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Posted:
2013-08-15

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

7.6

007 Legends for the Xbox 360 enables Daniel Craig to take on various assignments from the pick of the Bond Films, leaving out a few titles such as Die Another Day and Moonraker which are generally considered the least favorite of the ever popular series. The game takes the best elements or sections of these top Bond films and allows the player to replicate the action in a gaming environment.

The gameplay in 007 Legends could be compared to the previous title Goldeneye Reloaded, and the graphics are almost identical in quality. The interaction with players will not overwhelm you, but if you are an avid bond fan there is much to be played and enjoyed here. However this time round, they have improved on the awful combat controls and weapon aiming which plagued the last title, making this so much more engaging than the previous encounter with the Bond series.

During the campaign missions you have the ability to upgrade the Bond character as well as an extensive array of weapons which can be obtained during gameplay and which can also be updated as the missions progress. I suppose you have to ask yourself are you a Bond fan, if you are then this title may live up to your expectations, there are some pretty cool missions with scenes such as the one with the snowmobiles in which there are intense firefights as you ski down the mountain being pursued by them, and the Fort Knox battle in Goldfinger where the battle against wave after wave of enemies takes place.

There is also a multiplayer option in 007 Legends which has various modes of play, one example would be the Legends mode, and this mode allows gamers to take on the role of various bond characters which each have unique weapons at there disposal. I suppose in the end there are only so many which can be played before repetition sets in and the overall experience in this mode online becomes limited. There are other modes online which are more befitting.

Granted it may not have the overall intense graphics of various rival games, but I feel that with this new Bond title we see elements of Bond coming back to true form, as originally seen in such classic Bond titles such as The Man with the Golden Gun.

Those that enjoy Bond in general will be able to forgive the slight glitches and occasional sound issues which sometimes appear during heavy combat. Overall a much improved Bond experience.

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Posted:
2014-11-12

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Don't play The Walking Dead: Season 2 if you haven't played the original. The best part of the game is how a character in the original series grows and evolves into a fully realized, three dimensional protagonist worthy of the time you'll invest in each of the five episodes. If you haven't seen where girl protagonist Clementine comes from, this second season's greatest strength will be significantly diluted for you.

Well that's not to say nothing else has improved. Whereas the first season asked us to believe that if we shook its hand, it would take us on a journey where our choices mattered, all it did was deliver an electric shock. This time choices actually do have a rather sizable impact on the conclusion of certain story lines. Elsewhere, the graphics are a little nicer in that the characters look less like they're made of polygons and the trees resemble something more like real trees. That's about it.

There are still technical issues that Telltale seems to refuse to address. On PC, sometimes bizarre glitches will impede progress. Even on more stable consoles, there are intermittent graphics issues. They've put out 10 episodes now and one additional bonus story, as well other games on the same engine. It's high time they fixed these issues that detract from the experience.

What do you do in The Walking Dead: Season 2? Well, you start out alone trying to survive in a zombie wilderness in a promising first chapter, which is a great deal more original and has writing that is much more constructive to establishing a heart of its own. Then you join with the usual cliched crew of survivors in the second episode. It all goes tumbling downhill when a mad mastermind of Ye Olde Safeguard Against Zombie Horde clearly inspired by the series' Governor character appears. From then on, it's a matter of Choose Your Own Zombie Cliche.

The problem is that Telltale isn't as good as this kind of thing as you might imagine from the praise the series has gotten. Telltale used to make games based on comedy properties: old point and click adventures like Sam & Max and Monkey Island, or animation and movies that depended on funny, memorable properties like Strong Bad, Back to the Future or Wallace & Gromit. The Walking Dead owes just as much of its interface to the tradition of those old adventures games where you select icons to look, talk, use or interact with objects and people, but it's really in the style of Japanese visual novel games which have you pick choices from available options at plot junctures. More importantly, because these are not comedy characters who build their identities through the standard point and click style of comical dialogue responses to clicking on the environment, the characters in Walking Dead: Season 2 come off as flat.

This was not as much a problem in the first season, because Telltale was largely plagiarizing in that one. Without an extremely inspired and masterful zombie novel behind it -- The Road is perhaps the best of its kind in written fiction -- Season 2 flounders. It can't fall back on the cultural ties a bond between an adult protecting a child can bring to a story. While not as manipulative in the same way, you can see the Telltale writers working hard from their Scriptwriting 101 classes to make you feel for characters by forcing contrived expository dialogue down their throats.

