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13 Reviews


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Posted:
2013-12-27

severnsider

Super Gamer Dude

5.0

Rise of the Guardians was released in North America on November 20, 2012. It was developed by Torus Games and received mostly mediocre to low critical reviews. Gameplay features five different playable characters, and you can switch characters at any time. On top of that, up to four players can play cooperatively at once. Multiplayer is drop in/drop out. Despite these features, which by themselves would indicate ease to pick up and play, most players have found out the hard way that the game is very repetitive and doesn't offer enough content to make a purchase a great idea.

The aggregate ratings site Metacritic gave the game a pretty low overall score of 44/100. Nine reviews were used to find the score. Out of the nine, four were mixed and five were negative.

Complaints centered around blandness. There is absolutely nothing to this game that sets it apart from the crowd. Although you can play as Jack Frost, Santa, the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy and the Sandman, all of the characters are available at any time, making the decision relatively pointless. The characters offer differences in special moves and attacks, all of which can be upgraded via an in-game mechanic. Movement is relatively slow, which starts to become irritating pretty early on in the game.

Rise of the Guardians is certainly monotonous, and the way the levels are set up will show more than anything why this is so. During the course of the story mode, you will fight your way through the five Guardian realms. Each realm has six missions, and the six missions are always the same: Shadow Stompers, Protectors of Belief, Cage Break, Find Your Center, Gate Guardian and Treasure Collectors.

Each mission basically consists of fighting your way through a horde of enemies to complete your objective. On top of that, although the levels are superficially different, they are all very much the same. The frustrating sameness of it all really detracts from the experience of playing. Graphics and audio are both decent, but not great; there were equal or better titles on last-generation consoles.

The one positive thing that the game has going for it is the control scheme, which is simple and intuitive, allowing anyone to pick up on the controls fairly rapidly.

Overall, this game isn't recommended for any serious or even half-serious gamer. The only ones that will enjoy a title like this are the younger crowd, and even they will lose interest fairly rapidly when confronted with the end-game credits, as there is virtually no replay value to be found. Sadly, Rise of the Guardians has become yet another title that shows us that low-budget video games created from movies aren't usually any good. If you do happen to pick up a copy, it's recommended that you grab a couple friends and fight your way through the crowds of enemies on co-op mode, as that is probably the best (and possibly only) way to get any real entertainment out of it.

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Posted:
2013-08-17

severnsider

Super Gamer Dude

7.5

Just Dance Disney is another installment in the successful just dance series for the Wii gaming system. Ideal for young and old alike, all the favorite Disney character are here. Learn dance moves with top Disney stars and movie characters, and have a ball doing so.

The developers of games in the dance and sing genre must soon run out of fresh ideas, after all there surely must be a limit to how many ways you can dress up what is basically the same game and present it as in some way being new. that said at least this take on the games is welcome as it features some of the best cartoon characters around, coming as they do from the marvelous, Disney stable.

Although some of the older Disney characters do have a certain depth and possess a subtle humor, thus appealing to an older generation, this take on the Disney creations will be mostly of interest to children who will get a kick from dancing along with Stitch, Bolt, Ariel. The dance moves are simple enough for even the youngest Disney fan to dance along, and the game will put them in the action and scenery of their favorite Disney movies and shows. Whether they want to dance among the coral reefs with Ariel, or go to the ball with Cinderella, or simply do the Squirrels in my pants dance with Candace from Phineas and Ferb, it is all there in one convenient format. The dance moves are easily learned through step by step instructions, and the characters walk players through the routines, slowly and gradually increasing the difficulty and speed until the player is able to master, and put together, a wide variety of steps.

This is sure to be a hit with experienced and non experienced gamers alike. Whether proficiency in the gaming world is acquired or being worked on, all are sure to love the interactive features and the ability to become absorbed in a new and exciting world. It may be a basic dancing game, but the graphics and sound track make up for any lacking in complicated game formats.

To sum it up in very few words, the concept is very simple and based upon some of the best cartoon and animated characters ever to hit the screen. If you like Disney and like to dance, or if you just like Disney, you will like this game even if it is only to see some of Disney's best loved creations.

