User Review

16 Reviews


  Viewing Reviews 1-10 of 16
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Posted:
2013-08-15

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

7.6

007 Legends for the Xbox 360 enables Daniel Craig to take on various assignments from the pick of the Bond Films, leaving out a few titles such as Die Another Day and Moonraker which are generally considered the least favorite of the ever popular series. The game takes the best elements or sections of these top Bond films and allows the player to replicate the action in a gaming environment.

The gameplay in 007 Legends could be compared to the previous title Goldeneye Reloaded, and the graphics are almost identical in quality. The interaction with players will not overwhelm you, but if you are an avid bond fan there is much to be played and enjoyed here. However this time round, they have improved on the awful combat controls and weapon aiming which plagued the last title, making this so much more engaging than the previous encounter with the Bond series.

During the campaign missions you have the ability to upgrade the Bond character as well as an extensive array of weapons which can be obtained during gameplay and which can also be updated as the missions progress. I suppose you have to ask yourself are you a Bond fan, if you are then this title may live up to your expectations, there are some pretty cool missions with scenes such as the one with the snowmobiles in which there are intense firefights as you ski down the mountain being pursued by them, and the Fort Knox battle in Goldfinger where the battle against wave after wave of enemies takes place.

There is also a multiplayer option in 007 Legends which has various modes of play, one example would be the Legends mode, and this mode allows gamers to take on the role of various bond characters which each have unique weapons at there disposal. I suppose in the end there are only so many which can be played before repetition sets in and the overall experience in this mode online becomes limited. There are other modes online which are more befitting.

Granted it may not have the overall intense graphics of various rival games, but I feel that with this new Bond title we see elements of Bond coming back to true form, as originally seen in such classic Bond titles such as The Man with the Golden Gun.

Those that enjoy Bond in general will be able to forgive the slight glitches and occasional sound issues which sometimes appear during heavy combat. Overall a much improved Bond experience.

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Posted:
2014-11-12

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Don't play The Walking Dead: Season 2 if you haven't played the original. The best part of the game is how a character in the original series grows and evolves into a fully realized, three dimensional protagonist worthy of the time you'll invest in each of the five episodes. If you haven't seen where girl protagonist Clementine comes from, this second season's greatest strength will be significantly diluted for you.

Well that's not to say nothing else has improved. Whereas the first season asked us to believe that if we shook its hand, it would take us on a journey where our choices mattered, all it did was deliver an electric shock. This time choices actually do have a rather sizable impact on the conclusion of certain story lines. Elsewhere, the graphics are a little nicer in that the characters look less like they're made of polygons and the trees resemble something more like real trees. That's about it.

There are still technical issues that Telltale seems to refuse to address. On PC, sometimes bizarre glitches will impede progress. Even on more stable consoles, there are intermittent graphics issues. They've put out 10 episodes now and one additional bonus story, as well other games on the same engine. It's high time they fixed these issues that detract from the experience.

What do you do in The Walking Dead: Season 2? Well, you start out alone trying to survive in a zombie wilderness in a promising first chapter, which is a great deal more original and has writing that is much more constructive to establishing a heart of its own. Then you join with the usual cliched crew of survivors in the second episode. It all goes tumbling downhill when a mad mastermind of Ye Olde Safeguard Against Zombie Horde clearly inspired by the series' Governor character appears. From then on, it's a matter of Choose Your Own Zombie Cliche.

The problem is that Telltale isn't as good as this kind of thing as you might imagine from the praise the series has gotten. Telltale used to make games based on comedy properties: old point and click adventures like Sam & Max and Monkey Island, or animation and movies that depended on funny, memorable properties like Strong Bad, Back to the Future or Wallace & Gromit. The Walking Dead owes just as much of its interface to the tradition of those old adventures games where you select icons to look, talk, use or interact with objects and people, but it's really in the style of Japanese visual novel games which have you pick choices from available options at plot junctures. More importantly, because these are not comedy characters who build their identities through the standard point and click style of comical dialogue responses to clicking on the environment, the characters in Walking Dead: Season 2 come off as flat.