Dear Telltale, please observe that there are thousands of ways people get to know each other and form bonds that can cause emotional strife in a story. Picking and choosing from the most obvious exposition devices possible in order to let players choose who they save and who they let die is just as manipulative as exploiting the natural tendency to want to protect children in the first game.

In the end, just like one might read a romance novel for the heartbreak and passion of the inevitable hookup, or a fantasy novel for the creativity of its lore and world, The Walking Dead: Season 2 is best left as a curio for those who really love their apocalyptic fiction.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-12

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Don't play The Walking Dead: Season 2 if you haven't played the original. The best part of the game is how a character in the original series grows and evolves into a fully realized, three dimensional protagonist worthy of the time you'll invest in each of the five episodes. If you haven't seen where girl protagonist Clementine comes from, this second season's greatest strength will be significantly diluted for you.

Well that's not to say nothing else has improved. Whereas the first season asked us to believe that if we shook its hand, it would take us on a journey where our choices mattered, all it did was deliver an electric shock. This time choices actually do have a rather sizable impact on the conclusion of certain story lines. Elsewhere, the graphics are a little nicer in that the characters look less like they're made of polygons and the trees resemble something more like real trees. That's about it.

There are still technical issues that Telltale seems to refuse to address. On PC, sometimes bizarre glitches will impede progress. Even on more stable consoles, there are intermittent graphics issues. They've put out 10 episodes now and one additional bonus story, as well other games on the same engine. It's high time they fixed these issues that detract from the experience.

What do you do in The Walking Dead: Season 2? Well, you start out alone trying to survive in a zombie wilderness in a promising first chapter, which is a great deal more original and has writing that is much more constructive to establishing a heart of its own. Then you join with the usual cliched crew of survivors in the second episode. It all goes tumbling downhill when a mad mastermind of Ye Olde Safeguard Against Zombie Horde clearly inspired by the series' Governor character appears. From then on, it's a matter of Choose Your Own Zombie Cliche.

The problem is that Telltale isn't as good as this kind of thing as you might imagine from the praise the series has gotten. Telltale used to make games based on comedy properties: old point and click adventures like Sam & Max and Monkey Island, or animation and movies that depended on funny, memorable properties like Strong Bad, Back to the Future or Wallace & Gromit. The Walking Dead owes just as much of its interface to the tradition of those old adventures games where you select icons to look, talk, use or interact with objects and people, but it's really in the style of Japanese visual novel games which have you pick choices from available options at plot junctures. More importantly, because these are not comedy characters who build their identities through the standard point and click style of comical dialogue responses to clicking on the environment, the characters in Walking Dead: Season 2 come off as flat.

This was not as much a problem in the first season, because Telltale was largely plagiarizing in that one. Without an extremely inspired and masterful zombie novel behind it -- The Road is perhaps the best of its kind in written fiction -- Season 2 flounders. It can't fall back on the cultural ties a bond between an adult protecting a child can bring to a story. While not as manipulative in the same way, you can see the Telltale writers working hard from their Scriptwriting 101 classes to make you feel for characters by forcing contrived expository dialogue down their throats.

Dear Telltale, please observe that there are thousands of ways people get to know each other and form bonds that can cause emotional strife in a story. Picking and choosing from the most obvious exposition devices possible in order to let players choose who they save and who they let die is just as manipulative as exploiting the natural tendency to want to protect children in the first game.

In the end, just like one might read a romance novel for the heartbreak and passion of the inevitable hookup, or a fantasy novel for the creativity of its lore and world, The Walking Dead: Season 2 is best left as a curio for those who really love their apocalyptic fiction.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-12

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Don't play The Walking Dead: Season 2 if you haven't played the original. The best part of the game is how a character in the original series grows and evolves into a fully realized, three dimensional protagonist worthy of the time you'll invest in each of the five episodes. If you haven't seen where girl protagonist Clementine comes from, this second season's greatest strength will be significantly diluted for you.

Well that's not to say nothing else has improved. Whereas the first season asked us to believe that if we shook its hand, it would take us on a journey where our choices mattered, all it did was deliver an electric shock. This time choices actually do have a rather sizable impact on the conclusion of certain story lines. Elsewhere, the graphics are a little nicer in that the characters look less like they're made of polygons and the trees resemble something more like real trees. That's about it.

