet challenging game, and turned it into another corridor shooter.

Some good things that Gearbox included in the game are plenty of Easter eggs from the film's history. You will enter familiar rooms, meet famous characters and see things that will peak your interest. While this is a welcome addition to the Aliens universe, there is still a lot to be desired.

Multiplayer suffers from many of the same issues that are found in the single player campaign. There are only four different modes to play, plus co-op. The small corridors and the swarms of enemies hamper co-op play. It doesn't seem like there is an increased number of bad guys to compensate for the additional players, making the game incredibly easy to beat with a friend.

The adversarial matches are inadequate and fairly uninteresting. With the paltry weapon upgrades you'll be relying on interesting gameplay to convince yourself to play, of which there isn't any. When playing the xenomorphs themselves you will feel underpowered against the marines, while also experiencing a number of issues with the controls. These balancing problems could be fixed in a patch, and there is a number of paid DLC that will be arriving to expand your online experience. That is if you decide to stay for that long.

Aliens Colonial Marines just isn't a good representation of the Aliens franchise. The game feels more like one of the hundreds of generic shooters of the last decade rather than a scary horror game. The graphics are unacceptable for a game with such a large budget and development cycle. While there are some interesting throwbacks, even die hard fans of the series should pass this game up.

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Posted:
2013-05-28

ckane

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

It’s really too bad that the controls for the game end up being so difficult, because the actual game is essentially solid. It uses the standard version of the Warhammer universe rules, albeit a rather simplified version of those rules, that allows the focus of the game to be where it should be on battles. The story for Warhammer Battle March is that a force invades from the North, destroying all before them. You can play as any of the three involved sides, trying to either invade the known world with the Hordes of Chaos, defend it on the side of the Empire, or play as the Greenskin tribes, composed of orcs and goblins.

Because this is a game that is primarily focused on combat, you could expect it to not have an extremely deep storyline. In that, you would be correct, as the missions all follow a linear path and the story between missions involves a text scroll informing you of what your next mission will be. Some RTS games can make the storyline that the player is following be the most important part of the single-player game. A couple of real-time games from Blizzard come to mind. This one, however, doesn’'t take that step.

The battles that a player gets into as they play through the single-player campaign provide an opportunity for the negative aspects of the game itself to be made visible. Although the little characters look very visually appealing, as does the entire game itself, actually controlling those characters is a maddening enough experience to make it seem not even worth the effort. Using the control pad to control an enormous number of units, and set them properly facing the right direction, and control the other minute aspects that win battles in an RTS game, is not easy. It is accomplished through the use of various button pushes, the combination of which actually performs the action desired, like a unit using an item. The basic matrix interaction of units is one thing that the traditional RTS fan will understand, with certain units working better against some units than others.

When it comes down to it, Warhammer Battle March is a game that should be an entrant in the RTS world. It has scores of fans, a real-life game outside of computers, and a rich history. Like other RTS’s, however, it is better off being playing with a mouse and keyboard than a gamepad.

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Posted:
2013-05-28

ckane

Super Gamer Dude

7.9

The Assassin's Creed Revelations PC game is essentially about time travel and science fiction. In the game, you play as the assassin Ezio who travels all over Italy. There are even major real historic events in the game. The beauty and architecture is part of what makes it such a great game. You could travel around the various cities just sightseeing if you wanted. The Assassin's Creed franchise has been a work of art, and this installment is no different.

You can choose to use stealth or go in with swords swinging, part of what has made Assassin's Creed games so addictive is the fluid sword fighting. It just feels right when swinging that sword in a massive battle, and there are few companies that have mastered this as well as Ubisoft.

What's New For The Assassin's Creed Revelations PC Game?

Well, lets just say that you will find the new items for Assassin's Creed Revelations to be somewhat explosive! For example, you can choose from a large selection of bombs. Ezio has also been given a new sword, a hook blade, and lets just say that he is not shy about using it, and can perform some graphic kills when doing so. The hook blade will also come in handy for cutting the zip-lines which are all over the city. It really helps to make traveling around the city faster. On top of that, you can drop from the zip line and perform a super cool assassination.