This was not as much a problem in the first season, because Telltale was largely plagiarizing in that one. Without an extremely inspired and masterful zombie novel behind it -- The Road is perhaps the best of its kind in written fiction -- Season 2 flounders. It can't fall back on the cultural ties a bond between an adult protecting a child can bring to a story. While not as manipulative in the same way, you can see the Telltale writers working hard from their Scriptwriting 101 classes to make you feel for characters by forcing contrived expository dialogue down their throats.

Dear Telltale, please observe that there are thousands of ways people get to know each other and form bonds that can cause emotional strife in a story. Picking and choosing from the most obvious exposition devices possible in order to let players choose who they save and who they let die is just as manipulative as exploiting the natural tendency to want to protect children in the first game.

In the end, just like one might read a romance novel for the heartbreak and passion of the inevitable hookup, or a fantasy novel for the creativity of its lore and world, The Walking Dead: Season 2 is best left as a curio for those who really love their apocalyptic fiction.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-12

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Don't play The Walking Dead: Season 2 if you haven't played the original. The best part of the game is how a character in the original series grows and evolves into a fully realized, three dimensional protagonist worthy of the time you'll invest in each of the five episodes. If you haven't seen where girl protagonist Clementine comes from, this second season's greatest strength will be significantly diluted for you.

Well that's not to say nothing else has improved. Whereas the first season asked us to believe that if we shook its hand, it would take us on a journey where our choices mattered, all it did was deliver an electric shock. This time choices actually do have a rather sizable impact on the conclusion of certain story lines. Elsewhere, the graphics are a little nicer in that the characters look less like they're made of polygons and the trees resemble something more like real trees. That's about it.

There are still technical issues that Telltale seems to refuse to address. On PC, sometimes bizarre glitches will impede progress. Even on more stable consoles, there are intermittent graphics issues. They've put out 10 episodes now and one additional bonus story, as well other games on the same engine. It's high time they fixed these issues that detract from the experience.

What do you do in The Walking Dead: Season 2? Well, you start out alone trying to survive in a zombie wilderness in a promising first chapter, which is a great deal more original and has writing that is much more constructive to establishing a heart of its own. Then you join with the usual cliched crew of survivors in the second episode. It all goes tumbling downhill when a mad mastermind of Ye Olde Safeguard Against Zombie Horde clearly inspired by the series' Governor character appears. From then on, it's a matter of Choose Your Own Zombie Cliche.

The problem is that Telltale isn't as good as this kind of thing as you might imagine from the praise the series has gotten. Telltale used to make games based on comedy properties: old point and click adventures like Sam & Max and Monkey Island, or animation and movies that depended on funny, memorable properties like Strong Bad, Back to the Future or Wallace & Gromit. The Walking Dead owes just as much of its interface to the tradition of those old adventures games where you select icons to look, talk, use or interact with objects and people, but it's really in the style of Japanese visual novel games which have you pick choices from available options at plot junctures. More importantly, because these are not comedy characters who build their identities through the standard point and click style of comical dialogue responses to clicking on the environment, the characters in Walking Dead: Season 2 come off as flat.

This was not as much a problem in the first season, because Telltale was largely plagiarizing in that one. Without an extremely inspired and masterful zombie novel behind it -- The Road is perhaps the best of its kind in written fiction -- Season 2 flounders. It can't fall back on the cultural ties a bond between an adult protecting a child can bring to a story. While not as manipulative in the same way, you can see the Telltale writers working hard from their Scriptwriting 101 classes to make you feel for characters by forcing contrived expository dialogue down their throats.

Dear Telltale, please observe that there are thousands of ways people get to know each other and form bonds that can cause emotional strife in a story. Picking and choosing from the most obvious exposition devices possible in order to let players choose who they save and who they let die is just as manipulative as exploiting the natural tendency to want to protect children in the first game.