There are still technical issues that Telltale seems to refuse to address. On PC, sometimes bizarre glitches will impede progress. Even on more stable consoles, there are intermittent graphics issues. They've put out 10 episodes now and one additional bonus story, as well other games on the same engine. It's high time they fixed these issues that detract from the experience.

What do you do in The Walking Dead: Season 2? Well, you start out alone trying to survive in a zombie wilderness in a promising first chapter, which is a great deal more original and has writing that is much more constructive to establishing a heart of its own. Then you join with the usual cliched crew of survivors in the second episode. It all goes tumbling downhill when a mad mastermind of Ye Olde Safeguard Against Zombie Horde clearly inspired by the series' Governor character appears. From then on, it's a matter of Choose Your Own Zombie Cliche.

The problem is that Telltale isn't as good as this kind of thing as you might imagine from the praise the series has gotten. Telltale used to make games based on comedy properties: old point and click adventures like Sam & Max and Monkey Island, or animation and movies that depended on funny, memorable properties like Strong Bad, Back to the Future or Wallace & Gromit. The Walking Dead owes just as much of its interface to the tradition of those old adventures games where you select icons to look, talk, use or interact with objects and people, but it's really in the style of Japanese visual novel games which have you pick choices from available options at plot junctures. More importantly, because these are not comedy characters who build their identities through the standard point and click style of comical dialogue responses to clicking on the environment, the characters in Walking Dead: Season 2 come off as flat.

This was not as much a problem in the first season, because Telltale was largely plagiarizing in that one. Without an extremely inspired and masterful zombie novel behind it -- The Road is perhaps the best of its kind in written fiction -- Season 2 flounders. It can't fall back on the cultural ties a bond between an adult protecting a child can bring to a story. While not as manipulative in the same way, you can see the Telltale writers working hard from their Scriptwriting 101 classes to make you feel for characters by forcing contrived expository dialogue down their throats.

Dear Telltale, please observe that there are thousands of ways people get to know each other and form bonds that can cause emotional strife in a story. Picking and choosing from the most obvious exposition devices possible in order to let players choose who they save and who they let die is just as manipulative as exploiting the natural tendency to want to protect children in the first game.

In the end, just like one might read a romance novel for the heartbreak and passion of the inevitable hookup, or a fantasy novel for the creativity of its lore and world, The Walking Dead: Season 2 is best left as a curio for those who really love their apocalyptic fiction.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-12

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Don't play The Walking Dead: Season 2 if you haven't played the original. The best part of the game is how a character in the original series grows and evolves into a fully realized, three dimensional protagonist worthy of the time you'll invest in each of the five episodes. If you haven't seen where girl protagonist Clementine comes from, this second season's greatest strength will be significantly diluted for you.

Well that's not to say nothing else has improved. Whereas the first season asked us to believe that if we shook its hand, it would take us on a journey where our choices mattered, all it did was deliver an electric shock. This time choices actually do have a rather sizable impact on the conclusion of certain story lines. Elsewhere, the graphics are a little nicer in that the characters look less like they're made of polygons and the trees resemble something more like real trees. That's about it.

There are still technical issues that Telltale seems to refuse to address. On PC, sometimes bizarre glitches will impede progress. Even on more stable consoles, there are intermittent graphics issues. They've put out 10 episodes now and one additional bonus story, as well other games on the same engine. It's high time they fixed these issues that detract from the experience.

What do you do in The Walking Dead: Season 2? Well, you start out alone trying to survive in a zombie wilderness in a promising first chapter, which is a great deal more original and has writing that is much more constructive to establishing a heart of its own. Then you join with the usual cliched crew of survivors in the second episode. It all goes tumbling downhill when a mad mastermind of Ye Olde Safeguard Against Zombie Horde clearly inspired by the series' Governor character appears. From then on, it's a matter of Choose Your Own Zombie Cliche.

