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Posted:
2013-05-29

kandoo

Super Gamer Dude

7.50

Blizzard Entertainment released the fourth expansion for their massively popular MMORPG World of Warcraft on September 25, 2012. World of Warcraft: Mists of Pandaria picks up after the events of the previous expansion, Cataclysm Mists of Pandaria introduces a new continent, new questing zones, and raises the maximum player level to 90.

Mists of Pandaria introduces a new race and class for players to choose. The Pandaren race are giant pandas, and are faction-neutral in the beginning. Players can choose whether their Pandaren will be Horde or Alliance after a series of quests. The Monk class uses Energy like Rogues in DPS or tank spec, and Mana in healing spec. Monks also use a new resource called "Chi" which is used in advanced attack moves.

A unique aspect of this expansion pack is the vanity pet battle system. Players are able to battle their vanity pets against other player's vanity pets, or vanity pets that are found in the wild. Vanity pets can be trained to level 25, and players are able to capture vanity pets that are defeated in battle.

Mists of Pandaria utilizes a new questing system on the continent of Pandaria. Every zone in Pandaria has its own set of questing achievements, which players complete when they progress through the various quest chains. Every quest chain ends with an upgraded green item, and the final quest reward for the zone is usually a blue item. This new way of questing allows players to gain a better grasp of the progressive nature of the Mists of Pandaria story line.

Players will find a dramatic change to the talent point system. Blizzard removed talent points and spell ranks in favor of a single talent tree for each class. Players can choose a new talent every 15 levels, and they will find that many of the talents that used to be in the talent tree are now automatically in their Spellbooks.

A new series of instances, called Scenarios, are introduced in Mists of Pandaria. Scenarios are unique in that they do not require a tank or healing class for the group to be successful. Scenarios are available when players reach level 90. Scenarios are goal-based, and are designed to be completed quickly, usually within fifteen minutes.

Mists of Panderia also sees changes to Dungeons and Raids. There is now a Challenge Mode option for five-player Dungeons. In Challenge Mode, players' gear is normalized, and the players attempt to speed clear the Dungeon in a specified amount of time. Rewards in Challenge Mode may include mounts, pets, or titles.

World of Warcraft: Mists of Panderia provides exciting content for both beginning and established players. Players who enjoyed group questing may be disappointed at the expansions reliance on single-player quest chains and world phasing. Players will enjoy the changes that further evolves the game and keeps content feeling fresh after eight years.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-05-29

kandoo

Super Gamer Dude

7.50

Blizzard Entertainment released the fourth expansion for their massively popular MMORPG World of Warcraft on September 25, 2012. World of Warcraft: Mists of Pandaria picks up after the events of the previous expansion, Cataclysm Mists of Pandaria introduces a new continent, new questing zones, and raises the maximum player level to 90.

Mists of Pandaria introduces a new race and class for players to choose. The Pandaren race are giant pandas, and are faction-neutral in the beginning. Players can choose whether their Pandaren will be Horde or Alliance after a series of quests. The Monk class uses Energy like Rogues in DPS or tank spec, and Mana in healing spec. Monks also use a new resource called "Chi" which is used in advanced attack moves.

A unique aspect of this expansion pack is the vanity pet battle system. Players are able to battle their vanity pets against other player's vanity pets, or vanity pets that are found in the wild. Vanity pets can be trained to level 25, and players are able to capture vanity pets that are defeated in battle.

Mists of Pandaria utilizes a new questing system on the continent of Pandaria. Every zone in Pandaria has its own set of questing achievements, which players complete when they progress through the various quest chains. Every quest chain ends with an upgraded green item, and the final quest reward for the zone is usually a blue item. This new way of questing allows players to gain a better grasp of the progressive nature of the Mists of Pandaria story line.

Players will find a dramatic change to the talent point system. Blizzard removed talent points and spell ranks in favor of a single talent tree for each class. Players can choose a new talent every 15 levels, and they will find that many of the talents that used to be in the talent tree are now automatically in their Spellbooks.

A new series of instances, called Scenarios, are introduced in Mists of Pandaria. Scenarios are unique in that they do not require a tank or healing class for the group to be successful. Scenarios are available when players reach level 90. Scenarios are goal-based, and are designed to be completed quickly, usually within fifteen minutes.