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Posted:
2014-06-28

A mediocre title.

severnsider

Super Gamer Dude

5.0

Rise of the Guardians was released in North America on November 20, 2012. It was developed by Torus Games and received mostly mediocre to low critical reviews. Gameplay features five different playable characters, and you can switch characters at any time. On top of that, up to four players can play cooperatively at once. Multiplayer is drop in/drop out. Despite these features, which by themselves would indicate ease to pick up and play, most players have found out the hard way that the game is very repetitive and doesn't offer enough content to make a purchase a great idea.

The aggregate ratings site Metacritic gave the game a pretty low overall score of 44/100. Nine reviews were used to find the score. Out of the nine, four were mixed and five were negative.

Complaints centered around blandness. There is absolutely nothing to this game that sets it apart from the crowd. Although you can play as Jack Frost, Santa, the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy and the Sandman, all of the characters are available at any time, making the decision relatively pointless. The characters offer differences in special moves and attacks, all of which can be upgraded via an in-game mechanic. Movement is relatively slow, which starts to become irritating pretty early on in the game.

Rise of the Guardians is certainly monotonous, and the way the levels are set up will show more than anything why this is so. During the course of the story mode, you will fight your way through the five Guardian realms. Each realm has six missions, and the six missions are always the same: Shadow Stompers, Protectors of Belief, Cage Break, Find Your Center, Gate Guardian and Treasure Collectors.

Each mission basically consists of fighting your way through a horde of enemies to complete your objective. On top of that, although the levels are superficially different, they are all very much the same. The frustrating sameness of it all really detracts from the experience of playing. Graphics and audio are both decent, but not great; there were equal or better titles on last-generation consoles.

The one positive thing that the game has going for it is the control scheme, which is simple and intuitive, allowing anyone to pick up on the controls fairly rapidly.

Overall, this game isn't recommended for any serious or even half-serious gamer. The only ones that will enjoy a title like this are the younger crowd, and even they will lose interest fairly rapidly when confronted with the end-game credits, as there is virtually no replay value to be found. Sadly, Rise of the Guardians has become yet another title that shows us that low-budget video games created from movies aren't usually any good. If you do happen to pick up a copy, it's recommended that you grab a couple friends and fight your way through the crowds of enemies on co-op mode, as that is probably the best (and possibly only) way to get any real entertainment out of it.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-26

severnsider

Super Gamer Dude

5.0

Rise of the Guardians was released in North America on November 20, 2012. It was developed by Torus Games and received mostly mediocre to low critical reviews. Gameplay features five different playable characters, and you can switch characters at any time. On top of that, up to four players can play cooperatively at once. Multiplayer is drop in/drop out. Despite these features, which by themselves would indicate ease to pick up and play, most players have found out the hard way that the game is very repetitive and doesn't offer enough content to make a purchase a great idea.

The aggregate ratings site Metacritic gave the game a pretty low overall score of 44/100. Nine reviews were used to find the score. Out of the nine, four were mixed and five were negative.

Complaints centered around blandness. There is absolutely nothing to this game that sets it apart from the crowd. Although you can play as Jack Frost, Santa, the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy and the Sandman, all of the characters are available at any time, making the decision relatively pointless. The characters offer differences in special moves and attacks, all of which can be upgraded via an in-game mechanic. Movement is relatively slow, which starts to become irritating pretty early on in the game.

Rise of the Guardians is certainly monotonous, and the way the levels are set up will show more than anything why this is so. During the course of the story mode, you will fight your way through the five Guardian realms. Each realm has six missions, and the six missions are always the same: Shadow Stompers, Protectors of Belief, Cage Break, Find Your Center, Gate Guardian and Treasure Collectors.

Each mission basically consists of fighting your way through a horde of enemies to complete your objective. On top of that, although the levels are superficially different, they are all very much the same. The frustrating sameness of it all really detracts from the experience of playing. Graphics and audio are both decent, but not great; there were equal or better titles on last-generation consoles.

The one positive thing that the game has going for it is the control scheme, which is simple and intuitive, allowing anyone to pick up on the controls fairly rapidly.

