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12 Reviews


  Viewing Reviews 1-10 of 12
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Posted:
2013-12-16

mig51

Super Gamer Dude

7.9

Donkey Kong Country Returns for the Wii was an excellent return to the Donkey Kong Country series for Nintendo, and did a great job of evoking the feeling of the old Super Nintendo games that so many of us fell in love with as children. While the name of Donkey Kong Country Returns 3D might suggest a new game in the series, this title is simply a port of the original Wii game.

However, that is not to say that it degrades the game at all - in fact, Donkey Kong Country Returns always felt sort of like it should have been on the 3DS in the first place. The game's focus on multiple planes within a 2D platforming environment makes it perfect for the 3DS. Even better yet, this refresh of a classic Wii game also gets a few new features.

For starters, the designers have added a new mode with the rather blunt moniker "new mode". This mode more or less translates into an easy mode for the game, giving the player an extra point of damage they can take as well as adding some new items to Cranky Kong's shop that make the game far easier - like a barrel that allows you to respawn Diddy Kong at any time. The 3DS version of the game also tacks 8 new levels on to the end of the game, although these levels barely warrant a mention due to the fact that they are pretty generic and offer no new challenge or anything meaningfully different from the rest of the game's levels.

The port also brings some new problems to the table though. The controls, especially when it comes to charging feel a bit weird. While the shaking of the Wii remote felt pretty spot on in the original version, the remapping of that movement to a single button hold has made it awkward. Even worse yet, the down scaling from the Wii, while mostly successful has left a few residual performance issues in its wake.

If you played the original version of the game for the Wii, you will immediately notice that the 3DS version runs at a frame rate of only 30 fps instead of the original's 60 fps - but even more importantly, there are many times throughout the game where the frame rate will drop precipitously without any warning, ruining countless jumps and tricky platforming bits. It is far too clear that this was once a Wii game that was downgraded to work on the 3DS instead.

All of that said, Donkey Kong Country Returns remains an excellent platformer in its new portable form. Sure, the Wii version might remain the better version, and there is absolutely no reason to pick this up if you already played it on the Wii, but for people new to the game or to the series, Donkey Kong Country Returns 3D is a great place to start, and remains one of the best 2D platformers to be released in recent memory.

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Posted:
2014-06-15

Better on multiplayer.

mig51

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

Need for Speed Most Wanted has the weird position of sharing its name with a title from earlier in this console generation, but being a spiritual successor to an entirely different title from that generation. The original Most Wanted was one of those titles that bridged the gap between the PS2 and the PS3 by being released in very slight variations on both systems. It was a fun and silly title that used live-action actors to depict its tale of street racers and the police.

The latest Need for Speed Most Wanted has absolutely nothing to do with that game, though. Developed by Criterion, the game pulls almost all of its core gameplay elements from Burnout Paradise, with a few major tweaks. Just like Burnout: Paradise, it takes place in an open world where both the traversal between races and the racing itself happens. Also just like Paradise, it has a massive amount of leaderboards to compete with friends on, this time supplemented by the autolog system that EA has become so fond of.

Most Wanted's multiplayer is also very similar to that of Paradise, in that it simply dumps people into the world and allows the host to choose events, which consist of crazy challenges instead of the usual point-to-point races. For example, one event requires to park yourself on the wing of a plane and stay there. The players compete in the event, then drive on to the next one. This mode really shines in how it encourages players to be complete dicks to one another. If you are taken down during a multiplayer event, you are automatically disqualified, encouraging constant violence between players and creating an extremely hectic and fun experience.

All this said, the game absolutely falls apart when it comes to the single player. Solo play shifts the game's focus to its wide array of cars. As you drive around in the world, you find new, extremely expensive cars just sitting on the side of the road for you to hop in. Each car has a set events that you have to win in order to unlock upgrades and get "speed points" which allow you to race AI drivers on the "Most Wanted" list.

While the system is not inherently flawed, it quickly grows repetitive. The races that initially seem to be car-specific are actually repeated ad nauseam. Not every vehicle has the exact same races, but they pop up enough times to make the task of earning points a grind. The addition of cops to the Burnout Paradise equation feels out of place at best, and the difficulty of escaping from them with very little reward make them utterly pointless at worse.

Whether you should get Need for Speed: Most Wanted depends on what you want out of it. If you are looking for a fantastic multiplayer arcade racer, by all means, pick it up. However, if you are looking for a good solo racer, you should probably look elsewhere.