Better Graphics Than Its Predecessors

Assassin's Creed Revelations comes with astounding graphics. Every game in this franchise has come with increasingly improved graphics, and this game is no exception. Aside from the outstanding graphics, gamers will also enjoy a great selection of soundtracks. In addition to all that, there has also been a slow motion camera added, which makes it cooler when you kill enemies.

Criticisms Of the Assassin's Creed Revelations PC Game

Despite being widely popular, there are still critics of this game. What are some of the criticisms of this game? Well, one of the criticisms is that this is simply more of the same game. Some people feel that Ubisoft is just pumping out more of the same and not doing anything truly original or new. An additional criticism is that the multiplayer map is too small. It would also have been nice if Ubisoft had spent more time on the actual single player mode and less on the multiplayer mode. One of the complaints was that the storyline was uninteresting, deteriorating and the single player game was too short.

Despite the critics, Assassin's Creed Revelations is still a massively playable game, so there has to be a reason for its popularity. People can hate the game until they are blue in the face, but the results show that there is something about this game that people love. Otherwise, they would not buy it. If you are looking to be entertained for a few hours, then Assassin's Creed Revelations can give you that.

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Posted:
2014-02-01

ckane

Super Gamer Dude

8.9

Call of Duty has always been a series with developers who would go above and beyond to meet the desires of an extremely varied fan base. Everyone plays Call of Duty. Your 9 year old neighbor in 4th grade? Yep, he plays even though his parents shouldn't let him. The 35 year old single girl across the street? Yep, her too. Your 57 year old uncle who served in Vietnam? Duh, he's an avid Call of Duty player also. With a fan base so varied you have to listen to any and all opinions. That every voice counts attitude is what led to the smash hit, Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare. Infinity Ward really knocked that one out of the park and now Treyarch is stepping up to the plate to take their cuts with Call of Duty: World At War. Using the familiar, some would say too familiar, setting of World War II, Call of Duty: World At War has a lot in common with it's popular predecessor.

Graphics 9/10

Utilizing the same engine from Call of Duty 4, Call of Duty: World At War looks great. One of my favorite improvements is the ability to have individual limbs blown off in battle. This is quite gruesome but definitely adds a whole new level of realism. The environments also look great and you'll really feel like you're in the forests of Germany or on the sandy beaches of Japan.

Sound 7.5/10

The sound effects in this game are off the charts and very life-like. Each gun sounds like it's supposed to and every enemy grenade blast will nearly lift you out of your seat, especially if you're using a surround sound headset. The main downfall in the sound department would have to be the voice acting. Some of the accents, especially the German and Japanese voices just sound kind of off. Also, the soundtrack leaves a lot to be desired, mainly due to the lack of variety.

Single Player 9/10

This game really shines in the single player department. You'll play as both a Russian and an American soldier. The plot is really easy to follow and constantly leaves you on the edge of your seat. It's a non-stop roller coaster ride with one wild and memorable moment after another. Another great thing about the single player is the highly addictive Nazi Zombies mode, where you're tasked with killing one zombie horde after another while trapped in a small room with lots of open/broken windows.

Multiplayer 9/10

As with any first-person shooter, Call of Duty: World At War's long term success depends almost solely on it's multiplayer. I'll start by saying, if you loved the multiplayer in Modern Warfare, you'll definitely love it here because it's almost identical. I'm not saying that's a bad thing. Quite the opposite actually, since Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare gained very high praise for it's multiplayer aspect. Even though they're nearly identical, World At War is not without it's own merits. One of my favorite additions was that of the Attack Dogs killstreak reward. Since choppers weren't in use by the military yet in World War II, Treyarch chose to replace them with something that was and man are they fun to unleash. You've also got to consider all the new maps and weapons. While there aren't as many maps as Modern Warfare, they certainly have a different feel. They're larger and a lot more open. This leads to many more opportunities for sniping, whereas Modern Warfare was more of a run and gun type game. The weapons you'll use on these new battlefields are so unique in comparison to those found in Modern Warfare and that goes a long way in making Call of Duty: World At War seem like a completely different experience.

Final Score 8/10

Treyarch picks up where Infinity Ward left off and delivers another tremendous addition to the Call of Duty series. Yes, they're similar but not so much so that I would recommend you skip Call of Duty: World At War if you've played Modern Warfare. The addictive Nazi Zombies mode alone makes this game a must have. Whether you're a history buff, first-person shooter fan, survival horror fan, or just a hardcore gamer, you can't really go wrong with Call of Duty: World At War. See you on the battlefield!