Overall, this game isn't recommended for any serious or even half-serious gamer. The only ones that will enjoy a title like this are the younger crowd, and even they will lose interest fairly rapidly when confronted with the end-game credits, as there is virtually no replay value to be found. Sadly, Rise of the Guardians has become yet another title that shows us that low-budget video games created from movies aren't usually any good. If you do happen to pick up a copy, it's recommended that you grab a couple friends and fight your way through the crowds of enemies on co-op mode, as that is probably the best (and possibly only) way to get any real entertainment out of it.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-03-26

severnsider

Super Gamer Dude

5.0

Rise of the Guardians was released in North America on November 20, 2012. It was developed by Torus Games and received mostly mediocre to low critical reviews. Gameplay features five different playable characters, and you can switch characters at any time. On top of that, up to four players can play cooperatively at once. Multiplayer is drop in/drop out. Despite these features, which by themselves would indicate ease to pick up and play, most players have found out the hard way that the game is very repetitive and doesn't offer enough content to make a purchase a great idea.

The aggregate ratings site Metacritic gave the game a pretty low overall score of 44/100. Nine reviews were used to find the score. Out of the nine, four were mixed and five were negative.

Complaints centered around blandness. There is absolutely nothing to this game that sets it apart from the crowd. Although you can play as Jack Frost, Santa, the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy and the Sandman, all of the characters are available at any time, making the decision relatively pointless. The characters offer differences in special moves and attacks, all of which can be upgraded via an in-game mechanic. Movement is relatively slow, which starts to become irritating pretty early on in the game.

Rise of the Guardians is certainly monotonous, and the way the levels are set up will show more than anything why this is so. During the course of the story mode, you will fight your way through the five Guardian realms. Each realm has six missions, and the six missions are always the same: Shadow Stompers, Protectors of Belief, Cage Break, Find Your Center, Gate Guardian and Treasure Collectors.

Each mission basically consists of fighting your way through a horde of enemies to complete your objective. On top of that, although the levels are superficially different, they are all very much the same. The frustrating sameness of it all really detracts from the experience of playing. Graphics and audio are both decent, but not great; there were equal or better titles on last-generation consoles.

The one positive thing that the game has going for it is the control scheme, which is simple and intuitive, allowing anyone to pick up on the controls fairly rapidly.

Overall, this game isn't recommended for any serious or even half-serious gamer. The only ones that will enjoy a title like this are the younger crowd, and even they will lose interest fairly rapidly when confronted with the end-game credits, as there is virtually no replay value to be found. Sadly, Rise of the Guardians has become yet another title that shows us that low-budget video games created from movies aren't usually any good. If you do happen to pick up a copy, it's recommended that you grab a couple friends and fight your way through the crowds of enemies on co-op mode, as that is probably the best (and possibly only) way to get any real entertainment out of it.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-05-12

severnsider

Super Gamer Dude

7.2

The Darkness 2 is built around an emphasis on dark, violent storytelling and a complex main character. The game is based on a comic book series and stands out from other games by applying that comic art style to the game itself. This upfront lack of realism makes the bloody combat easier to stomach. If the game were rendered in full graphic detail, it would easily rank as one of the bloodiest games on the market. The first time players tear open a hapless man's ribcage and rip his heart out of his still beating chest they will appreciate the game's comic style in helping them keep their lunch. By trivializing the gore, the game empowers players to feel like incredible engines of destruction without going over the top.

The story is one of the stand-out elements of the game, the main character Jackie Estacado has fully realized his demonic powers and is using them to protect his criminal syndicate and avenge his slain girlfriend. While it might be easy to despise a character with demonic limbs growing out of him, the game is careful to remind players of Jackie's tortured humanity and the true fuel of emotion behind his bloody rampages.

The combat itself also stands out from other games. Most games go as far as a dual-wielding mechanic but this one goes a step further, presenting a quad-wielding mechanic that is seamlessly blended into the control scheme. Players control both of Jackie's demonic limps, while also being able to dual-wield conventional weapons. It may be easy to make such a mechanic overly complex, causing frustrated gamers to avoid the second weapon set. This is not the case with The Darkness 2. The game also awards higher levels of experience for using combo attacks with the demonic arms as opposed to just blasting enemies with a machine gun.