Mists of Panderia also sees changes to Dungeons and Raids. There is now a Challenge Mode option for five-player Dungeons. In Challenge Mode, players' gear is normalized, and the players attempt to speed clear the Dungeon in a specified amount of time. Rewards in Challenge Mode may include mounts, pets, or titles.

World of Warcraft Mists of Panderia provides exciting content for both beginning and established players. Players who enjoyed group questing may be disappointed at the expansions reliance on single-player quest chains and world phasing. Players will enjoy the changes that further evolves the game and keeps content feeling fresh after eight years.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-05-29

kandoo

Super Gamer Dude

6.30

Ben 10 Omniverse is a classic example of a game that relies on a TV fan-base to be successful. Keeping in mind that the game is obviously targeted at boys aged six to ten, it succeeds on a few levels and fails at others.

The game does a good job at remaking the story elements and characters from the show. Players will play as young boy hero Ben, who has the power to temporarily transform himself into various alien creatures using a device called the Omnitrix. The game successfully uses this mechanic to add a layer of strategic depth to the game. Players will need to consistently use the Omnitrix power to win, and they will need to choose the correct alien form for any given scenario. There are multiple simple puzzles that will require the use of specific forms to overcome. There's nothing overly challenging, but considering the target demographic, simple is probably best.

The combat itself has very little depth. With some exception, combat revolves around mashing the attack button in order to stack as many attacks together as possible for maximum damage. There are some combos, and different alien forms have different attacks, but the basics are always the same. One serious lacking, considering the game's platform, is that it makes very little use of the Wii's motion functionality. All of the game's controls could easily be rolled into a standard Xbox or PS3 controller. While the game is available across consoles, its target demographic is most likely to have a Wii, and thus it would be nice to see more Wii-specific functionality. The control format, however, is easy to use and readily accessible, even to less-experienced players. The Omnitrix tool is a bit clunky at first, but not overly difficult to master.

Where the game really shines is in dialogue and characterization, which is taken right out of the cartoon. Many of the lines are actually quite humorous and would be downright hilarious to the target audience. Players will immediately recognize the voice and personality of their favorite characters from the show. The dialogue is also delivered in a classic text and voice-over format, so young gamers can read along as they play. This inclusion of text is a major plus for any children's game.

Graphics quality for the game is understandably cartoon-looking, but this is acceptable because it fits the cartoon quality of the original show. Level design and appearance is nothing spectacular, but it isn't something that hurts the game overall.

Repetition is what kills Ben 10 Omniverse. Targeting a young player demographic should be no excuse for simplified gameplay. The entire game consists of basically traveling to various locations and beating up on various alien or robotic enemies over and over again. There is low replay value and the multiplayer options are limited.

All in all, Ben 10 Omniverse is an okay game that will appeal to fans of the series and probably no one else. The dialogue is fitting, humorous and memorable, but intensely repetitive gameplay and lack of strategic depth will limit the game's overarching popularity.

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Posted:
2013-05-29

kandoo

Super Gamer Dude

8.20

Many gamers out there like to play shoot and kill games with nothing much going for it in terms of plot or depth of characters. With Nightfall Mysteries Asylum Conspiracy, this is a game where you have to be determined to complete the game or risk the chance of not sleeping anyways.

The plot is on a remote island where an asylum is said to be located. Grandpa Charles was last seen on the island and you are determined to find out where he is while having to experience the mystery and suspense of the search.

When you get to the island, you find yourself looking at an abandoned hospital which curiously holds a big population consisting of ranting and raving patients who may or may not know about your grandfather; then there is that brother and sister who seem familiar to you and yet you can't quite place from where you knew them from; there is even a police officer who is investigating the mystery surrounding the death of his wife. Add on the mysterious doctor who is too good to be true and is as sleazy as can be. You need to figure out how to put all of these people together to find out where your grandfather was last seen and his relationship with the mysterious lot.

Nightfall Mysteries Asylum Conspiracy was obviously well throughout as a game of puzzle, mystery, and suspense. You, as the grandson, will go through the hospital and experience the horrors and mysteries which you need to uncover and pick up bits and pieces of items that can help you find your grandfather. The game is a little short, but the suspense more than makes up for the lack of time.

There are so many tasks you need to accomplish before you can even enter the hospital like getting an ID (whatever for? It is abandoned supposedly), and you need to guess a password to get in. then there is the demon door which you need to get through. It can be quite annoying and frustrating at times, but it just adds on to the appeal of the game. You may have to make use of your notebook a lot through the game for this will hold the hints that will help you complete the game levels, one by one.