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Posted:
2014-03-18

ckane

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

While Thrillville isn't exactly a game made for adults, it's also not exactly a game made for kids. There are portions of it that are very easily accessible to children, and the game itself is full of enough fun and design options for adults to enjoy it too. Just like in everything it does, this game provides a balance that makes it an enjoyable experience for nearly anyone to play.

The single-player campaign game here has you playing the role of manager for a theme park. You start off with a single park with three different themed areas that you can fill with rides and games. As you build games and rides and complete tasks throughout your park, you unlock thrill points, which allows you to unlock new parks to build in.

There's no doubt that one of the best parts about this game is the capability to design your own roller-coaster, build it in your park, and then watch as people ride it and enjoy it. The process to do so is simple and intuitive, and there are even special pieces that can be added into your coaster, like loops, teardrops, and corkscrews. While adding these to your roller-coaster can be fun, you don't want to have too many of them, or else you'll raise the coaster's nausea rating too high and no one will want to ride it.

If building your own roller-coaster isn't your thing, then perhaps one of the fifty different mini-games that is a part of Thrillville will do it for you. These mini-games are a crucial part of the game itself, providing you with the means to be able to accomplish all the goals that you will have to do to properly take care of your park. Mini-games about repairing broken rides, mini-games about shooting enemies away from your park, mini-games throughout tell the story of your park, and allow you to do what is necessary to keep it up and running.

Although the gameplay itself is definitely on point in this game, the graphics tend to leave a little bit to be desired. There are frame rate stutters occasionally, as well as difficulties with rendering. The game also looks a little cartoonish, as well.

All told, Thrillville: Off the Rails has a whole lot going for it. It provides a level of enjoyment in the gameplay that few games possess today. While it's not perfect, it is a very well balanced game that is a whole lot of fun for gamers of any age, and isn't that what video games are really all about?

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Posted:
2014-03-18

ckane

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

While Thrillville isn't exactly a game made for adults, it's also not exactly a game made for kids. There are portions of it that are very easily accessible to children, and the game itself is full of enough fun and design options for adults to enjoy it too. Just like in everything it does, this game provides a balance that makes it an enjoyable experience for nearly anyone to play.

The single-player campaign game here has you playing the role of manager for a theme park. You start off with a single park with three different themed areas that you can fill with rides and games. As you build games and rides and complete tasks throughout your park, you unlock thrill points, which allows you to unlock new parks to build in.

There's no doubt that one of the best parts about this game is the capability to design your own roller-coaster, build it in your park, and then watch as people ride it and enjoy it. The process to do so is simple and intuitive, and there are even special pieces that can be added into your coaster, like loops, teardrops, and corkscrews. While adding these to your roller-coaster can be fun, you don't want to have too many of them, or else you'll raise the coaster's nausea rating too high and no one will want to ride it.

If building your own roller-coaster isn't your thing, then perhaps one of the fifty different mini-games that is a part of Thrillville will do it for you. These mini-games are a crucial part of the game itself, providing you with the means to be able to accomplish all the goals that you will have to do to properly take care of your park. Mini-games about repairing broken rides, mini-games about shooting enemies away from your park, mini-games throughout tell the story of your park, and allow you to do what is necessary to keep it up and running.

Although the gameplay itself is definitely on point in this game, the graphics tend to leave a little bit to be desired. There are frame rate stutters occasionally, as well as difficulties with rendering. The game also looks a little cartoonish, as well.

All told, Thrillville: Off the Rails has a whole lot going for it. It provides a level of enjoyment in the gameplay that few games possess today. While it's not perfect, it is a very well balanced game that is a whole lot of fun for gamers of any age, and isn't that what video games are really all about?

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-18

ckane

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

While Thrillville isn't exactly a game made for adults, it's also not exactly a game made for kids. There are portions of it that are very easily accessible to children, and the game itself is full of enough fun and design options for adults to enjoy it too. Just like in everything it does, this game provides a balance that makes it an enjoyable experience for nearly anyone to play.

The single-player campaign game here has you playing the role of manager for a theme park. You start off with a single park with three different themed areas that you can fill with rides and games. As you build games and rides and complete tasks throughout your park, you unlock thrill points, which allows you to unlock new parks to build in.