In the end, just like one might read a romance novel for the heartbreak and passion of the inevitable hookup, or a fantasy novel for the creativity of its lore and world, The Walking Dead: Season 2 is best left as a curio for those who really love their apocalyptic fiction.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-12

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Don't play The Walking Dead: Season 2 if you haven't played the original. The best part of the game is how a character in the original series grows and evolves into a fully realized, three dimensional protagonist worthy of the time you'll invest in each of the five episodes. If you haven't seen where girl protagonist Clementine comes from, this second season's greatest strength will be significantly diluted for you.

Well that's not to say nothing else has improved. Whereas the first season asked us to believe that if we shook its hand, it would take us on a journey where our choices mattered, all it did was deliver an electric shock. This time choices actually do have a rather sizable impact on the conclusion of certain story lines. Elsewhere, the graphics are a little nicer in that the characters look less like they're made of polygons and the trees resemble something more like real trees. That's about it.

There are still technical issues that Telltale seems to refuse to address. On PC, sometimes bizarre glitches will impede progress. Even on more stable consoles, there are intermittent graphics issues. They've put out 10 episodes now and one additional bonus story, as well other games on the same engine. It's high time they fixed these issues that detract from the experience.

What do you do in The Walking Dead: Season 2? Well, you start out alone trying to survive in a zombie wilderness in a promising first chapter, which is a great deal more original and has writing that is much more constructive to establishing a heart of its own. Then you join with the usual cliched crew of survivors in the second episode. It all goes tumbling downhill when a mad mastermind of Ye Olde Safeguard Against Zombie Horde clearly inspired by the series' Governor character appears. From then on, it's a matter of Choose Your Own Zombie Cliche.

The problem is that Telltale isn't as good as this kind of thing as you might imagine from the praise the series has gotten. Telltale used to make games based on comedy properties: old point and click adventures like Sam & Max and Monkey Island, or animation and movies that depended on funny, memorable properties like Strong Bad, Back to the Future or Wallace & Gromit. The Walking Dead owes just as much of its interface to the tradition of those old adventures games where you select icons to look, talk, use or interact with objects and people, but it's really in the style of Japanese visual novel games which have you pick choices from available options at plot junctures. More importantly, because these are not comedy characters who build their identities through the standard point and click style of comical dialogue responses to clicking on the environment, the characters in Walking Dead: Season 2 come off as flat.

This was not as much a problem in the first season, because Telltale was largely plagiarizing in that one. Without an extremely inspired and masterful zombie novel behind it -- The Road is perhaps the best of its kind in written fiction -- Season 2 flounders. It can't fall back on the cultural ties a bond between an adult protecting a child can bring to a story. While not as manipulative in the same way, you can see the Telltale writers working hard from their Scriptwriting 101 classes to make you feel for characters by forcing contrived expository dialogue down their throats.

Dear Telltale, please observe that there are thousands of ways people get to know each other and form bonds that can cause emotional strife in a story. Picking and choosing from the most obvious exposition devices possible in order to let players choose who they save and who they let die is just as manipulative as exploiting the natural tendency to want to protect children in the first game.

In the end, just like one might read a romance novel for the heartbreak and passion of the inevitable hookup, or a fantasy novel for the creativity of its lore and world, The Walking Dead: Season 2 is best left as a curio for those who really love their apocalyptic fiction.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-12

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Don't play The Walking Dead: Season 2 if you haven't played the original. The best part of the game is how a character in the original series grows and evolves into a fully realized, three dimensional protagonist worthy of the time you'll invest in each of the five episodes. If you haven't seen where girl protagonist Clementine comes from, this second season's greatest strength will be significantly diluted for you.

Well that's not to say nothing else has improved. Whereas the first season asked us to believe that if we shook its hand, it would take us on a journey where our choices mattered, all it did was deliver an electric shock. This time choices actually do have a rather sizable impact on the conclusion of certain story lines. Elsewhere, the graphics are a little nicer in that the characters look less like they're made of polygons and the trees resemble something more like real trees. That's about it.