The game succeeds so well mostly because it is not just a senseless arena of slaughter. The story does slow down at times to help the player enjoy its more nuanced elements and characters before ramping the action back up again. These moments of pause give the gameplay meaning.

If players manage to make their way through the intense single-player campaign, The Darkness 2 delivers at the multiplayer level as well. A series of co-op missions and optional stories will keep players working long after the final game credits roll. The enhanced difficulty of the co-op experience means it really does require the assistance of a friend, and it is not just a slapped on extension of single-player.

The Darkness 2 stands out as a game that takes many unique features in both graphical presentation and gameplay mechanics and makes them work well. This otherwise flawless presentation is marred by a lack of polish, including some serious bugs, which break an otherwise perfect gaming experience. Most players, however, should be able to overlook these minor setbacks. The limited edition of the game comes with several worthwhile add-ons, including two in-game character upgrades, a printed portrait, and digital copies of the comics that spawned the game.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-05-12

severnsider

Super Gamer Dude

7.2

The Darkness 2 is built around an emphasis on dark, violent storytelling and a complex main character. The game is based on a comic book series and stands out from other games by applying that comic art style to the game itself. This upfront lack of realism makes the bloody combat easier to stomach. If the game were rendered in full graphic detail, it would easily rank as one of the bloodiest games on the market. The first time players tear open a hapless man's ribcage and rip his heart out of his still beating chest they will appreciate the game's comic style in helping them keep their lunch. By trivializing the gore, the game empowers players to feel like incredible engines of destruction without going over the top.

The story is one of the stand-out elements of the game, the main character Jackie Estacado has fully realized his demonic powers and is using them to protect his criminal syndicate and avenge his slain girlfriend. While it might be easy to despise a character with demonic limbs growing out of him, the game is careful to remind players of Jackie's tortured humanity and the true fuel of emotion behind his bloody rampages.

The combat itself also stands out from other games. Most games go as far as a dual-wielding mechanic but this one goes a step further, presenting a quad-wielding mechanic that is seamlessly blended into the control scheme. Players control both of Jackie's demonic limps, while also being able to dual-wield conventional weapons. It may be easy to make such a mechanic overly complex, causing frustrated gamers to avoid the second weapon set. This is not the case with The Darkness 2. The game also awards higher levels of experience for using combo attacks with the demonic arms as opposed to just blasting enemies with a machine gun.

The game succeeds so well mostly because it is not just a senseless arena of slaughter. The story does slow down at times to help the player enjoy its more nuanced elements and characters before ramping the action back up again. These moments of pause give the gameplay meaning.

If players manage to make their way through the intense single-player campaign, The Darkness 2 delivers at the multiplayer level as well. A series of co-op missions and optional stories will keep players working long after the final game credits roll. The enhanced difficulty of the co-op experience means it really does require the assistance of a friend, and it is not just a slapped on extension of single-player.

The Darkness 2 stands out as a game that takes many unique features in both graphical presentation and gameplay mechanics and makes them work well. This otherwise flawless presentation is marred by a lack of polish, including some serious bugs, which break an otherwise perfect gaming experience. Most players, however, should be able to overlook these minor setbacks. The limited edition of the game comes with several worthwhile add-ons, including two in-game character upgrades, a printed portrait, and digital copies of the comics that spawned the game.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-08-17

severnsider

Super Gamer Dude

7.0

Designed specifically for the PlayStation Vita, Gravity Rush fits into the single player action-adventure category with some Role Playing and Platforming elements thrown in. I suppose the idea was to show off exactly what the PS Vita is capable of, a tactic which could easily have backfired because it could just as well have shown what the PS Vita was not very good at. The Vita specific functionality is the gyro motion sensor and touch control screen and the greatly enhanced graphics capabilities. On the whole it seems to have achieved some degree of success on the technical side.

Set in a world far in the future where unexplained powerful gravitational disturbances herald the appearance of alien creatures, the Nevi, who proceed to kill and destroy all who stand in their way. But cometh the hour cometh the man, or in this case, young girl, Kat, who has somehow been given the superhuman power of controlling gravity. She does not know how this power came about as she has lost all memory of the her past. Her mission is to save Hekesville a floating city and in her this mission she is aided and guided by a mysterious being whose manifestation, or familiar, is would you believe, a black cat which goes by the name of Dusty. Dusty helps her develop and refine her newly acquired gravity altering abilities. Kat, being the main character is the part you play.