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Posted:
2013-08-17

mig51

Super Gamer Dude

7.3

Lego Harry Potter Years 5-7 for Wii is the seventh release in the Lego video games franchise. It is more of a direct sequel to Harry Potter Years 1-4 than a brand new game, but anyone who played the first Harry Potter in this series will tell you that's a good thing.

The famous Lego humor is as strong as ever in this version's cutscenes. The game does a fine parody of many of the famous scenes from the films and even manages to make the death of a major character seem funny. Lego's writing team really should be given a raise for how they have continuously offered up outstanding material in every game in the franchise so far.

This title once again features co op gameplay and the world is filled to the brim with countless secrets to unlock including additional characters and costumes.

Gameplay has the four final Harry Potter films split up into six playable worlds. Hogwarts castle serves as a hub in between worlds with plenty to explore and unlock.

The game does feel a bit redundant since this is a reprise of much from the 1-4 game. Many of the worlds you visit are the same and so are quite a few of the spells you will cast. While this is slightly disappointing, it's not any worse than the movies, which returned players to the same environments as well. At least it's being true to its source material, eh?

One highlight is that the hub surrounding the castle we mentioned did receive a bit of an expansion. You can explore the Dark Forest, an observatory and other fun areas.

We should mention again that the developer really spared no expense filling this game with unlockables. There are entire parts of the hub world that are optional and don't need to be visited to beat the main story. More than 200 Harry Potter Lego characters can be purchased with the Lego studs you'll pick up throughout the levels.

The game's graphics are what you would expect. Each Harry Potter character is rendered as a Lego and the resemblances for most are uncanny.

Sound is another strong point of the game, all of your favorites sounds from the Harry Potter soundtrack are here and they serve as a perfect backdrop as you smash Lego blocks and wander around Hogwarts castle.

We'd be remiss if we didn't mention that this title suffers from the usual Lego franchise downfalls, like shoddy platforming, too much button spamming and a weak camera, but the developer in this case has gone to such lengths to pack the game with bonuses and extras that it almost makes up for the game's shortcomings.

Lego Harry Potter Years 5-7 is not without its flaws. It will seem a bit redundant at times if you played the last game and the controls and camera can be frustrating. But if you are a Lego franchise veteran, this game provides exactly what you want: Excellent fan service and incredible fun.

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Posted:
2014-02-21

mig51

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

Need for Speed Most Wanted has the weird position of sharing its name with a title from earlier in this console generation, but being a spiritual successor to an entirely different title from that generation. The original Most Wanted was one of those titles that bridged the gap between the PS2 and the PS3 by being released in very slight variations on both systems. It was a fun and silly title that used live-action actors to depict its tale of street racers and the police.

The latest Need for Speed Most Wanted has absolutely nothing to do with that game, though. Developed by Criterion, the game pulls almost all of its core gameplay elements from Burnout Paradise, with a few major tweaks. Just like Burnout: Paradise, it takes place in an open world where both the traversal between races and the racing itself happens. Also just like Paradise, it has a massive amount of leaderboards to compete with friends on, this time supplemented by the autolog system that EA has become so fond of.

Most Wanted's multiplayer is also very similar to that of Paradise, in that it simply dumps people into the world and allows the host to choose events, which consist of crazy challenges instead of the usual point-to-point races. For example, one event requires to park yourself on the wing of a plane and stay there. The players compete in the event, then drive on to the next one. This mode really shines in how it encourages players to be complete dicks to one another. If you are taken down during a multiplayer event, you are automatically disqualified, encouraging constant violence between players and creating an extremely hectic and fun experience.

All this said, the game absolutely falls apart when it comes to the single player. Solo play shifts the game's focus to its wide array of cars. As you drive around in the world, you find new, extremely expensive cars just sitting on the side of the road for you to hop in. Each car has a set events that you have to win in order to unlock upgrades and get "speed points" which allow you to race AI drivers on the "Most Wanted" list.

While the system is not inherently flawed, it quickly grows repetitive. The races that initially seem to be car-specific are actually repeated ad nauseum. Not every vehicle has the exact same races, but they pop up enough times to make the task of earning points a grind. The addition of cops to the Burnout Paradise equation feels out of place at best, and the difficulty of escaping from them with very little reward make them utterly pointless at worse.

Whether you should get Need for Speed: Most Wanted depends on what you want out of it. If you are looking for a fantastic multiplayer arcade racer, by all means, pick it up. However, if you are looking for a good solo racer, you should probably look elsewhere.