There are still technical issues that Telltale seems to refuse to address. On PC, sometimes bizarre glitches will impede progress. Even on more stable consoles, there are intermittent graphics issues. They've put out 10 episodes now and one additional bonus story, as well other games on the same engine. It's high time they fixed these issues that detract from the experience.

What do you do in The Walking Dead: Season 2? Well, you start out alone trying to survive in a zombie wilderness in a promising first chapter, which is a great deal more original and has writing that is much more constructive to establishing a heart of its own. Then you join with the usual cliched crew of survivors in the second episode. It all goes tumbling downhill when a mad mastermind of Ye Olde Safeguard Against Zombie Horde clearly inspired by the series' Governor character appears. From then on, it's a matter of Choose Your Own Zombie Cliche.

The problem is that Telltale isn't as good as this kind of thing as you might imagine from the praise the series has gotten. Telltale used to make games based on comedy properties: old point and click adventures like Sam & Max and Monkey Island, or animation and movies that depended on funny, memorable properties like Strong Bad, Back to the Future or Wallace & Gromit. The Walking Dead owes just as much of its interface to the tradition of those old adventures games where you select icons to look, talk, use or interact with objects and people, but it's really in the style of Japanese visual novel games which have you pick choices from available options at plot junctures. More importantly, because these are not comedy characters who build their identities through the standard point and click style of comical dialogue responses to clicking on the environment, the characters in Walking Dead: Season 2 come off as flat.

This was not as much a problem in the first season, because Telltale was largely plagiarizing in that one. Without an extremely inspired and masterful zombie novel behind it -- The Road is perhaps the best of its kind in written fiction -- Season 2 flounders. It can't fall back on the cultural ties a bond between an adult protecting a child can bring to a story. While not as manipulative in the same way, you can see the Telltale writers working hard from their Scriptwriting 101 classes to make you feel for characters by forcing contrived expository dialogue down their throats.

Dear Telltale, please observe that there are thousands of ways people get to know each other and form bonds that can cause emotional strife in a story. Picking and choosing from the most obvious exposition devices possible in order to let players choose who they save and who they let die is just as manipulative as exploiting the natural tendency to want to protect children in the first game.

In the end, just like one might read a romance novel for the heartbreak and passion of the inevitable hookup, or a fantasy novel for the creativity of its lore and world, The Walking Dead: Season 2 is best left as a curio for those who really love their apocalyptic fiction.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-11-12

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

6.5

Don't play The Walking Dead: Season 2 if you haven't played the original. The best part of the game is how a character in the original series grows and evolves into a fully realized, three dimensional protagonist worthy of the time you'll invest in each of the five episodes. If you haven't seen where girl protagonist Clementine comes from, this second season's greatest strength will be significantly diluted for you.

Well that's not to say nothing else has improved. Whereas the first season asked us to believe that if we shook its hand, it would take us on a journey where our choices mattered, all it did was deliver an electric shock. This time choices actually do have a rather sizable impact on the conclusion of certain story lines. Elsewhere, the graphics are a little nicer in that the characters look less like they're made of polygons and the trees resemble something more like real trees. That's about it.

There are still technical issues that Telltale seems to refuse to address. On PC, sometimes bizarre glitches will impede progress. Even on more stable consoles, there are intermittent graphics issues. They've put out 10 episodes now and one additional bonus story, as well other games on the same engine. It's high time they fixed these issues that detract from the experience.

What do you do in The Walking Dead: Season 2? Well, you start out alone trying to survive in a zombie wilderness in a promising first chapter, which is a great deal more original and has writing that is much more constructive to establishing a heart of its own. Then you join with the usual cliched crew of survivors in the second episode. It all goes tumbling downhill when a mad mastermind of Ye Olde Safeguard Against Zombie Horde clearly inspired by the series' Governor character appears. From then on, it's a matter of Choose Your Own Zombie Cliche.