For gamers who like mystery, suspense and horror, Nightfall Mysteries Asylum Conspiracy is a wonderful game to add to the collection. It hits the nerves directly which just antes up the suspense and the determination of the player to continue and complete the game levels. The only downside is that the game is a little short for my taste, but it can be lengthy for the yellow blooded. This is the perfect experience for those who love mystery games and sweat out fear in the process. Good One!

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Posted:
2013-05-29

kandoo

Super Gamer Dude

8.60

Star Wars: Empire at War is a strategy game that can poses real challenges to the gamer. The battles are just as epic as in the books and movies, the sound effects are just what you would expect, the play styles of Rebellion and Empire are effectively contrasted, and the many heroes involved in Rebellion and Empire serve well for the gameplay. There is a downside though, the land battles are not as exciting, and they can get repetitive. Nevertheless, it's all good. Star Wars was known more for the space battles, not those made on land.

For the record, I am a Star Wars fanatic, have been since I first saw it way back when I was only 11 years. Yes, I saw the original, untouched version of Star Wars and found myself in the movie house no less than 10 times. Through the years I have seen attempts to make the franchise a computer game and they did not catch my attention until Star Wars: Empire at War. To date, this is the best that has ever been developed and it is a relief that it was.

The action takes place on land and in outer space. The Rebellion game play is different from that of the Empire gameplay so that was a relief as well. I do not know how I would have reacted if the developers did not make it so. The strategy game is well developed and even for those not familiar with the story line can still go through the game and find it exciting and challenging.

The action is set to real time so this means that the action taking place in the Empire will happen at the same time as that of the Rebellion. There are maps to show the planets giving the player the options to use their space ports and it can also show the defense systems on the land as well as those structures which can be used by the alliance.

The gamers have to be on the lookout for those planets that offer little bit of extra in terms of economics and power. The costs would have to be spent using credits but these cannot just be used haphazardly. There are rules to follow, policies that need to be respected before any costs can be paid up.

The downside, as mentioned previously, involved the land battles. They do not look as exciting and as much fun as the space battles are, but that is just to be expected. Even the books and movies dwelt more on space battles rather than those on land. Controlling the attack forces on land, from out in space, can also be a bit tricky and would involve a lot of strategy. Then there are times when the tasks can be a bit repetitive, but then nothing is perfect.

In the end, Star Wars Empire at War truly delivers the Rebellion and Empire wars that fans of all ages expect from the popular franchise. It is well developed, fun, exciting, and challenging. Truly, the presentation alone won my heart. My recommendation: buy it, it is worth the money, and the time spent playing.

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Posted:
2013-05-29

kandoo

Super Gamer Dude

6.90

The game will take you back to the days when television was all game-shows and situational comedy, and the word reality hadn’t even been thought up yet. It features your standard TV game show host, a shapely model of a co-host, and up to four contestants going wild on stage. After a question is answered, players have to select from the multiple choices available for the correct answer. Since there are multiple people playing, you also have to select the correct answer the fastest, since that is what gets the most points. If you select the correct answer after someone else has, you’ll get less points, but at least you’ll be right. That’s just one of the ways this game balances out trivia knowledge.

In addition to being able to ride on your friends’ answers, there is also an option after every round called the wheel of chance. If anyone that is playing decides that they want to use the wheel then everyone has to use the wheel. This can really slow down the game, since spinning the wheel can either increase the amount of money you have, or can make you lose everything. Generally, anyone who is behind the leader is going to want to spin the wheel each round, leading to a game that is more based on luck than on any amount of trivia knowledge.

There is also the fact that later on in the game, there are little sub-games that will hide one, or more, of the answers. Through such methods as directing a looking glass onto the screen to show what the answers are, to scratching off answers like a lotto ticket, this other method of balancing out the game turn’s trivia knowledge into less of a weapon in the game, and more of a hindrance.

On the bright side, there is extensive Mii support in the game, so your character will be able to stand in and play for you on the show. The expressions that are provided are also very expressive. This game does an excellent job of getting your Mii to react like they would, and it’s very entertaining to watch. Another positive thing about the game is that there are a ton of TV trivia questions in it, allowing people to play for hours and hours before the questions start repeating.