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Posted:
2014-01-15

mig51

Super Gamer Dude

8.2

No matter what else comes out for a Nintendo, each of them is always remembered by the Mario game or games that came out for that system. For most systems this was a great thing, but the GameCube's Mario game, Super Mario Sunshine, has been dismissed by both critics and consumers as one of the worst 3D Mario games ever made. Can Super Mario Galaxy show the world that Sunshine was just a hiccup in an otherwise stellar franchise?

The short answer to this question is a resounding yes, but lets look at the reasons why. By setting Super Mario Galaxy in space, the game designers found it much easier to each world (level) from each other visually and stylistically. That said, the best thing about this clear separation between each world is that they can each have their own distinct rules. Past games have done this to some extent, but every level in Super Mario Galaxy looks one hundred percent unique and interesting.

Super Mario Galaxy also ditches the extremely gimmicky water backpack from Super Mario Sunshine in favor of a much more tradition 3D platforming style of gameplay. However, the game adds a new kind of collectible called star bits that requires you to point at them on the screen to collect them. I'm sure that Nintendo felt obligated to make use of the system's motion controls, but for games like this, they often just detract from the overall experience.

Thankfully, the sometimes odd motion controls don't take away from the gameplay as a whole. Like most 3D Mario games, Super Mario Galaxy manages to walk the line between being too easy and being too hard. I never felt like I was just breezing through the worlds, but I also never felt like I was being unjustly punished by unforgiving level design, at least for required levels. Some optional levels are certainly crazy hard, but that's the point.

Of course, Super Mario Galaxy is not without its weak spots. Practically every new suit that the game introduces handles terribly, particularly the spring suit. Like any Mario game, the story seems silly and tacked on to the point where you wonder why Nintendo even bothers to write a story for any of their games in the first place. But to be honest, these are minor nitpicks when we're talking about the best game available for the Wii right now.

Super Mario Galaxy sets an incredibly high bar for other games that come out on the Wii, and I certainly hope that they are able to match it, because if they can, the Wii will be able to truly give the Xbox 360 and the PS3 a run for their money when it comes to software. Moreover, Super Mario Galaxy picks the Mario series of 3D platformers back up after they fell so hard in Sunshine, and now I am once again looking forward to whatever Nintendo comes up with for Mario during their next time up at bat.

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Posted:
2013-12-28

mig51

Super Gamer Dude

8.5

F1 Race Stars is a racing simulator game which seems to be aimed mostly towards Mario Kart fans, or at those who enjoyed playing such releases as Cars 2 the Video Game, rather than your typical racing car games such as Forza and Gran Turismo. Some may also get the impression that because it is a cartoon based game that it is geared towards the younger generation, but they would be wrong in this assumption.

The variety of tracks are vastly different to each other, and you may find yourself flying through mines, or over uneven surfaces, and each track seems to be as crazy as the last one. During your driving you must get off to a good start by picking up the power ups, as failing to do this may leave you mid position or worst still back at the rear in last position at the start. Various power ups also effect how the game is played, for instance, a driver might obtain a power up that gives him teleportation abilities, enabling him to reach pole position. Or another power up may enable the safety car that in turn slows the racer down. You also have various obstacles and goodies on the track, such as water spouts or paving slabs which boost the driver's speed. Good old fashioned, sound driving skills are a must if you are to grab all the goodies and rush down the hidden tracks during the more frantic levels.

Some of the tracks are also very well designed having twists and turns, jumps and track loops which make it hard to position the car centrally whilst traveling upside down. The characters are modeled on the leading F1 drivers, except that they are in a cartoon style in fitting with the game style and overall layout.

Due to the gameplay style associated with this game, no levels are the same, due to the power ups effecting the overall state of play, in some cases drastically affecting the game in both good and bad ways depending on the power up obtained, either by you or one of your opponents. Adopting this approach enables replay ability because the same level, should you choose to replay a level, is always different to that of the last, due to the way in which the power ups and characters interacts with each other during this mode of play. That and the numerous obstacles which end up on various tracks where a simple shunt by an opponent for example can throw your positioning into chaos always make for different situations.