The problem is that Telltale isn't as good as this kind of thing as you might imagine from the praise the series has gotten. Telltale used to make games based on comedy properties: old point and click adventures like Sam & Max and Monkey Island, or animation and movies that depended on funny, memorable properties like Strong Bad, Back to the Future or Wallace & Gromit. The Walking Dead owes just as much of its interface to the tradition of those old adventures games where you select icons to look, talk, use or interact with objects and people, but it's really in the style of Japanese visual novel games which have you pick choices from available options at plot junctures. More importantly, because these are not comedy characters who build their identities through the standard point and click style of comical dialogue responses to clicking on the environment, the characters in Walking Dead: Season 2 come off as flat.

This was not as much a problem in the first season, because Telltale was largely plagiarizing in that one. Without an extremely inspired and masterful zombie novel behind it -- The Road is perhaps the best of its kind in written fiction -- Season 2 flounders. It can't fall back on the cultural ties a bond between an adult protecting a child can bring to a story. While not as manipulative in the same way, you can see the Telltale writers working hard from their Scriptwriting 101 classes to make you feel for characters by forcing contrived expository dialogue down their throats.

Dear Telltale, please observe that there are thousands of ways people get to know each other and form bonds that can cause emotional strife in a story. Picking and choosing from the most obvious exposition devices possible in order to let players choose who they save and who they let die is just as manipulative as exploiting the natural tendency to want to protect children in the first game.

In the end, just like one might read a romance novel for the heartbreak and passion of the inevitable hookup, or a fantasy novel for the creativity of its lore and world, The Walking Dead: Season 2 is best left as a curio for those who really love their apocalyptic fiction.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-12

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Don't play The Walking Dead: Season 2 if you haven't played the original. The best part of the game is how a character in the original series grows and evolves into a fully realized, three dimensional protagonist worthy of the time you'll invest in each of the five episodes. If you haven't seen where girl protagonist Clementine comes from, this second season's greatest strength will be significantly diluted for you.

Well that's not to say nothing else has improved. Whereas the first season asked us to believe that if we shook its hand, it would take us on a journey where our choices mattered, all it did was deliver an electric shock. This time choices actually do have a rather sizable impact on the conclusion of certain story lines. Elsewhere, the graphics are a little nicer in that the characters look less like they're made of polygons and the trees resemble something more like real trees. That's about it.

There are still technical issues that Telltale seems to refuse to address. On PC, sometimes bizarre glitches will impede progress. Even on more stable consoles, there are intermittent graphics issues. They've put out 10 episodes now and one additional bonus story, as well other games on the same engine. It's high time they fixed these issues that detract from the experience.

What do you do in The Walking Dead: Season 2? Well, you start out alone trying to survive in a zombie wilderness in a promising first chapter, which is a great deal more original and has writing that is much more constructive to establishing a heart of its own. Then you join with the usual cliched crew of survivors in the second episode. It all goes tumbling downhill when a mad mastermind of Ye Olde Safeguard Against Zombie Horde clearly inspired by the series' Governor character appears. From then on, it's a matter of Choose Your Own Zombie Cliche.

The problem is that Telltale isn't as good as this kind of thing as you might imagine from the praise the series has gotten. Telltale used to make games based on comedy properties: old point and click adventures like Sam & Max and Monkey Island, or animation and movies that depended on funny, memorable properties like Strong Bad, Back to the Future or Wallace & Gromit. The Walking Dead owes just as much of its interface to the tradition of those old adventures games where you select icons to look, talk, use or interact with objects and people, but it's really in the style of Japanese visual novel games which have you pick choices from available options at plot junctures. More importantly, because these are not comedy characters who build their identities through the standard point and click style of comical dialogue responses to clicking on the environment, the characters in Walking Dead: Season 2 come off as flat.

This was not as much a problem in the first season, because Telltale was largely plagiarizing in that one. Without an extremely inspired and masterful zombie novel behind it -- The Road is perhaps the best of its kind in written fiction -- Season 2 flounders. It can't fall back on the cultural ties a bond between an adult protecting a child can bring to a story. While not as manipulative in the same way, you can see the Telltale writers working hard from their Scriptwriting 101 classes to make you feel for characters by forcing contrived expository dialogue down their throats.

Dear Telltale, please observe that there are thousands of ways people get to know each other and form bonds that can cause emotional strife in a story. Picking and choosing from the most obvious exposition devices possible in order to let players choose who they save and who they let die is just as manipulative as exploiting the natural tendency to want to protect children in the first game.