There's no doubt that one of the best parts about this game is the capability to design your own roller-coaster, build it in your park, and then watch as people ride it and enjoy it. The process to do so is simple and intuitive, and there are even special pieces that can be added into your coaster, like loops, teardrops, and corkscrews. While adding these to your roller-coaster can be fun, you don't want to have too many of them, or else you'll raise the coaster's nausea rating too high and no one will want to ride it.

If building your own roller-coaster isn't your thing, then perhaps one of the fifty different mini-games that is a part of Thrillville will do it for you. These mini-games are a crucial part of the game itself, providing you with the means to be able to accomplish all the goals that you will have to do to properly take care of your park. Mini-games about repairing broken rides, mini-games about shooting enemies away from your park, mini-games throughout tell the story of your park, and allow you to do what is necessary to keep it up and running.

Although the gameplay itself is definitely on point in this game, the graphics tend to leave a little bit to be desired. There are frame rate stutters occasionally, as well as difficulties with rendering. The game also looks a little cartoonish, as well.

All told, Thrillville: Off the Rails has a whole lot going for it. It provides a level of enjoyment in the gameplay that few games possess today. While it's not perfect, it is a very well balanced game that is a whole lot of fun for gamers of any age, and isn't that what video games are really all about?

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-18

ckane

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

While Thrillville isn't exactly a game made for adults, it's also not exactly a game made for kids. There are portions of it that are very easily accessible to children, and the game itself is full of enough fun and design options for adults to enjoy it too. Just like in everything it does, this game provides a balance that makes it an enjoyable experience for nearly anyone to play.

The single-player campaign game here has you playing the role of manager for a theme park. You start off with a single park with three different themed areas that you can fill with rides and games. As you build games and rides and complete tasks throughout your park, you unlock thrill points, which allows you to unlock new parks to build in.

There's no doubt that one of the best parts about this game is the capability to design your own roller-coaster, build it in your park, and then watch as people ride it and enjoy it. The process to do so is simple and intuitive, and there are even special pieces that can be added into your coaster, like loops, teardrops, and corkscrews. While adding these to your roller-coaster can be fun, you don't want to have too many of them, or else you'll raise the coaster's nausea rating too high and no one will want to ride it.

If building your own roller-coaster isn't your thing, then perhaps one of the fifty different mini-games that is a part of Thrillville will do it for you. These mini-games are a crucial part of the game itself, providing you with the means to be able to accomplish all the goals that you will have to do to properly take care of your park. Mini-games about repairing broken rides, mini-games about shooting enemies away from your park, mini-games throughout tell the story of your park, and allow you to do what is necessary to keep it up and running.

Although the gameplay itself is definitely on point in this game, the graphics tend to leave a little bit to be desired. There are frame rate stutters occasionally, as well as difficulties with rendering. The game also looks a little cartoonish, as well.

All told, Thrillville: Off the Rails has a whole lot going for it. It provides a level of enjoyment in the gameplay that few games possess today. While it's not perfect, it is a very well balanced game that is a whole lot of fun for gamers of any age, and isn't that what video games are really all about?

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-20

ckane

Super Gamer Dude

5.0

The adventurer has become one of the most powerful and popular archetypes in today's culture, and there are not any shortage of games that have made use of it in the past. The most popular recent examples of this archetype in gaming are Tomb Raider and Uncharted, and Deadfall Adventures hopes to add itself to that list. Sadly, the game fails to live up to much of anything, instead exhibiting a level of mediocrity that is far worse than simply being a bad game.

The game does look absolutely fantastic. Much of the game takes place in the desert, arctic, and jungle, with magnificent looking ancient monuments serving as this first person shooter's battlegrounds. Everything from the textures to the lighting really evokes the wonder of these old world ruins - but that's where the praise for this game has to end.

As soon as you stop staring at the magnificent environments and start moving around in them, the game begins to show its many flaws. You start the game by fighting Nazis, as just about any game set during that time period or blatantly trying to rip off Indiana Jones would have you do. These Nazis barely react when you shoot them with bullets before eventually falling down. Later, you'll encounter a number of different kinds of monsters like mummies and other undead, but while these certainly add a little bit of variety, they certainly don't manage to break up the monotony.