The sound quality is superb and the details on the many characters are well designed, and the online gameplay will allow users to race other F1 Race Star fans. In conclusion this racing game has been heavily influenced by previous titles but in this case I think they have done them justice in both appearance and game playability.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-01-30

mig51

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

Need for Speed Most Wanted has the weird position of sharing its name with a title from earlier in this console generation, but being a spiritual successor to an entirely different title from that generation. The original Most Wanted was one of those titles that bridged the gap between the PS2 and the PS3 by being released in very slight variations on both systems. It was a fun and silly title that used live-action actors to depict its tale of street racers and the police.

The latest Need for Speed Most Wanted has absolutely nothing to do with that game, though. Developed by Criterion, the game pulls almost all of its core gameplay elements from Burnout Paradise, with a few major tweaks. Just like Burnout: Paradise, it takes place in an open world where both the traversal between races and the racing itself happens. Also just like Paradise, it has a massive amount of leaderboards to compete with friends on, this time supplemented by the autolog system that EA has become so fond of.

Most Wanted's multiplayer is also very similar to that of Paradise, in that it simply dumps people into the world and allows the host to choose events, which consist of crazy challenges instead of the usual point-to-point races. For example, one event requires to park yourself on the wing of a plane and stay there. The players compete in the event, then drive on to the next one. This mode really shines in how it encourages players to be complete dicks to one another. If you are taken down during a multiplayer event, you are automatically disqualified, encouraging constant violence between players and creating an extremely hectic and fun experience.

All this said, the game absolutely falls apart when it comes to the single player. Solo play shifts the game's focus to its wide array of cars. As you drive around in the world, you find new, extremely expensive cars just sitting on the side of the road for you to hop in. Each car has a set events that you have to win in order to unlock upgrades and get "speed points" which allow you to race AI drivers on the "Most Wanted" list.

While the system is not inherently flawed, it quickly grows repetitive. The races that initially seem to be car-specific are actually repeated ad nauseam. Not every vehicle has the exact same races, but they pop up enough times to make the task of earning points a grind. The addition of cops to the Burnout Paradise equation feels out of place at best, and the difficulty of escaping from them with very little reward make them utterly pointless at worse.

Whether you should get Need for Speed: Most Wanted depends on what you want out of it. If you are looking for a fantastic multiplayer arcade racer, by all means, pick it up. However, if you are looking for a good solo racer, you should probably look elsewhere.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-06-15

Better on multiplayer.

mig51

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

Need for Speed Most Wanted has the weird position of sharing its name with a title from earlier in this console generation, but being a spiritual successor to an entirely different title from that generation. The original Most Wanted was one of those titles that bridged the gap between the PS2 and the PS3 by being released in very slight variations on both systems. It was a fun and silly title that used live-action actors to depict its tale of street racers and the police.

The latest Need for Speed Most Wanted has absolutely nothing to do with that game, though. Developed by Criterion, the game pulls almost all of its core gameplay elements from Burnout Paradise, with a few major tweaks. Just like Burnout: Paradise, it takes place in an open world where both the traversal between races and the racing itself happens. Also just like Paradise, it has a massive amount of leaderboards to compete with friends on, this time supplemented by the autolog system that EA has become so fond of.

Most Wanted's multiplayer is also very similar to that of Paradise, in that it simply dumps people into the world and allows the host to choose events, which consist of crazy challenges instead of the usual point-to-point races. For example, one event requires to park yourself on the wing of a plane and stay there. The players compete in the event, then drive on to the next one. This mode really shines in how it encourages players to be complete dicks to one another. If you are taken down during a multiplayer event, you are automatically disqualified, encouraging constant violence between players and creating an extremely hectic and fun experience.

All this said, the game absolutely falls apart when it comes to the single player. Solo play shifts the game's focus to its wide array of cars. As you drive around in the world, you find new, extremely expensive cars just sitting on the side of the road for you to hop in. Each car has a set events that you have to win in order to unlock upgrades and get "speed points" which allow you to race AI drivers on the "Most Wanted" list.

While the system is not inherently flawed, it quickly grows repetitive. The races that initially seem to be car-specific are actually repeated ad nauseam. Not every vehicle has the exact same races, but they pop up enough times to make the task of earning points a grind. The addition of cops to the Burnout Paradise equation feels out of place at best, and the difficulty of escaping from them with very little reward make them utterly pointless at worse.