In the end, just like one might read a romance novel for the heartbreak and passion of the inevitable hookup, or a fantasy novel for the creativity of its lore and world, The Walking Dead: Season 2 is best left as a curio for those who really love their apocalyptic fiction.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-03

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

7.1

A criticism leveled at Rock Band and Guitar Hero is that it is just a toy that doesn't actually teach you anything. Many people, particularly musicians, take the stance that the time you spent getting good at a rhythm game could have been spent learning how to play a real instrument.

Well now we have the best of both worlds with a game that teaches you how to play the guitar. Rocksmith Guitar Bundle for the Xbox 360 comes with a USB adapter that will work with any regular guitar, and provides an environment full of amps and effects that function to let you enjoy yourself while you slowly learn how to play your guitar over time.

For people that have never touched a guitar before, the game starts about as basic as you can get. The first thing that Rocksmith will teach you the first time you boot it up is the proper way to hold your guitar, and then moves into how to pluck and tune the strings. For people who have decided to upgrade from a more traditional rhythm game, the developers of Rocksmith have included the highway of notes that scroll by the screen at a rapid pace, although this time they are actual notes.

Most people usually give up on learning Guitar because they are just playing boring songs they don't really recognize. Rocksmith has intelligently managed to completely dodge this problem by very quickly moving from basic lessons on how to make noises come out of the guitar into very basic riffs from popular songs. This keeps new students engaged while at the same time trying to give more seasoned guitar veterans a reason to buy the game.

Sadly, it is with this audience that Rocksmith completely falls flat. The game takes forever to ramp up to the higher level lessons and more difficult songs, and there are no options for people who already know the basics of guitar playing to skip any of the basics, which will often lead to them becoming frustrated. Because of this, the only people who should really be considering Rocksmith are those people who want to learn guitar but have never started doing so.

Beyond the basic learning modes, Rocksmith also features a number of videos that show the concepts that are being taught in-game in a very simple manner that make it far more personal and easy to understand. It also features something that it calls the "Guitarcade", which has mini games that often end up feeling like someone took the basic idea behind Typing of the Dead and shoved it into a guitar game.

Rocksmith Guitar Bundle certainly is not for everyone. It requires a desire to learn that not all people have, and its certainly not enough of a "game" to play for fun, but for the price it makes a fantastic training tool for people that are new to playing guitar, and it's a lot cheaper than a real person.

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Posted:
2014-03-29

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

7.1

Since the original LEGO Star Wars was released to critical acclaim and commercial success, Traveller's Tales has slowly been slowly making games out of practically every license that LEGO has the rights to, from Harry Potter to Batman. As time has gone on, they have struggled to keep the style of games fresh, even though the games continue to sell very well. Their latest title brings a new franchise into the fold with LEGO Lord of the Rings, and they have tried once again to redesign their games, but does LEGO Lord of the Rings manage to succeed?

The game borrows heavily from Traveller's Tales most recent title, LEGO Batman 2, incorporating both the somewhat open world and the fact that the characters talk instead of just emote using noises like older LEGO games. LEGO Lord of the Rings puts its own twist on the voices, simply pulling the voices directly from the Lord of the Rings films and placing them in the game. This effect works far better than I could have ever expected by using the contrast between the exaggerated LEGO animations and the real-life voices for comedic effect.

When it comes to the world LEGO Lord of the Rings takes place in, every setting feels like you would expect it to if you are a Lord of the Rings fan, while managing to add that comedic tinge to the world that Traveller's Tales is so well known for.

The semi-open world that the game makes use of is certainly functional, but isn't really all that interesting. the side missions manage to push the number of things to do in the game beyond the level that I am willing to deal with in something that is so simple to start with. I certainly appreciate the developer's constant attempts to improve LEGO games, but I worry that at some point they are losing what truly makes these games unique and interesting.

If you have played any PC version of a LEGO game recently, you pretty much know what to expect when it comes to LEGO Lord of the Rings. The port is certainly serviceable, and the game looks great in higher resolutions, but it also lacks many graphical settings that you would expect from any PC game on the market today. In addition, the default keyboard controls are difficult to use, more or less requiring a controller to play the game properly.