What games like Uncharted do best is break up the monotonous shooting and hiding behind cover with interesting puzzle sequences and an engaging story. Deadfall Adventures has neither of these things. The puzzles found in this game are extremely generic and simple to solve, assuming that they have not already been solved for you. Many puzzles simply require you to walk up and turn a single block, and those that don't are still very easy.

The story is about as rote as you can get for this sort of thing. Thanks to the presence of Nazis in the story and the very clear allusions to Indiana Jones, every single plot twist can be seen from a mile away - there's even a part of the game where you take a ride in a mine cart.

Many developers seem to think that competitive multiplayer is a requirement in the modern first person shooter, and so Deadfall Adventures has the requisite multiplayer modes that you would expect like deathmatch and capture the flag - and these modes are somewhat fun, but there's no real way to play them thanks to the fact that there is absolutely no one playing online.

Without a good story, good gameplay mechanics, or interesting puzzles, Deadfall Adventures fails at practically every single segment of a third person adventure game. Sure, the environments are beautifully crafted in a way that easily rivals some of the best games of this genre, but it seems like the vast majority of development resources went into making the game look as amazing as it possibly could in screenshots. All that work vanishes in an instant though, and all the player has to do is pick up the controller and start to play the game.

Thankfully, there are any number of other adventure games that you should play instead, including recent games like Call of Juarez Gunslinger. There is absolutely no reason to play this decidedly sub-par title where there are plenty other great gamers within the same genre that you can play without having to deal with any of the huge problems that seem to exist throughout Deadfall Adventures.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-20

ckane

Super Gamer Dude

5.0

The adventurer has become one of the most powerful and popular archetypes in today's culture, and there are not any shortage of games that have made use of it in the past. The most popular recent examples of this archetype in gaming are Tomb Raider and Uncharted, and Deadfall Adventures hopes to add itself to that list. Sadly, the game fails to live up to much of anything, instead exhibiting a level of mediocrity that is far worse than simply being a bad game.

The game does look absolutely fantastic. Much of the game takes place in the desert, arctic, and jungle, with magnificent looking ancient monuments serving as this first person shooter's battlegrounds. Everything from the textures to the lighting really evokes the wonder of these old world ruins - but that's where the praise for this game has to end.

As soon as you stop staring at the magnificent environments and start moving around in them, the game begins to show its many flaws. You start the game by fighting Nazis, as just about any game set during that time period or blatantly trying to rip off Indiana Jones would have you do. These Nazis barely react when you shoot them with bullets before eventually falling down. Later, you'll encounter a number of different kinds of monsters like mummies and other undead, but while these certainly add a little bit of variety, they certainly don't manage to break up the monotony.

What games like Uncharted do best is break up the monotonous shooting and hiding behind cover with interesting puzzle sequences and an engaging story. Deadfall Adventures has neither of these things. The puzzles found in this game are extremely generic and simple to solve, assuming that they have not already been solved for you. Many puzzles simply require you to walk up and turn a single block, and those that don't are still very easy.

The story is about as rote as you can get for this sort of thing. Thanks to the presence of Nazis in the story and the very clear allusions to Indiana Jones, every single plot twist can be seen from a mile away - there's even a part of the game where you take a ride in a mine cart.

Many developers seem to think that competitive multiplayer is a requirement in the modern first person shooter, and so Deadfall Adventures has the requisite multiplayer modes that you would expect like deathmatch and capture the flag - and these modes are somewhat fun, but there's no real way to play them thanks to the fact that there is absolutely no one playing online.

Without a good story, good gameplay mechanics, or interesting puzzles, Deadfall Adventures fails at practically every single segment of a third person adventure game. Sure, the environments are beautifully crafted in a way that easily rivals some of the best games of this genre, but it seems like the vast majority of development resources went into making the game look as amazing as it possibly could in screenshots. All that work vanishes in an instant though, and all the player has to do is pick up the controller and start to play the game.

Thankfully, there are any number of other adventure games that you should play instead, including recent games like Call of Juarez Gunslinger. There is absolutely no reason to play this decidedly sub-par title where there are plenty other great gamers within the same genre that you can play without having to deal with any of the huge problems that seem to exist throughout Deadfall Adventures.


  Viewing Reviews 1-10 of 16