Whether you should get Need for Speed: Most Wanted depends on what you want out of it. If you are looking for a fantastic multiplayer arcade racer, by all means, pick it up. However, if you are looking for a good solo racer, you should probably look elsewhere.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-06-15

Better on multiplayer.

mig51

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

Need for Speed Most Wanted has the weird position of sharing its name with a title from earlier in this console generation, but being a spiritual successor to an entirely different title from that generation. The original Most Wanted was one of those titles that bridged the gap between the PS2 and the PS3 by being released in very slight variations on both systems. It was a fun and silly title that used live-action actors to depict its tale of street racers and the police.

The latest Need for Speed Most Wanted has absolutely nothing to do with that game, though. Developed by Criterion, the game pulls almost all of its core gameplay elements from Burnout Paradise, with a few major tweaks. Just like Burnout: Paradise, it takes place in an open world where both the traversal between races and the racing itself happens. Also just like Paradise, it has a massive amount of leaderboards to compete with friends on, this time supplemented by the autolog system that EA has become so fond of.

Most Wanted's multiplayer is also very similar to that of Paradise, in that it simply dumps people into the world and allows the host to choose events, which consist of crazy challenges instead of the usual point-to-point races. For example, one event requires to park yourself on the wing of a plane and stay there. The players compete in the event, then drive on to the next one. This mode really shines in how it encourages players to be complete dicks to one another. If you are taken down during a multiplayer event, you are automatically disqualified, encouraging constant violence between players and creating an extremely hectic and fun experience.

All this said, the game absolutely falls apart when it comes to the single player. Solo play shifts the game's focus to its wide array of cars. As you drive around in the world, you find new, extremely expensive cars just sitting on the side of the road for you to hop in. Each car has a set events that you have to win in order to unlock upgrades and get "speed points" which allow you to race AI drivers on the "Most Wanted" list.

While the system is not inherently flawed, it quickly grows repetitive. The races that initially seem to be car-specific are actually repeated ad nauseam. Not every vehicle has the exact same races, but they pop up enough times to make the task of earning points a grind. The addition of cops to the Burnout Paradise equation feels out of place at best, and the difficulty of escaping from them with very little reward make them utterly pointless at worse.

Whether you should get Need for Speed: Most Wanted depends on what you want out of it. If you are looking for a fantastic multiplayer arcade racer, by all means, pick it up. However, if you are looking for a good solo racer, you should probably look elsewhere.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-06-15

Better on multiplayer.

mig51

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

Need for Speed Most Wanted has the weird position of sharing its name with a title from earlier in this console generation, but being a spiritual successor to an entirely different title from that generation. The original Most Wanted was one of those titles that bridged the gap between the PS2 and the PS3 by being released in very slight variations on both systems. It was a fun and silly title that used live-action actors to depict its tale of street racers and the police.

The latest Need for Speed Most Wanted has absolutely nothing to do with that game, though. Developed by Criterion, the game pulls almost all of its core gameplay elements from Burnout Paradise, with a few major tweaks. Just like Burnout: Paradise, it takes place in an open world where both the traversal between races and the racing itself happens. Also just like Paradise, it has a massive amount of leaderboards to compete with friends on, this time supplemented by the autolog system that EA has become so fond of.

Most Wanted's multiplayer is also very similar to that of Paradise, in that it simply dumps people into the world and allows the host to choose events, which consist of crazy challenges instead of the usual point-to-point races. For example, one event requires to park yourself on the wing of a plane and stay there. The players compete in the event, then drive on to the next one. This mode really shines in how it encourages players to be complete dicks to one another. If you are taken down during a multiplayer event, you are automatically disqualified, encouraging constant violence between players and creating an extremely hectic and fun experience.

All this said, the game absolutely falls apart when it comes to the single player. Solo play shifts the game's focus to its wide array of cars. As you drive around in the world, you find new, extremely expensive cars just sitting on the side of the road for you to hop in. Each car has a set events that you have to win in order to unlock upgrades and get "speed points" which allow you to race AI drivers on the "Most Wanted" list.

While the system is not inherently flawed, it quickly grows repetitive. The races that initially seem to be car-specific are actually repeated ad nauseum. Not every vehicle has the exact same races, but they pop up enough times to make the task of earning points a grind. The addition of cops to the Burnout Paradise equation feels out of place at best, and the difficulty of escaping from them with very little reward make them utterly pointless at worse.

Whether you should get Need for Speed: Most Wanted depends on what you want out of it. If you are looking for a fantastic multiplayer arcade racer, by all means, pick it up. However, if you are looking for a good solo racer, you should probably look elsewhere.


  Viewing Reviews 1-10 of 12