While the problems with TV Show King don’t make it unplayable, the do make it less of a party trivia game, and more of a group video game, but there’s still a lot of party-aspect to it, enough that it’ll likely keep you and your friends and family enjoying it for a night, at least.

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Posted:
2013-05-29

kandoo

Super Gamer Dude

7.10

F.E.A.R. was a great example of a fantastic first shooter game. The fear factor was high in the previous game which lent a thrilling chill when shooting the enemies. This fear factor was much in demand and a lot of the fans wanted more. Not to disappoint, the developers, Sierra, increase the fear in F.E.A.R.

There is really no need to feel that you have to play the older version, F.E.A.R. Files can stand on its own. It is merely an extension of the older version, yes, but the atmosphere which surrounds the game is anted up.

There is an Extraction Point where the gamer returns as the point man from the original game and this is where the action immediately picks up. The climactic ending of the previous game becomes the beginning of Files and once again, the gamer is in the middle of Auburn City, once again surrounded by clone soldiers and some ghostly phenomena. However, instead of trying to get to the bottom of the whole thing, the gamer simply tries to battle out of the city. Extraction Point is getting out and this is exactly what the gamer is trying to do. There is a lot of running, a lot of shooting and a lot of F.E.A.R.

Files has a new character, this is true, but this really does not matter, there is enough action to point the gamer out of the city. Unfortunately, Perseus Mandate is really ugly in this version which makes the whole look of the game disappointing.

The single player campaign is not the only mode to play. There is also the instant action mode which allows the gamer to battle computer controlled enemies. The plot remains the same, the gamer has to find the first exit out of that city, safely.

There is a multiplayer option which can offer the gamer basically the same things found in the previous version. The downside is that there are not a lot of players online for the multiplayer option. Somehow, this is one option which is not very popular. This means that the single player mode rules in Files.

In conclusion, F.E.A.R. Files is a solid game which clearly satisfies the need for more atmospheric games in the fans that had first experienced it in the original game. For those who have never played this before, it really does not matter which game is played, they both rock. However, from this gamers’ point of view, it would be best to go through the first game and then onto Files. This way, the player can experience the full gamut of fear which only F.E.A.R. Files can deliver. Is this game recommended? Yes, for those who love single player modes. However, I hesitate to recommend this for the multiplayer fans because of the lack of members in the online community.

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Posted:
2013-05-29

kandoo

Super Gamer Dude

5.80

The story of the game has to do with the continent of North America being split down the middle between the Pacificians and the Atlantic Alliance. The West Coast ended up choosing to allow DNA alteration, while the East Coast banned genetic engineering and chose the route of cybernetics instead. When the Pacificians can't take the ban on genetic engineering any more, they secede, and the Atlantic Alliance sends you, Jet Brody, to bring back the renegade general leading the separation.

This third-person shooter plays very similar to other games of its sort. When you take cover, your health regenerates. You get to shoot machine guns, rocket launchers, sniper rifles, and other implements of distant death. You get to drive around on an All Terrain Vehicle in between shooting at foes. One thing that is different about this game, however, is that you are able to terraform the ground with your guns and grenades. You can use this feature to move the terrain up, or down. This is used in the game to help complete a couple of traps, and to find hidden items throughout the levels, and in a couple places to kill enemies, but that's it. Generally, too, the game points out any opportunity to use the skill to take out targets, so there goes your chance to feel like you pulled off a sweet move with it. While it's an interesting feature to check out, it doesn't really add a lot to the gameplay.

That's too bad, too, because the gameplay could use a little adding to. It mostly consists of fighting off the enormous number of enemies that the game throws at you. Spending time fighting through the same section over and over again to reach another save point would be the most rewarding part of the whole experience, except that you end up doing it again in the very next section. That makes the yellow goo that comes along with each head shot the most rewarding part of the game.

The visuals in the game definitely make a person feel like they are a couple hundred years in the future, if that future became very drab. Most of the levels are filled with grays and browns, making a person wonder if the if they had outlawed color in the future along with genetic engineering.

While the Fracture experience isn't a completely unpleasant one to take on, it had its annoyances. The fights are difficult, sometimes overwhelmingly so, and the tool that the game gives you to help deal with them, doesn't do much for you tactically. What you're left with is a game that you could slog through the muck and fight for but probably won't.

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Posted:
2013-12-05

kandoo

Super Gamer Dude

7.50

Watch Dogs is an open world action/adventure action game from the same makers as the successful Sleeping Dogs, Ubisoft Montreal, and published by Ubisoft.