Other characters who play more than a small part in the game are the goodies, Raven, Syd, Gade, Cyanea and the baddies, Yunica, the Nevi, Nushi and Alias.

Starting with the goodies, Raven, a woman, fancifully attired, plays a confusing role at first appearing to be against the hero Kat and later revealing herself as an ally. Syd, the first person Kat meets when she first awakes memory-less in Hekesville, is a law officer who vicariously gets many promotions in rank on the back of actions taken by Kat. It is hard to decide if his uniform is meant to be futuristic as in some ways its looks a little old fashioned. Gade is a bearded, oldish man, dressed in a rather nondescript manner, a man of mystery, who is introduced to Kat by a fortune teller. He also has a somewhat confusing role and seems to be some sort of spiritual guide and explains to Kat where parts of her world, which have disappeared, are to be found. On opening his coat, instead of being a bit of a flasher. he reveals a portal into this missing world. Cyanea has an important role in the story as the city of Hekesville, and everything else in the game, resides in her imagination or dreams, and so she is the sort of creator of the world inhabited by the other characters. While she sleeps and dreams she is watched over by another entity inside her, the Guardian of Dreams.

As for the baddies, Yunica, a female member of the Special Defense Force, is bizarrely dressed in some sort of articulated high heeled thigh length boots, and is equally bizarrely armed, her right hand and arm taking the form of a lance. Her preferred mode of transport is a jet pack. She crops up at intervals during the game. The Nevi are peculiar, dangerous, although in appearance laughable rather than menacing, black and red one large eyed creatures who appear out of the gravity storms. They come in various forms, some easier to destroy than others and some require the ultimate Gravity Boot. Nushi is a giant Nevi in fish form which spends a lot of its time in the air firing Gravity Balls which you need to dodge. It has a nasty habit of attacking children. When not flying but resting it it becomes vulnerable exposing a weak spot at the back of its head. Alias is a male dressed in a pin striped suit and a non matching helmet, a bit of a fashion disaster, who goes around collecting sacred gems to put to some evil use.

The game gets off to a slow start and begins with Kat waking from sleep not knowing who she is or where she is, leaving plenty of scope for the story to develop and unfold. Although there is not a great deal to the story, the actual lore and interaction between characters is more complicated, and there are many side missions and contests.

The main mechanics of the controls is handling gravity, which you need to do to get where you want to go. This takes a little getting used to. Getting to where you want to be can be done by pointing the camera or double tapping the screen and as with other handheld devices twisting the device itself is a method of steering. It all seems to work pretty well once you get used to it, but the faster moving episodes of the game are a little difficult even with practice. Under some conditions there may be some lag and some load times are a little too long.

The graphics, as promised by the Vita, are sharp and more than adequate to the task of rendering the characters and scenery, which themselves are pretty undemanding technically. The overall presentation of the characters is flat and comic like, and while to some degree imaginative are rather childlike and even the bad guys are amusing rather than threatening, but it seems fit for purpose. Although a lot of the action takes place in Hekesville, other towns and locations are featured, and worth special mention are the Rift Planes which contain the pieces of the partially destroyed Hekesville. The city itself is massive and there is a lot to explore, enjoy or destroy.

Gravity Rush is very good when judged by the standards of handheld devices and is surprisingly rich in characters and locations. While not being the greatest game in the world it is probably the best yet on the PlayStation Vita and I would expect to see a sequel some time in the future as there are many possibilities of character and plot extension. There is already some DLC available offering new missions, trophies, costumes etc. at a low cost.

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Posted:
2013-08-17

severnsider

Super Gamer Dude

7.4

Just Dance Disney is another installment in the successful just dance series for the Xbox 360 system. Ideal for young and old alike, all the favorite Disney character are here. Learn dance moves with top Disney stars and movie characters, and have a ball doing so.

The developers of games in the dance and sing genre must soon run out of fresh ideas, after all there surely must be a limit to how many ways you can dress up what is basically the same game and present it as in some way being new. that said at least this take on the games is welcome as it features some of the best cartoon characters around, coming as they do from the marvelous, Disney stable.