If you have kids that love the LEGO games and Lord of the Rings, this game is a no brainer for co-operative play. If you're just a single guy that likes Lord of the Rings and LEGO, this game becomes much harder to recommend. The game itself is funny and quite entertaining, but the game feels like it was designed in its entirety for two people to play together. If you can suffer through those parts, there's something to be had here as long as you know exactly what it is that you are getting yourself into.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-01-15

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

8.5

These days, you never know what to expect from Sonic. Sega's flagship mascot of the 90's, Sonic was known for some of the best games of the 16 bit generation. Something happened when everyone moved to 3D though. Sonic's past 3D adventures have been plagued by bad controls, a poor camera and oh dear God, those awful soundtracks.

With that said, the guy in blue has been making a comeback. Sonic the Hedgehog 4 was released through DLC to much praise and even Sonic All-Star Racing wasn't half bad. Will Sega keep their Blue Blazer heading in the right direction with Sonic Colors?

The answer is an unequivocal yes. Sonic Colors is what fans have been waiting for. A Sonic game with 3D elements that feels modern and most importantly, fun.

Sonic has never had much of a storyline and that's the case here. Dr. Robotnik/Eggman has created an amusement park in outer space where he is enslaving alien beings called Wisps. He essentially managed to take over the entire planet. Sonic, naturally, gets wind of this and speeds to the rescue.

All of the levels you would expect in a Sonic game are here. The grassy open plain, the casino, etc. The planet lends itself easily to creating all kinds of different environments for Sonic to zip around in.

The graphics are in a word, breathtaking. You might have trouble enjoying the view though as you watch Sonic fly through levels at a blazing 60 frames per second. But you should top to take a gander, the textures are crisp and high resolution.

The gameplay itself is a nod to what made Sonic successful in the past. I said this game has 3D elements, and it does, but most of the game takes place in a 2D-esque track that Sonic stays locked on to. The camera sometimes switches out to a 3D view but then right back in on the track. This essentially solves all of the problems Sonic games have had with their 3D levels in the past. It's not all about just holding forward and jumping though. Sonic Colors features alternate paths you can take and a lot of Wisps that need to be saved and/or collected throughout the levels.

One of the only negatives about Sonic Colors is that the end game is merciless. The ramp up in difficulty as you near the final boss is just brutal. There are areas where you can go several minutes of play without a checkpoint. This seems to artificially inflate the length of the game as you will no doubt die and have to play those same couple of minutes over and over again.

The game's co op mode is also not a lot of fun. There's just too much speed and not enough screen space and you can easily kill your partner accidentally.

All in all though, Sonic Colors is a good game that is a huge improvement over Sega's previous Sonic titles for this generation.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-01-31

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

7.6

007 Legends for the PS3 enables Daniel Craig to take on various assignments from the pick of the Bond Films, leaving out a few titles such as Die Another Day and Moonraker which are generally considered the least favorite of the ever popular series. The game takes the best elements or sections of these top Bond films and allows the player to replicate the action in a gaming environment.

The gameplay in 007 Legends could be compared to the previous title Goldeneye Reloaded, and the graphics are almost identical in quality. The interaction with players will not overwhelm you, but if you are an avid bond fan there is much to be played and enjoyed here. However this time round, they have improved on the awful combat controls and weapon aiming which plagued the last title, making this so much more engaging than the previous encounter with the Bond series.

During the campaign missions you have the ability to upgrade the Bond character as well as an extensive array of weapons which can be obtained during gameplay and which can also be updated as the missions progress. I suppose you have to ask yourself are you a Bond fan, if you are then this title may live up to your expectations, there are some pretty cool missions with scenes such as the one with the snowmobiles in which there are intense firefights as you ski down the mountain being pursued by them, and the Fort Knox battle in Goldfinger where the battle against wave after wave of enemies takes place.

There is also a multiplayer option in 007 Legends which has various modes of play, one example would be the Legends mode, and this mode allows gamers to take on the role of various bond characters which each have unique weapons at there disposal. I suppose in the end there are only so many which can be played before repetition sets in and the overall experience in this mode online becomes limited. There are other modes online which are more befitting.

Granted it may not have the overall intense graphics of various rival games, but I feel that with this new Bond title we see elements of Bond coming back to true form, as originally seen in such classic Bond titles such as The Man with the Golden Gun.

Those that enjoy Bond in general will be able to forgive the slight glitches and occasional sound issues which sometimes appear during heavy combat. Overall a much improved Bond experience.


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