The problem is that Telltale isn't as good as this kind of thing as you might imagine from the praise the series has gotten. Telltale used to make games based on comedy properties: old point and click adventures like Sam & Max and Monkey Island, or animation and movies that depended on funny, memorable properties like Strong Bad, Back to the Future or Wallace & Gromit. The Walking Dead owes just as much of its interface to the tradition of those old adventures games where you select icons to look, talk, use or interact with objects and people, but it's really in the style of Japanese visual novel games which have you pick choices from available options at plot junctures. More importantly, because these are not comedy characters who build their identities through the standard point and click style of comical dialogue responses to clicking on the environment, the characters in Walking Dead: Season 2 come off as flat.

This was not as much a problem in the first season, because Telltale was largely plagiarizing in that one. Without an extremely inspired and masterful zombie novel behind it -- The Road is perhaps the best of its kind in written fiction -- Season 2 flounders. It can't fall back on the cultural ties a bond between an adult protecting a child can bring to a story. While not as manipulative in the same way, you can see the Telltale writers working hard from their Scriptwriting 101 classes to make you feel for characters by forcing contrived expository dialogue down their throats.

Dear Telltale, please observe that there are thousands of ways people get to know each other and form bonds that can cause emotional strife in a story. Picking and choosing from the most obvious exposition devices possible in order to let players choose who they save and who they let die is just as manipulative as exploiting the natural tendency to want to protect children in the first game.

In the end, just like one might read a romance novel for the heartbreak and passion of the inevitable hookup, or a fantasy novel for the creativity of its lore and world, The Walking Dead: Season 2 is best left as a curio for those who really love their apocalyptic fiction.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-08-15

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

Assassins Creed Revelations is a great installment in the series. It features an extremely detailed 15th-century Constantinople, and incredibly detailed environments, civilizations, forest and mountains. The gameplay is extremely smooth and free flowing, and so is the world as it rarely restricts you. You are free to climb on any building or dive into any haystack you please!

Assassins Creed features quite a compelling story of Ezio, his third and final chapter. As well as Sofia, as they seem to fall in love despite of all the killing Ezio is busy doing. They do a really good job showing the growing affection between the two and you will clearly feel them falling for each other. Unlike other games, the cinematics in this game are extremely well done and put together, no longer clunky and bland. The games visuals have received quite a nice improvement over its predecessor as well.

Revelations is similar to its previous games in that, a lot of the missions involve you stalking and killing prey, or meeting different targets to get information on other targets you are trying to kill. A big part of the game is when Ezio discovers clues and keys to the library of Altair. This is where the "dungeon" scenes come into play. Many parts of the game will also feature Altair himself, and players will get the chance to experience some moments in Altair's life. The different stories add a refreshing take to the game, keeping it interesting and appealing.

On the combat side, Revelations features ton of free flowing tricks and stunts, allowing you to move freely and gracefully around the area. You also have direct access to secondary weapons, in addition to primary ones. In old games you would go out and take over an enemy base, but in this game, enemies will attempt to take their bases back. Its a new and well done feature implemented in this title.

The multiplayer in Revelations has a very wide range of customization options and game modes that will keep you occupied for a long time. There is a brand new story mode that you can unlock scene by scene in the multiplayer game modes. The game modes offer a wide array of ways to kill, from stealthy stalking, to frantic killing and chasing. The maps are unfortunately small, and this makes the modes a little less intense than they could be with more expansive maps.

Revelations all in all is still very much like its predecessors. It offers a great lead character, a visually compelling story line, with great story telling. All these great things help make this a memorable finale to the series. The updated graphics and new features such as direct access to all you weapons, including secondary ones, the extremely fun and very diverse multiplayer features all help to makes this the best Assassins Creed that has come out yet. If you have been following the Assassins Creed story, be sure to pick this game up, because hey, you owe it to yourself!

avatar name

Posted:
2013-08-15

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

8.6

Assassins Creed Revelations is a great installment in the series. It features an extremely detailed 15th-century Constantinople, and incredibly detailed environments, civilizations, forest and mountains. The gameplay is extremely smooth and free flowing, and so is the world as it rarely restricts you. You are free to climb on any building or dive into any haystack you please!