Although some of the older Disney characters do have a certain depth and possess a subtle humor, thus appealing to an older generation, this take on the Disney creations will be mostly of interest to children who will get a kick from dancing along with Stitch, Bolt, Ariel. The dance moves are simple enough for even the youngest Disney fan to dance along, and the game will put them in the action and scenery of their favorite Disney movies and shows.

Whether they want to dance among the coral reefs with Ariel, or go to the ball with Cinderella, or simply do the Squirrels in my pants dance with Candace from Phineas and Ferb, it is all there in one convenient format. The dance moves are easily learned through step by step instructions, and the characters walk players through the routines, slowly and gradually increasing the difficulty and speed until the player is able to master, and put together, a wide variety of steps.

This is sure to be a hit with experienced and non experienced gamers alike. Whether proficiency in the gaming world is acquired or being worked on, all are sure to love the interactive features and the ability to become absorbed in a new and exciting world. It may be a basic dancing game, but the graphics and sound track makeup for any lacking in complicated game formats.

To sum it up in very few words, the concept is very simple and based upon some of the best cartoon and animated characters ever to hit the screen. If you like Disney and like to dance, or if you just like Disney, you will like this game even if it is only to see some of Disney's best loved creations.

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Posted:
2013-08-20

severnsider

Super Gamer Dude

7.3

For starters, THQ packs the collector's edition of game with a nice assortment of goodies. There is a hardcover art book, a digital copy of the game's soundtrack and admittedly, a pretty cool life-sized replica Death Mask that the game's protagonist, aptly named Death, wears. For the Darksider fan, this is an essential must-buy.

Now, when it comes to sequels, most people want all of the following. Bigger, faster, prettier and loads of more awesomeness that the first one provided is the bare minimum. With this being a series about the Apocalypse, you control members of the Four Horsemen from biblical texts. In Darksiders I, we controlled War as he tries to clear his name from starting the Apocalypse too soon. In Darksiders II, we get to use his brethren in the form of Death. Death is also tasked to clearing War's name. However, it is virtually impossible to talk about this game and not mention what is was to be instead of what it has become.

The game features staples from some of gaming's greatest games. Dungeon structure, just like the first Darksiders, follows a strong resemblance to the Legend of Zelda dungeons that you traverse. Fighting has been enhanced for the second Darksiders so that there is now more flow to the combat instead of the simplistic fighting that was a trademark of the first game, more in the vein of Bayonetta. Wall running is a direct reminder of the Prince of Persia series. These are not critiques of the game as one should look at what the best are doing and to pattern themselves after these efforts. There are even uses of portals, like in the game Portal. The problematic issue is that while all of these are implemented well in Darksiders II, these were implemented in a brilliant way in the aforementioned games so the feeling of retread is here.

Now, getting that out of the way, let's just judge the game for its own merits. Darksiders II is a good game. The story line offers one of the most compelling in gaming by using one of the most mythical characters in history, Death, the rider of the pale horse, with trademark scythe in tow as the weapon. With a name such as Death, he has to be fearsome, right? To say that he is fearsome is definitely an understatement. Scythes and more are swung, tossed and flung towards the direction of enemies with reckless abandon. Combat is much more satisfying in this game.

The graphical appearance of the game is greatly enhanced by the proper usage of gothic art. This is supposed to be a haunting game and the look of the game fits the bill. Landscapes are a beautiful thing to admire while you are riding around on horseback. The main characters in the game are meticulously modeled as well. Sound is a definite step up from Darksiders I. Jesper Kyd, from Assassin's Creed and Hitman, lent his talents to this game and it shows in the form of aural pleasure.

In conclusion, when looked at independently, this is a good game. When looking at the hype before the game, after the way the first Darksiders ended with the seventh seal being broken and in the sky, the other three Horsemen arrived to help War. With all of this and what appeared to be the obvious course for the story line to follow, being that it would be all out war from the Horsemen towards anyone that wanted cross them. Darksiders II had the promise of being put in the highest of pantheons of games, yet will now just serves as another reminder of what happens when developers play it safe instead of reaching for the stars.


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