Players take the part of an Irish vigilante character named Aiden Pierce living in a stylized version of Chicago. Aiden has the knowledge and expertise to regularly hack into the government's CtOS, otherwise known as the City's Central Operating System, a system that runs every technical aspect of the entire city. His knowledge gives Aiden the power to hack everything from bank accounts, public and private records and smartphones to traffic lights and street cameras. Aiden must use this technical know how and everything else he can in a mission to assassinate a media mogul named Joseph DeMarco, who has been acquitted of charges of a murder which he in fact committed.

Watch Dogs allows players access to an open world where they can free roam around many areas. They can use the central operating system to cause traffic jams or even major car collisions or other disruption as a distraction from his real mission. Players can make useful being able to hack into the system to avoid being located by the authorities. The city is literally under the player's control at any given time during the game.

Watch Dogs offers more than just computer hacking and hijacking technology, even though that is the main point of the game. Players can enjoy taking care of business in the city their own way. Players have access to many different weapons, super fast cars, and powerful computers.

In the online multiplayer mode, game players also have the challenge of finding hidden characters that they didn't realize were in the game, which works by one player secretly taking the place of another player or steal another's identity, without the second player realizing. Things can get a little complicated. When online, players will be able to hack into other player's information and use that to their advantage. They can go around the game committing crimes and causing problems without drawing attention to their own character.

With such a novel technological emphasis and amazing game play, players may be left wondering if the game is lacking anywhere else. The answer to that question is no, Ubisoft has worked hard to make sure all of the graphics are of amazing quality. They have continually pushed back the release date so they can make sure Watch Dogs is completely ready with no issues before it was publicly released. It is released for most systems including the PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, and the Wii U.

Watch Dogs has beautiful, stunning views along with great story lines. After playing Sleeping Dogs and comparing it to this game, I found it every bit as good and I can say with confidence that Watch Dogs will be a new best selling game.

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Posted:
2014-02-02

kandoo

Super Gamer Dude

6.30

Ben 10 Omniverse is a classic example of a game that relies on a TV fan-base to be successful. Keeping in mind that the game is obviously targeted at boys aged six to ten, it succeeds on a few levels and fails at others.

The game does a good job at remaking the story elements and characters from the show. Players will play as young boy hero Ben, who has the power to temporarily transform himself into various alien creatures using a device called the Omnitrix. The game successfully uses this mechanic to add a layer of strategic depth to the game. Players will need to consistently use the Omnitrix power to win, and they will need to choose the correct alien form for any given scenario. There are multiple simple puzzles that will require the use of specific forms to overcome. There's nothing overly challenging, but considering the target demographic, simple is probably best.

The combat itself has very little depth. With some exception, combat revolves around mashing the attack button in order to stack as many attacks together as possible for maximum damage. There are some combos, and different alien forms have different attacks, but the basics are always the same. One serious lacking, considering the game's platform, is that it makes very little use of the Wii's motion functionality. All of the game's controls could easily be rolled into a standard Xbox or PS3 controller. While the game is available across consoles, its target demographic is most likely to have a Wii, and thus it would be nice to see more Wii-specific functionality. The control format, however, is easy to use and readily accessible, even to less-experienced players. The Omnitrix tool is a bit clunky at first, but not overly difficult to master.

Where the game really shines is in dialogue and characterization, which is taken right out of the cartoon. Many of the lines are actually quite humorous and would be downright hilarious to the target audience. Players will immediately recognize the voice and personality of their favorite characters from the show. The dialogue is also delivered in a classic text and voice-over format, so young gamers can read along as they play. This inclusion of text is a major plus for any children's game.

Graphics quality for the game is understandably cartoon-looking, but this is acceptable because it fits the cartoon quality of the original show. Level design and appearance is nothing spectacular, but it isn't something that hurts the game overall.

Repetition is what kills Ben 10 Omniverse. Targeting a young player demographic should be no excuse for simplified gameplay. The entire game consists of basically traveling to various locations and beating up on various alien or robotic enemies over and over again. There is low replay value and the multiplayer options are limited.

All in all, Ben 10 Omniverse is an okay game that will appeal to fans of the series and probably no one else. The dialogue is fitting, humorous and memorable, but intensely repetitive gameplay and lack of strategic depth will limit the game's overarching popularity.


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