Assassins Creed features quite a compelling story of Ezio, his third and final chapter. As well as Sofia, as they seem to fall in love despite of all the killing Ezio is busy doing. They do a really good job showing the growing affection between the two and you will clearly feel them falling for each other. Unlike other games, the cinematics in this game are extremely well done and put together, no longer clunky and bland. The games visuals have received quite a nice improvement over its predecessor as well.

Revelations is similar to its previous games in that, a lot of the missions involve you stalking and killing prey, or meeting different targets to get information on other targets you are trying to kill. A big part of the game is when Ezio discovers clues and keys to the library of Altair. This is where the "dungeon" scenes come into play. Many parts of the game will also feature Altair himself, and players will get the chance to experience some moments in Altair's life. The different stories add a refreshing take to the game, keeping it interesting and appealing.

On the combat side, Revelations features ton of free flowing tricks and stunts, allowing you to move freely and gracefully around the area. You also have direct access to secondary weapons, in addition to primary ones. In old games you would go out and take over an enemy base, but in this game, enemies will attempt to take their bases back. Its a new and well done feature implemented in this title.

The multiplayer in Revelations has a very wide range of customization options and game modes that will keep you occupied for a long time. There is a brand new story mode that you can unlock scene by scene in the multi player game modes. The game modes offer a wide array of ways to kill, from stealthy stalking, to frantic killing and chasing. The maps are unfortunately small, and this makes the modes a little less intense than they could be with more expansive maps.

Revelations all in all is still very much like its predecessors. It offers a great lead character, a visually compelling storyline, with great storytelling. All these great things help make this a memorable finale to the series. The updated graphics and new features such as direct access to all you weapons, including secondary ones, the extremely fun and very diverse multiplayer features all help to makes this the best Assassins Creed that has come out yet. If you have been following the Assassins Creed story, be sure to pick this game up, because hey, you owe it to yourself!

User Reviews

D-Day (PC) - 16 reviews

avatar name

Posted:
2013-08-16

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

3.0

Leave D-Day to history. The fact that this is based on one of history's most climactic events should have made D-Day a game to look forward to. Unfortunately, the historical reference should have been left out for this just plain flops.

When people think of D-Day, even those who were born 50 or more years later can emphasize with the events that changed the world. This game was supposed to commemorate those events and the men who survived the horrors. Unfortunately, this game came out with a lot of problems, it is tedious, there is no inspiration to speak of, the voice-overs are so bad they are irritating and that is just the beginning of worse things to come.

D-Day is a real time strategy PC game that offers all the basic features that worked with others of the same category. There is panning, tilting and rotation of the camera by using the mouse and there are no pesky keyboard controls that can distract the gamer. There are also choices of how fast or how slow the game is to be played. The gamer can even pause the game if they want to. All this really sounds good when one reads or listens but playing it is unexpectedly ugly.

First off, the tutorial is pitifully uninspiring for it tells nothing about how to play the game or use the controls, instead it talks about the voice-overs, which page in the manual to turn to and how to basically do nothing. There are no interface buttons discussed, no options, nothing.

Now, I like my steak medium rare, but I don't like my games half-cooked. This is a nightmare that gives a bad name to that historical event. First of all, the troops are portrayed to be either too stupid or too idiotic. They do not understand or follow commands. Second, the German troops acted more like Japanese soldiers in their Kamikaze attempts to subjugate the allied forces. Then there is the getting lost. The traffic beats New York traffic 100/1 and other oddities that I cannot wrap my head around in.

The interface; I really can't understand the interface either for there are so many buttons for just one operation. Did I mention that the tutorial sucked big time and failed to discuss this? And, then, to add to the chaos, there was no way to distinguish one soldier from the next: medic, from scouts to snipers. Nada. Zilch.

Now, usually when I write a review I have to include both the good and the bad and as this is so bad, I have to scramble for something good to say. And honestly, the graphics to D-Day is really good. The models are detailed to the point of realism. As for the music, again, I have to honestly write that this is an inspiring choice of anthem. And here I have to stop for I can't think anything more.

What do I recommend in the end? Go to History Channel, the film clips on D-Day are more inspiring and interesting.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-08-23

smeagol

Super Gamer Dude

8.5

Well it's that time of year again. There's another Call of Duty out and of course it's immediately the best game in the series yet, the best selling in the series, the list goes on. So here's what I think of it. Whether you agree or not well that's up to you. So, here, we...go.

Black Ops 2 probably has one of the most interesting stories in the Call of Duty series to date. Using a similar system as the original Black Ops where the story alternates between flashback sequences, set in the 1980's towards the end of the Cold War where the player controls Alex Mason, and present day sequences set in the year 2025 where the player controls Mason's son David. The story is centered around the game's antagonist Raul Menendez with the flashback missions telling the story of what caused Menendez hates America and his decision to take revenge of both the USA and the Western world. The present day sequences then go on to detail what Menendez's revenge involves and how it is carried out whilst David Masons struggles to prevent Menendez's devious plan from coming to fruition.

What is, perhaps, the most interesting feature of the game's story is the use of an RPG-esque mechanic where the player's actions throughout the game effect the outcome of the story. This is effected by factors such as the choices the player makes at certain points, whether the player finds hidden information in certain missions and whether or not the player successfully completes RTS style strike force missions.

Personally I would have liked them to keep the game's setting entirely in the future which is far more entertaining and interesting than the 1980's sequences. On another personal note it felt like the characters were for some reason unknown to all but the writers are all overly gruff about everything for no reason at all. In fact it got to the point that I found myself quoting lines from Batman at points which was entertaining up to the point where I lost my voice.

Overall the angle the story is approached from makes up for the fact that in terms of writing it is merely average at best.

Black Ops 2's multiplayer is largely the same as previous Call of Duty titles. It offers a smorgasbord of game types in which any player will surely find something to keep them entertained for hours on end. What is perhaps the most interesting feature of the multiplayer is the class customization.

Firstly Black Ops 2, unlike its predecessor has returned to the treadmill style unlock system of leveling up to unlock new weapons and then using these weapons to unlock attachments for them which is frankly a terrible system, however the unlock points system has been kept for score streaks, both types of grenades, perks and wildcards. But that's not the point.

The main point of interest is the 10 slot system that is used. Put simply the player is given 10 slots which the player can use for weapon's attachments, perks, grenades and wild cards. This gives the player a certain level of freedom as they can choose any combination of weapons, attachments, perks, grenades and wildcards. This means that the player can go with the standard loadout of primary weapon, secondary weapon, 3 perks and both lethal and non-lethal grenades. It is the addition of wildcards is what gives players the increased freedom. Wildcards give players bonuses ranging from carrying multiple primary weapons to extra perks meaning that a player could choose to go weapons heavy with 2 assault rifles with lots of extras but no perks or they could choose to take just a pistol but have lots of perks that give them little advantages over other players.

The kill streak system has also received a makeover. Although the rewards are the same as the previous titles but with a futuristic twist such as the K-9 robot dogs. However, this time around instead of getting a certain number of kills to get a reward. Players must now earn a certain score instead of kills. This feels like an attempt at encouraging teamwork as the required scores are often awkward numbers such as 450 points which is the equivalent of four kills and an assist, however this doesn't really do much in the end as it can easily be over come by just getting an extra kill and going over the required score.

To be perfectly honest with you the multiplayer is just the same as the previous games in the series and anyone reading this will probably know whether they like it or not already.

So, here we are at the final verdict. Now I could give this a score out of 10 but frankly that's pointless because my definition of let's say 8 out of ten will be different to everyone else's so I'll just summarize the game and let you make the decision for yourselves. Black Ops 2 is, for all intents and purposes, a Call of Duty game. If you don't like Call of Duty already then you won't like this one. If you're new to the series it's a decent entry point for learning how the game works and getting used to the game but don't expect most of the new features such as score streaks to be in the next edition as it will most likely revert to the Modern Warfare set up. This game is really aimed at players who are already invested in the series but want to see a bit of an innovation to the game but not so much that it's an entire overhaul.


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